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Full text of "Christian Cynosure"

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CHICAGO. MAY, 1909. 



Many Voices 



Annual Meeting 



President 
Blanchard's Letter 



Blasting at the 
Rock of Ages 



The Christian 
Church and her 
Greatest Enemy 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

• WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

MICE— Per year, in advance, $1.00,* three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
. mako a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

EIntered as Secood-class matter May 19, 1897, at t±»e 
Post OflBce at Chicagx), IJl., under Acl of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



The Annual Meeting 1 

The June Rally 1 

ThjB Eagle's Bill 2 

The Word of God Exalted in Chicago 2 

Blasting at the Rock of Ages 3 

The Enemies of Freemasonry 3 

Converted but Needing Light 4 

Facsimile of a Business Card 5 

Bryan a Famous Herquestrian 

*' Secret Lodge System." By Rev. J. V. 

Potts 6 

No Joiner, No Show^ 6 

Fraternity and Church, or the M. W. of 
A. By Rev. J. R. Dodds 7 

President Blanchard's Letter 13 

The Christian Church and Her Greatest 
Enemy. By Rev. Enos H. Hess .16 

New Lodge Appeals for Help — H. R. Bill 

27928 '. ..18 

Meeting in Lee, 111.— Rev. O. T. Lee 20 

Important to Lodge Pastors. By Rev. Mead 
A. Kelsey 21 

Contributions to N. C. A. Work 21 

From Evangelist Davis, Lundy, Mo 22 

Work in Texas 22 

Rev. S. A. Scarvie in South Dakota 22 

Secretary Stoddard's Letter 23 

Mrs. Lizzie Wood's Letter 24 

Great Credit Due Postal Department 25 

Seceder's Testimony as to Masonry — P. W. 

Baldwin 26 

From Our Mail 26 

A Mason on Masonry. Rev. G. W. Shep- 
herd .' 26 

Sample Cynosures 28 

Many Voices 29 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This bool£ gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
oflGlcer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry"-^Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
gravings. The oaths, obligations and lectures are 
quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flexible 
clotb, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes: "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
shiping Freemasons in the Christiais Church. 10 
cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THL 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By "Spectator," Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages; 
5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 

LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigious 
system, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion' ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
interesting. 30 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workings of 
Freemasonry," by Ex-President Charles G. Finney, 
of Oberlin Coilege. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association. 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, III. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

Its relation to civil government and the Chris* 
tian religion. By President J. . Blanchard. The 
un-Christian, anti-republican and despotic char* 
acter of Freemasonry is proved from the highest 
Masonic authorities. 5 cents. 





"JesDS answered him, — I spake openly t» ibe vurid; and in secret have I said nothing," John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLII. 



CHICAGO, MAY, 1909. 



NUMBER 1 



THE NATIONA L CHRISTIA N ASSOCIATION 

Invite you to the 



Annual Conference 

respecting 

SECRET SOCIETIES 

in the 

BELDEN AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Cor. Belden Avenue and Halsted Street, CHICAGO 

Thursday and Friday, June 3rd and 4th, 1909 

^ Among the speakers are Prof. John O. Reed, Dean Michigan 
University, Rev. Wm. Dallmann, President English Synod, Lutheran 

Church, President Blanchard of 

Wheaton College and others. 



Seats Free 



Ail Welcome 



WHAT ABOUT MAY THIRTIETH? 

Will you see your pastor at once and 
get him to preach May 30 on the rela- 
tion of secret societies to the home, the 
church and the person of our Lord? We 
would not think it advisable to urge pas- 
tors who have recently preached on this 
subject, though there is no question but 
thousands every year are lost to the 
Church and secured by the Lodge be- 
cause the people lack instruction. 



We expect the June Cynosure to be 
in the mail by May 25 with additional 
facts of interest about the Annual Meet- 
ing of June 3 and 4. How many cop- 
ies can you use to advantage? 



THE JUNE RALLY. 

The most important meeting of the 
year to the Cause is that of our Annual 
Meeting June 3 and 4. The oftener one 
attends the more important it seems. 
Rev. J. W. Brink, president of the Mich- 
igan Association, and pastor of an im- 
portant church in Grand Rapids, writes 



that we may expect a delegation from 
Michigan. "I am looking forward to go- 
ing and hope that nothing will inter- 
fere." His experience is an illustra- 
tion in point. Our vice-president, Rev. 
J. Groen, is another Michigan man who 
realizes the benefits of such a gathering- 
and, like Mr. Brink, is no stranger to 
these annual conferences. Compara- 
tively few of the many friends of this 
movement can be present, but the vari- 
ous churches of the score of denomina- 
tions that are in sympathy can hold spe- 
cial services on the Sunday previous ; 
that is Sabbath, May 30, setting forth 
the importance of this movement and its 
relation to the Church of Christ. 
The Church and the Lodge. 

Just as Baalism crowded upon and 
into the Jewish church so Lodgism, its 
twin, to-day is affecting the Christian 
church. 

The Pawtucket (R. L) Evening Times 
gave an account last month of the Ma- 
sonic "Feast of the Paschal Lamb" had 
in Providence, R. L, on the evening of 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



April 8. Last month in Chicago some 
250 are said to have been received into 
the Scottish Rite at one time. No oth- 
er Masonic rite equals this in caricatur- 
ing the Book of Revelation and the Cru- 
cifixion of our Lord. The object of the 
Scottish Rite, said the late Jonathan 
Blanchard in his vigorous way, ''is to 
burlesque and degrade Christ." ''Sacri- 
lege is profaning sacred things. And this 
degree (17th S. R.) uses the sacred sym- 
bols of the Revelation to run its own 
dirt machine." "You see the august and 
awful symbols of the Apocalypse used 
as wheel-grease for their devil's ma- 
chine." How emphatically true is this 
indictment is known to every one who 
has read the Scotch Rite Rituals. 

This appeal is made to pastors in sym- 
pathy with the objects of our coming 
Annual Meeting. How many will make 
it the subject of special prayers at their 
mid-week service May 26 or. 27? 

How many' will hold such a service on 
the Sabbath of May 30? Such help as 
we can give will be freely furnished to 
pastors for that occasion. 



THE EAGLE'S BILL. 

Under the heading, "Goat is Too 
Strenuous," the Pittsburg Gazette tells 
of a suit for $5,000 brought against an 
Eagle lodge in Butler, Pa., about a year 
after the initiation in which serious in- 
jury is alleged to have been done. The 
complainant says that he shall be 
a cripple all his life, his leg having been 
broken during a rigorous initiation. He 
charges the fault to the degree team, and 
liow reveals that he was sworn to se- 
crecy, so that during this long time he 
has allowed it to be supposed that he 
broke his leg by falling down stairs. 
Swearing him not to tell, and propagat- 
ing a false explanation, seem, truly fra- 
ternal — in the lodge sense of the term. 
The Aerie of Eagles appears to have 
fraternally neglected, not to say refus- 
ed, to indemnify the brother. He now 
appeals from an Eagle to a judge. Sa- 
loon birds must not be expected to fly 
too high; "Yea, Yea!" neither must 
make-believe Eagles be expected to be 
too niuch gentler than the rapacious 
birds whose name they steal. 



THE WORD OF GOD EXALTED IN 
CHICAGP. 

BY EZ^A WESTCOTE CLARK. 

An experiment in instructive evangel- 
ism has been successfully tried in the 
heart of Chicago's great commercial dis- 
trict by Dr. James M. Gray, dean of 
the Moody Bible Institute, who has just 
concluded a series of noon-day meetings 
for busines's men and women in the Great 
Northern Theater, located adjacent to 
the great department stores and office 
buildings, which make the city the 
"Great Central Market" of the country. 

Dr. Gray believes in the Bible. He be- 
lieves in it not as a literary classic, or 
collection of interesting traditions. He 
believes in the Bible as the inspired 
Word of God. To him it is meat and 
drink. It is the revelation to him of 
the divine plan of salvation. 

His meetings have been unique. De- 
parting from the usual methods of evan- 
gelism, he discarded all attempts at emo- 
tionalism and the telling of catching sto- 
ries. The gatherings were the most 
deeply spiritual and religiously instruc- 
tive that have been held in Chicago in 
a generation. Not for years has the city 
given such enthusiastic support to a 
series of religious meetings. The build- 
ing was crowded at all times and the at- 
tention accorded to the speakers and 
singers was little less than remarkable. 

"Five Roman Jewels" formed the sub- 
ject of Dr. Gray's daily message. It 
developed that the jewels were really the 
five fundamental principles of the gospel 
as revealed in Paul's epistle to the Ro- 
mans, as follows : Salvation, Satisfac- 
tion, Sanctification, Security and Serv- 
ice. 

Dr. Gray is essentially a teacher. He 
has the happy faculty of interesting and 
holding the attention of large audiences. 
For years his services have been in con- 
stant demand at large Bible conferences 
and conventions, his engagements along 
this line carrying him into all parts of 
the country, and annually for a number 
of years across the ocean. 

Studiously avoiding all methods and 
appeals that might be construed as sen- 
sational emotionalism and evangelists, es- 
teeming it their mission to exalt the 



May, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Word of God, endeavored to press home 
to the hearts of men and women the 
principles of the gospel and inculcate in 
the lives of the people a love for the 
truth as it is in Christ Jesus. 

"Were there any conversions?" you 
ask. 

"Yes." Personal work with inquirers 
was quietly done at every meeting. 

"Were not the results of the meetings 
lost if no cards were signed and if the 
people were not urged to join particular 
churches?" 

"No." 

Once the Word of God is implanted in 
the human heart and given the slightest 
encouragement to grow, it will be wa- 
tered and nourished by the Holy Spirit 
and eventually will become manifest in 
the life. 

Thus was the Word magnified in Chi- 
cago. 



BLASTING AT THE ROCK OF AGES. 

This is the title of a series of articles 
soon to appear in The Cosmopolitan 
Magazine. 

"In himdrecls of classrooms, according to 
Mr. Bolce, it i,s tbein;? taught dniiy ttiat tlit' 
decalogue is no more sacred ttian a syllabus ; 
that the home as an institution is doomed; 
that there ar-} no absolute evils ; that im- 
morality is siniply an act in contravention 
of society's accepted standards ; that democ- 
racy is a failure and the Declaration of Iil- 
dependence only spectacular rhetoric ; tiiat 
the change froin one religion to another is 
like getting a new hat ; that moral precepts 
are passing shibboleths; that conceptions of 
right and wrong are as unstable as styles 
of dress ; that wide stairways are open be- 
tween social levels, but that to the climber 
children are an incumbrance; that the sole 
effect of prolificacy is to fill tiny graves; and 
that there cdn be anrl are holier alliances 
without the marriage' bond Uunx within it. 
These are some of the revolutionary and sen- 
sational teachings submitted with academic 
warrant to the minds of hundreds of thou- 
sands of students in the United States." 

More than sixty-five years ago in 
Riply, Ohio, President Jonatiian Blan- 
chard gave an address which began with 
these words : 

"It was a cunning and efi^ectual ar- 
tifice of ancient savage warfare to pol- 
lute the fountains of a land and poison 



its wells ; nor will Satan, the arch foe 
of mien, be likely to omit a like policy 
in destroying souls. 

"The churches and seminaries of a 
land are its well-springs of thought ; and 
as the thoughts of a free nation, as of 
an individual, govern its actions and de- 
termine its character, these institutions 
can not be too warmly cherished, too 
wisely guarded or too sedulously watch- 
ed. For in civilized countries, the force 
of public opinion is the force of law ; 
and to teach a land is to govern it." 

God save our country from profess- 
edly Christian teachers who are not so in 
fact ! 



THE GENIUS OF FREEMASONRY. 

"The Genius of Freemasonry and the 
Twentieth Century Crusade,'' by J. D. 
Buck, is reviewed in a well-written arti- 
cle by Rev. James Stoddard in "Home 
Light" for October. Mr. Buck's book is 
an attack on what he names Politico- 
Ecclesiastical Clericalism. Two world 
powers are in conflict, "Freemasonry and 
Clericalism." Freemasonry is a "summary 
of human wisdom, clear, concise, and 
simple, such as nowhere exists in the 
world." Clericalism, on the other hand, 
is irrational, dogmatic, bigoted, avari- 
cious, subtle, unscrupulous, and insatia-. 
ble in its greed for place and power. Yet 
his attack is not on Romanism alone, for 
he includes Protestantism in the world- 
power that Freemasonry must destroy. 

He admits, however, that Jesus wp- 
chief among ancient Masonic brethren, 
and prince among the magi of his age. 
In becoming so he was aided by the Wise 
Men of the East, with whom he proba- 
bly spent the eighteen years between his 
interview with the doctors of the law in 
the Temple and his public appearance as 
a teacher. They taught him the genius, 
the landmarks, and the mysteries of 
Freemasonry. As a result he gained sa- 
gacity and power, becoming "a perfect 
and upright man and i\Iason." Mr. Stod- 
dard notes that ^Ir. Buck shares the no- 
tion of certain other authors who hold 
that "the Christian religion originated 
from ancient Freemasonry." 

The book seems also to claim that the 
republic was founded by Masonry, which 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



framed the constitution and is the source 
of all that has been good in its politics, 
while all the evil has come from lack of 
adherence to Masonic ideals. He charges 
cowardice or treason on all Masons who 
refuse to use their controlling influence 
in churches, and their two million votes 
in the nation, in wiping out summarily 
the religious world power. He declares 
that "America to-day is not only facing 
the most momentous issue in her history^ 
but the issue is one that cannot long be 
evaded." Naturally, Mr. Stoddard gives 
his review of such a book the descriptive 
title, ''Coming into the Open"; he him- 
self was already there, though always 
on the defensive side. 



CONVERTED BUT NEEDING LIGHT. 

The writer has before him a letter 
from a gentleman, who, with his wife, 
was converted recently and he says that 
their conscience seems to tell them that 
they ought to leave the Woodnien, Odd 
Fellow and Rebekah Lodges, of which 
they are members, but that they need ad- 
vice. He says that he has been to sev- 
eral ministers, who advise him to get 
out of the lodges, but fail to give him 
any reason why he ought to do so. 

Perhaps these pastors belong to that 
class who say that all that is needed is to 
''preach the Gospel." Perhaps they be- 
long to another class. A pastor once gave 
to the writer at some length his reasons 
why a Christian ought not to hold mem- 
bership in a secret lodge, and closed by 
saying, I have spoken to you freely, but 
confidentially, and request you not to lei 
my views on this subject be known in 
this town, for if they become known I 
shall have to abandon . this pulpit. 

We do not know why the pastors, con- 
sulted by our brother and sister, did not 
give them the instruction that they need- 
ed about membership in secret societies, 
but there is great need for the readers 
of the Cynosure to supplement the work 
of many pastors. Something like the 
following would be helpful to many 
souls. 

Church Member Not Lodge Member. 

First. Because God and Christ and 
His people are the light of the world 
and none of them oppose His orders to 
do good. "God is light." I. John i :5, 



Jesus Christ said : "I am the light." John 
6: 12. He also said: "You are the light." 
Matt. 5:14. Light is opposed to dark- 
ness and secrecy. 

Second. Secret societies unite, godly 
and godless men in unequal fellowship. 
This is forbidden by H. Cor. 6:i4ti8. If 
all the members of a lodge in one place 
should be Christians, still, the same lodge 
in the next town might be made up al- 
most exclusively of godless and wicked 
men. A man who joins the Woodmen in 
South Dakota, or any lodge in his State, 
belongs to the Woodmen also in every 
other State. He ought not to become 
yoked with wicked men, if he is a Chris- 
tian. 

Third. If one man should be strong 
enough to belong to a lodge without fall- 
ing into sin, yet his brother may not be 
able to do so. If he is able to remain 
away from the dances, the Sabbath- 
breaking excursion and the drinking ban- 
quets, yet his brother may not be able 
to do anyone of these things. So the 
Christian who belongs to the lodge may 
occasion the temporal and eternal ruin 
of his weak brother, who belongs to the 
same lodge. Rom. 14:15, 21; I. Cor. 8: 
12, 13. 

Fourth. We are commanded to be fol- 
lowers of those who, through faith and 
patience, have inherited the promises. 
Heb. 6:12. That is, we ought to be en- 
ergetic Christians and to follow in the 
steps of godly men who have done serv- 
ice for the Kingdom of Jesus Christ. 
Those scriptures forbid our fellowship 
in secret societies, for whatever may be 
true of professed Christians, who are 
found in secret societies, it is unquestion- 
able that the great majority of earnest, 
godly men have never maintained such 
relations : John Wesley, Charles G. Fin- 
ney, Dwight L. Moody, Major Whittle, 
R. A. Torrey and a great host of other 
men of like minds. They taught that 
secret societies are inconsistent with the 
example and teaching of Jesus Christ; 
they kept out of such organizations 
themselves and warned other Christians 
to do the same. 

Fifth. Secret organizations in their 
initiations defile and dishonor the temple 
of the Holy Ghost. They are improving 
in this respect as fast as public, Chris- 



May, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



tian sentiment compels them to do so, 
but they still strip, blind-fold, halter and 
knock about the bodies of men which 
God has created for temples of the Holy 
Ghost. I. Cor. 3:16, 17; I. Cor. 6:19, 20. 



FACSIMILE OF A BUSINES CARD. 

<Face of card : the Vvords italicized are writ- 
ten on card with lead pencil ; other word- 
ing is as printed.) 

DIRECTORS. 
Geo. C. Zeigler, Frank Gillard^ 
C. E. Showers, J. M. Endicott, 
B. M. Johnson, G F. Martin. 

OFFICERS. 
GEO. C. ZEIGLER, Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 
W. F. ELLIOTT, Sec. & Treas. 
G. F. MARTIN, Superintendent. 

The Edwards Vitrified Brick & Sewer 
Pipe Co. 

// you arc a Mason yon zvill understand 

this card, if not, yon will not. 

Albion, Illinois. 

Over. 

(Back of card: a few typographical errors 

are reproduced which appear on the card.) 

The following conversation was over- 
heard, it being between a policeman and 
tramp printer : 

From whence came you? 

From a tow;; down the railroad, to the 
south, called Grayville, on the Wabash. 

What's vour business here? 

To learn to subdue my appetite and 
sponge my living from an indulgent pub- 
lic. 

Then you are a regular tramp, I pre- 
sume ? 

I am so taken jind accepted wherever 
I go. 

How do you know yourself to be a 
tramp ? 

In seeking food, by being often de- 
nied, but ready to try again. 

Will you be oflf or from ? 

With your permission, I will be off 
very quick. 

Of what were you in pursuit? 

Work, which, by my own endeavors 
and with the assistance of others, I hope 
I shall never be able to find. 

Where were you made a tramp? 

In a regular organized country, where 



only the rich enjoy life, and the laboring 
man was considerrably below par. 

How were you prepared to become a 
tramp ? 

By being divested of everything I had 
of value, reduced to poverty, and thrown 
upon the world barefoot and hungry. 

How gained you admission to this 
town ? 

By the assistance of a tie-pass over the 
Big Four. 

Had you the pass ? 

I had it not; my chum had it for me. 

Whither art thou traveling? 

As soon as I get out of your clutches 
I'll journey Eastward, and that, too, at a 
lively pace. 

On entering this town how were you 
received ? 

On the end of a policeman's billy, ap- 
plied to my naked off ear, which was to 
teach me that, as the ear is the most ten- 
der organ in cold weather, so might the 
recollection thereof ever be to my mind 
and conscience should I again attempt to 
enter a strange town without the neces- 
sary money to pay for a night s lodging. 

What did the policeman say to you? 

He asked me, "Who comes here?" 

Your answer? 

A poor weary traveler, who has not 
tasted food for days, and though he is 
short on funds, he is long on walks, and 
will travel many blocks further upon the 
assurance of being able to encounter a 
free lunch. 

What followed? 

I was directed to wait with patience 
until the marshal could be informed of 
my deplorable condition, and his answer 
returned. 

What answer did he return? 

Let him enter the station and we will 
endeavor to feed him and permit him to 
work out his board bill on the streets. 



Bad men may do right from selfisli 
reasons ; good men do right regardless of 
consequences. 



"Home happiness is the incense that 
rises from the altar of mutual self- 
sacrifice." 



Earnestness spells sincerity. 



6 



CHRISTIAJ^ CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



A FAMOUS HIRQUESTRIAN. 

If W. J. Bryan ever wishes to retire 
from journalism and politics, the natural 
thing for him to do is to settle on a goat 
ranch and tend his accumulated flock ; for 
his favorite exercise is neither golf-play- 
ing, equestrianism, nor tennis, but goat 
riding. His regular trade for the present 
is that of a joiner ; we do not know what 
he has joined. He joins lodges and 
builds platforms. 

Lately, the Eagles have fitted him 
with wings. Some of our readers may 
have heard near a saloon, or through its 
open door, the yell ''Yea! Yea!" That 
is the cry of the Eagles. In his new 
nest, or Aerie, or lodge, he found among 
the officers a Worthy Secretary who is 
a bartender; Worthy Chaplain (or un- 
worthy) bartender of a saloon ; two trus- 
tees, saloonkeepers. The bartending 
chaplain doubtless made a prayer, or per- 
formed some ostensibly religious service, 
and the eloquent candidate delighted his 
saloon audience with an address on the 
subject of Equality. Perhaps he made 
himself the equal of the chaplain. 

The Patriot Phalanx, a prohibition pa- 
per published at Indianapolis, begins an 
article relating to this initiation by say- 
ing :^ 'The latest exploit of William 
Jennings Bryan is not calculated to in- 
crease the confidence of those demo- 
cratic supporters who have looked to 
the "Peerless Leader" as the hope of the 
temperance and prohibition cause in pol- 
itics;" and closes the article with the 
text, "Your covenant with Death shall 
be annulled, and your agreement with 
Hell shall not stand." 



SECRET LODGE SYSTEM. 

We called attention in our last num- 
ber to a book by Rev. John V. Potts, 
The Secret Lodge System. The book is 
boun-d in cloth, 202 pages, and is sold by 
the German Literary Board, Burlington, 
Iowa, at $1.25 per copy. 

The contents are divided into five 
parts. Part first contains a description of 
the two forms of organization, the open 
and the secret. Part second contrasts 
the two systems. Part three gives testi- 
monies of eminent men. Part four is 
entitled "Spirit of the Muse." The last 
division undertakes to give the remedy. 



NO JOINER, NO SHOW. 

The little organ of a certain lodge of 
the Royal Arcanum lately covered its 
last page with matter from which we 
copy the following: 
"We Must Have Applications for Mem= 

bership in Our Council or Stop All 

Entertainments." 

March 15, 1909. 

"Brothers — The above statement ex- 
plains the situation in regard to future 
entertainments. Our dance on February 
22 was a signal success — large crowd, a 
jolly good time, and only one applica- 
tion. SHAME ON YOU; COME, 
WAKE UP! You have evidently for- 
gotten that the principal object of these 
good times is to secure suitable mem- 
bers for our Council. We must have 
them. A series of entertainments has 
been arranged for by your Orator, such 
as have never before been attempted; 
but unless twelve bona-fide applications 
are received by the next regular meet- 
ing, all contracts will be cancelled and 
the Orator will take a much needed rest. 

"A glance at the following program 
will give an idea of what is in store 
for you. Not one amateur in the lot. 
All the artists are filling engagements in 
this city during the week of March 22. 

"Use the enclosed tickets to advantage 
and induce men who are worthy of com- 
panionship in our Council to join us.'* 

There follows a program of "Refined 
Vaudeville." 



I have read the CYNOSURE with 
great interest and profit, and being en- 
gaged in Anti-secret work in this city, 
need all the information on the subject 
I can secure. 

Wishing you God's richest blessings in 
this most necessary and difficult work, 
and assuring you of my co-operation, I 
am Yours in His work, 

• (Rev.) Theodor O. Posselt. 



If anywhere there is an answering 
smile it will be found in the face of the 
child. The encouragement of that smile 
should be one of the pleasures of matur- 
er years. 



Death is a child of sin. 



May, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



€0tttnbutt0tt0» 



FRATERNITY AND CHURCH. 

Or Secrets of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

BY REV. R. J. DODDS. 

A circular under the above title has 
recently been widely distributed in this 
community. It has been sent through 
the mails to a number of members of 
the church to which I minister, a church 
which is so strongly opposed to the iden- 
tification of those who profess godli- 
ness with secret and private societies, 
which should be reproved, that it will 
not admit one of their members into its 
membership. 

It is an anonymous production, pub- 
lished apparently with at least a two-fold 
object. The first object is to secure an 
increase in lodg'e membership. The sec- 
ond is to soothe a troublesome con- 
science. 

The writer is clearly both a church 
member, or, at least, possessed of a cer- 
tain degree of attachment to the church, 
and a member of the fraternity. He ap- 
pears to have had such instruction at 
his mother's knee, and such an influence 
about him in his father's home, as makes 
his identification with the lodge uncom- 
fortable. 

It is impossible to look upon the cir- 
cular otherwise than in the nature of a 
challenge to the only church in the com- 
munity, so far as I know, that takes a 
positive stand against such societies, and 
absolutely refuses to fellowship in church 
membership any person who has connec- 
tion with the lodge. This tract is my 
answer to this challenge, and I hope it 
may in the good providence of God prove 
beneficial to many besides those in the 
membership of the Reformed Presbyte- 
rian church. 

The circular purports to be an amplifi- 
cation of a conversation between a mem- 
ber of ''a church that pretends to o]:)posc 
secret societies" and a member of the 
church, apparently, who is a ''Neighbor" 
of the Modern Woodmen and anxious to 
persuade his friend to become a member 
of the lodge also. 

If there be any irony intended in the 



use of the word "pretends," in the de- 
scription of the church in question, it 
does not hurt that to which I have the 
honor of belonging. I shall allow others 
to speak for themselves. 

Is It Wrong? 
The conversation is between A. and B. 
Their names in full are Mr. Arrogance 
and Browbeaten. They are both easily 
recognized. Arrogance, being on the de- 
fensive, when introduced, asks three pre- 
liminary questions : First, Is it wrong 
for a man to carry insurance on his life? 
Second, Is it wrong to help a man in 
misfortune who needs financial or other 
legitimate assistance? Third, Is it wrong 
to visit the sick and to employ nurses 
to care for them when necessary? 

These questions are so manifestly out 
of all bearing upon the case that they 
might well be passed over in silent con- 
tempt. It is as if Arrogance had asked 
his friend, Is it wrong to breathe? Is it 
wrong to eat? Is it wrong to drink? To 
all of which Browbeaten might have re- 
plied, ''Whether we eat or drink, or what- 
ever we do, w^ should do all to the glory 
of God. Whatsoever is not of faith is 
sin." The moral character of an act de- 
pends upon conditions — for one thing, on 
the motive which prompts it. Is it wrong 
for a farmer to plow his field? God 
says, "The plowing of the wicked is sin." 

Arrogance's questions, though having 
no bearing upon the subject in hand, 
were asked for a purpose, a Jesuitical 
purpose. The fivst is to give Browbeat- 
en an opportunity to acknowledge that 
the church is fallible. This is of the 
nature of an insinuation (pitiful in the 
mouth of a professing Christian) that 
the church is not a divine institution. 
This, of course, is not a correct deduc- 
tion, but it is one to which an untrained 
mind will naturally be led. The lodge 
gains by weakening confidence in, and 
regard for, the church. The second is 
asked for the sake of introducing the 
parenthetical sentence, that follows it, in 
praise of the wonderful benevolence of 
the fraternity. The character of the 
benevolence is enhanced b} the use of the 
descriptive adjective "voluntary.'' I'he 
word "Ici^itiniate" has an i1^^f;^itimate 
place and force in the .•ecv/tid question. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



In it lies the error that logicians call 
Begging the Question. It is a contempti- 
ble subterfuge. The second question is 
an appeal to the natural avarice and self- 
ishness of the human heart. 

The third is only another form of the 
second. Its object evidently is to put 
in Browbeaten's mouth an accusation of 
the church as doing nothing, in the way 
of visiting and caring for the sick, while 
at the same time excusing her on the 
ground of inability. The effect of this 
misrepresentation would be to lead men 
to gravitate towards the lodge rather 
than towards the church. The very sub- 
tlety of the old serpent is manifest in 
putting this arraignment of the church 
in the mouth of a simple-minded Chris- 
tian, in the form of an acknowledgement 
of a well-known fact. Browbeaten is 
made to say. The church would do the 
same thing if it had funds. Why should 
he be prevented from stating the well- 
known truth that the church does do the 
same thing on a very much larger scale 
than any lodge, though without sounding 
a trumpet before her, as the hypocrites 
do. 

The Cardinal Functions of Our Fra= 
ternity. 

Browbeaten, having admitted that he 
did not object to identifying with the 
lodge on the ground^ that its members 
eat and drink and breathe like the rest of 
mankind, Arrogance clinches his fists and 
squaring off at him, cries in disgust, 
''Well, what's the matter with you, then? 
I tell you these are the cardinal func- 
tions of our fraternity." In the same 
way an idolater might say to a Christian, 
You don't object to prayer? You don't 
object to a place of worship? You don't 
object to a statue? To all these points 
the Christian must reply in the negative. 
Then the poor pagan might, like Mr. 
Arrogance, cry out, 'Well, then, what 
are you down on our religion for? 
These are the cardinal constituents of 
paganism." You admire jewels? Yes. 
You like to see nice pigs? Yes. Well, 
where is your consistency in objecting 
to a jewel in a swine's snout? There is 
a consistency, just as there was in Mr. 
Browbeaten's attitude, and yet in oppo- 
sition to a secret lodge, which boasts that 
the practice of prudence and benevolence 



are its cardinal functions, though every- 
one may not be so constituted as to per- 
ceive the consistency. 

Arrogance thinks Browbeaten a very 
incomprehensible fellow because, after 
he has made him acknowledge that he 
thinks hands and feet and eyes are very 
good institutions, and he has told him 
that monkeys have hands and feet and 
eyes, he asserts that he does not care to 
take up his abode thenceforth in a mon- 
key cage. This is a simile. 

Arrogance now presses Browbeaten to 
point out objections to identifying with 
the Modern Woodmen of America, since 
he does not object to eating, drinking 
and sleeping, all of which functions are 
characteristic of Woodmen. 
Twelve Reasons. 

Browbeaten ventures to state a series 
of twelve objections. First he objects to 
the principle of secrecy as found in so- 
called secret and private societies. Ar- 
rogance happens to know that he has 
not conscientiously acted up to this prin- 
ciple. He casts it up to him. He can 
not beat us all with that ugly stick, how- 
ever. Browbeaten ought to have ac- 
knowledged the corn and said, 'T re- 
pent of my sin." He does not do this, 
but begins to flounder in the mud. 

His second objection is a limitation. 
He expects fraternities that are of too 
frivolous a character to be mistaken for 
religious institutions. He has found 
lodge men sometimes infatuated enough 
to think they could be saved in the lodge 
and needed no other religion. Arrogance 
then says the fraternity for which he is 
an agent is not of the class his friend 
condemns. It has no religious services 
in opening or closing meetings, and rec- 
ognizes the church as exclusive in the 
field of religion. 

Now many societies open and close 
their meetings with religious services 
without any danger of being mistaken 
for rivals of the church. It is not the 
fact that some lodges open and close in 
this way that leads to their being so re- 
garded. That the fraternity in question 
recognizes the church as exclusive in the 
field of religion can only be admitted if 
we consent to a ridiculous narrowing 
down of the field of religion. The Chris- 
tian cannot consent. Christ defines the 



May, 1000. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



limits of that field. Third, Browbeaten 
objects to the part the l6dge takes in fu- 
nerals. He thinks that it here infringes 
on the sphere of the church, and prac- 
tically claims to be a religious society in 
rivalry with the church. Had he read 
the ritual of the Modern Woodmen he 
might also very reasonably have objected 
to the copious and irreverent quotations 
of Scripture used in their ceremonies, as 
savoring of the spirit of their heathen 
ancestry. 

But what he does object to is their 
mountebank mock solemn ser.vices at fu- 
nerals. Had he looked over the revised 
ritual of the order he would have found 
several pages taken up with funeral cere- 
monies, which if they do not prove it a 
rival of the church in religion, at least 
prove it a very irreverent and blas- 
phemous society, that would go deliber- 
ately into the presence of the death of 
one w^hom they have ridden on their 
lodge goat, taught to prostitute the oath, 
to violate the law of God by foreswear- 
ing themselves, to degrade their manhood 
in the same act, to descend to the puerili- 
ties of their initiation ceremonies, in 
which even death, which is now a fact, 
was made the subject of ribald jest, and 
proceed, in the face of grief-stricken 
relatives, to repeat their memorized plati- 
tudes, repeating also solemn words of 
Scripture, and endeavoring to improve 
upon them by the omission of the refer- 
ence to Jesus Christ as the Lord from 
heaven, as a person not suitable to be 
recognized in a lodge religion, and then 
contradict the Scripture by teaching Uni- 
tarianism, with a Creator and no 
Saviour, and Universalism, declaring the 
future happiness of all men, and con- 
fidently declaring that the deceased 
'Woodman — even if an unbeliever — is 
safe in the glories of his Maker. 

Members of lodges appear to die only 
to afford the members of their order an 
opportunity to display themselves on 
dress parade, by way of advertising the 
order. The only way for a man to es- 
cape this contemptuous mockery in death 
is to abandon all such institutions in 
life. 

Arrogance likes a minister of religion 
to be present, to take a place secondary 
to the order; if a member of the lodge, 



so much the better, as an advertising and 
by the way of showing the inferiority of 
the church to the fraternity, for the Head 
Consul of the order in the introduction 
to the revised edition of the ritual, 1894, 
declares that Woodmen put nothing but 
home and country before the order. It 
is next to home and country in their 
hearts. Therefore they are either a re- 
ligious order or they think the objects for 
which Christ established the church are 
of less moment than the selfish ends of 
the fraternity. 

No self-respecting, not to say God- 
honoring, minister of religion would con- 
sent to officiate where a lodge takes pre- 
cedence of the church, and places itself 
among the mourners as though its bonds 
were closer and more tender than those 
of the church,- whose members are taught 
to behave themselves with modesty and 
decorum upon such a solemn occasion, 
unless they happen to be members of 
some lodge as well as of the church, in 
which case Saturnalian rights are accord- 
ed them, because they are supposed to be 
possessors of a lodge religion, whose dei- 
ties are Selfishness and Vanity. 

Fourth. Browbeaten objects to men 
taking obligations before they know 
what they are going to take. Of course, 
as a Christian, he knows it to be con- 
trary to the law of God. As a reasonable 
being he sees that it is capable of being 
used as a menace to society. As a stu- 
dent of history he knows it has in fact 
been often so employed. As a man he 
knows it is degrading to manhood. He 
should also have objected to the profanity 
of unauthorized persons administering 
the oath — a prostitution of a divine ordi- 
dance. Arrogance points out that the 
consciences of over a million men have 
been sufficiently searched to permit them 
to foreswear themselves in contravention 
of the divine law without compunctions. 
This reveals a deplorable state of public 
morals, and is a matter to be inquired 
into by the state, for public morality is 
essential to the strength and stability of 
the State. ''Righteousness exalteth a na- 
tion, but sin is a disgrace to any people. 

Arrogance also attacks Browljcaten in 
a cowardly way by pointing to his hav- 
ing formerly connected himself with a 
society which required him to commit 



10 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May. 1909. 



this sin. His doctrine is that a man by 
once doing wrong is thenceforth exempt 
from every moral law. But our common 
proverb says, "Two wrongs do not make 
a right." 

Fifth. Browbeaten objects to initia- 
tions. They are known to be always sil- 
ly, often brutal, and sometimes fatal. Ar- 
rogance could not say that Browbeaten 
had never had any experience to justify 
his condemnation, so he partially ac- 
quiesces, yet maintains that they do con- 
tain many valuable suggestions. Having 
gone carefully through the initiatory ex- 
ercises of the Woodmen as described in 
their official ritual, to discover some of 
the valuable suggestions, and having 
found no trace of any, I would suggest 
that every self-respecting man keep him- 
self aloof from all connection with all 
such degrading folly. One must expect 
to ride to fame on something else than 
an undulating lodge goat, with its un- 
even wheels, and mischief-loving opera- 
tor. Browbeaten's objection cannot but 
come with force to Christians who desire 
to walk worthy of their holy vocation. 
There are probably no others to whom 
the participation in the worst forms of 
rowdyism will appear otherwise than as 
a very venial sin, if a sin at all. So Ar- 
rogance, in spite of Browbeaten's views, 
will as a good Woodman, "keep the logs 
a-rolling, boys, and pile them high and 
dry." 

Browbeaten's next object is to the 
signs and passwords. This is contained 
in fact in his first objection, to the prin- 
ciple, secrecy, which was misstated by 
Arrogance, as an objection to secrets. 
Solomon said in his day that a wicked 
man winks with his eyes, speaks with 
his feet and teaches with his fingers. Ar- 
rogance attempts a faint defense of the 
signs and the pass words, to which 
Browbeaten might have replied by point- 
ing out that such are not employed by 
those who are insured in a non-secret 
company. The ground of objection, how- 
ever, lies really in that they are essential 
to carrying out an un-Christian principle 
of secrecy. 

Browbeaten's seventh objection is to 
going into the lodge to help a certain 
gang when any right-hearted man would 
from mere principles of humanity delight 



in aiding any fellow-being who is iti 
need. Arrogance adds to this that it is 
especially a duty enjoined on all Chris- 
tians. Arrogance is here compelled to 
withdraw his former boastful claim of 
charity and benevolence for the lodge^ 
and admits, what every intelligent man 
knows, that their charity is only that of 
any business corporation, and that it can- 
not, like the church of Christ, be ex- 
pected to extend its ministrations beyond 
members and their families. So the field 
of disinterested charity and benevolence 
is abandoned to the church as its proper 
sphere. Arrogance, however, claims that 
the lodge is likely to make a man more 
charitable and thus prove helpful to the 
church. Observation will not confirm this 
claim. The charity the church wants is 
that which springs from the love of God 
shed abroad .in the heart by the Holy 
Ghost. This charity is not fostered by 
the lodges, which seem never to have 
heard that there is a Holy Ghost. 

Eighth. Browbeaten objects to lodges 
dabbling in politics." Arrogance agrees 
that it is not right, but insists that the 
Woodmen do not. Browbeaten is wrong 
in this case, at least ; let me explain, if 
it ought not to be in politics it is be- 
cause, for some reason, its influence is 
necessarily bad there. In this Browbeat- 
en and Arrogance are agreed. They rec- 
ognize a fact, but not the reason for it. 
It lies in Browbeaten's first objection. 
The principle of secrecy is wrong. "A 
corrupt tree cannot bring forth good 
fruit." If the lodges have a right to 
exist they have a right to be in politics 
up to the neck, and not merely to ''dab- 
ble/' It is more than a right, it is their 
duty. The church is in politics, and that 
by the appointment of Christ. If the 
lodge, in politics, is a menace to free 
government — and it is, because of its 
principle of secrecy — it only proves that 
it is an institution hostile to good gov- 
ernment and it ought to be suppressed. 

Browbeaten's ninth objection is that 
lodge members warn and advise one an- 
other. As stated it is sufficiently trifiing 
to pass over without comment, members 
of all associations may warn and advise 
one another. Browbeaten probably has 
reference* however, to the well-known 
fact that many members of. lodges are 



Jlay, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



11 



criminals and aid one another in escaping 
the dutches of the law and defeat the 
ends of justice; also to the fact that they 
often help one another into positions that 
ought to be held by better men, and so 
perpetrate many wrongs on society. All 
this lies in Browbeaten's first objection. 
The danger is in the principle of secrecy. 

The tenth objection is to the great 
number of bad men in the fraternities. 
Arrogance retorts that there are hypo- 
crites in the church. They do not have 
to act the hypocrite in the lodge, nor very 
much in lodge-affected churches. The 
more's the pity. A bad man is just as 
g'ood a lodge man as a good man. Ar- 
rogance thinks the best men may be im- 
postors and the worst may have prince- 
ly hearts. Truly if the associations of 
the lodge are responsible for such an 
opinion and utterance, for such an utter 
perversion of mind and inversion of rea- 
son one should, as he values his life, be- 
ware of lodge influence. 

Browbeaten's eleventh objection to the 
lodges is on the ground that they are 
much spoken against. Many warnings 
are uttered against them. The fact is 
brought out that the best men and pur- . 
est churches are hostile to these institu- 
tions. Among those who condemn them 
are many distinguished and pious men 
who have been in their membership, and 
w^hom a tender and enlightened con- 
science has compelled to separate from 
them. Not a few such witnesses against 
the lodges have been put to death by 
those lodges from which they have seced- 
ed, on the charge of perjury and viola- 
tion of lodge obligations, and so the 
lodges themselves have become vouchers 
for the truth of the testimony of these 
martyrs. I haye never known the case 
of a bad man condemning the lodge, but 
I have, like Mr. Browbeaten, found thou- 
sands of the best of men, the very salt of 
the earth, condemning it strongly. But 
Arrogance says outside testimony 
amounts to nothing, as long as the lodges 
do not condemn themselves you may be 
sure they are all right ! He claims that 
the safest way to judge any one accused 
of a crime is to accept his own testimony 
of himself rather than the testimony of 
witnesses. Thus the tendency of the 



lodge, and even a fraternity, like the 
Woodmen, which is by no means the 
worst of secret societies, is towards an- 
archy and chaos. 

Browbeaten's twelfth objection is only 
a restatement in another form of his 
tenth. It is to the prevalence of a bad 
element in the lodge, and the necessary 
association with bad men, on a footing 
of equality, as being your fit and worthy 
companions. The unconscious introduc- 
tion of this point twice shows how much 
it had been weighing on the mind of the 
writer of the circular. But Arrogance 
retorts again upon the church. This is 
what we used to term a "honeyman" in 
college, and its use was regarded as un- 
manly. But Arrogance uses it. He 
says, 

"What if There Are Bad Men in the 

Lodges?" 

'They are found even in the church/' 
But the fact remains that had men are 
impostors in the church. They are not 
impostors in the lodge. They have to 
make a pretense of decency to retain 
membership in the church, none to re- 
tain membership in a lodge. Arrogance 
defends membership in a lodge in which 
bad men are too much in evidence on 
the ground that we have to live in a 
world full of bad men. Well, I do not 
think the fact that there are a g-reat 
many nasty women in the world in which 
we have to live, need serve as an argu- 
ment with a decent man for marrying 
one of them. In the church you have to 
be, or else violate a divine command. 
Arrogance strangely overlooks the fact 
that lodges are voluntary associations, 
and that the church is not. He goes into 
a lodge of his own choice. He goes into 
the church as a duty laid upon him by 
Christ. Those who stand aloof from 
the church must some time give an ac- 
count for their attitude of separation as 
a sin. But the judge of all the earth 
will never lay it as a sin to any man that 
he has not mocked the oath, foresworn 
himself, ridden on a lodge goat, or made 
a contemptible fool of himself in any 
of the thousand and one ways known to 
secret society men. Arrogance claims 
that he and his friend came out of a se- 
cret society as good as they went in. 



12 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



They took a great risk of coming out 
worse than they went in. 

Arrogance says the fraternity does Hke 
the church, tries to pick out good men. 
This reveals a strange misconception of 
the mission of the church. The church 
goes to the world, to the chief of sin- 
ners, becoming an agent in their con- 
version, receiving into its membership 
those who renounce their former course 
and profess faith in the Lord Jesus 
Christ. By means of the church God 
takes men out of the kingdom of Satan 
and brings them into the kingdom of his 
dear Son. The lodge has never been 
known to make a bad man good. In so 
far as it picks out good men it picks out 
those whom the church has made good, 
and its very touch as it picks them out 
pollutes them, and they never recover 
their virgin purity so long as they remain 
in its connection. 

"There Is No Secret." 
The writer of the circular now takes 
leave of A. and B. and speaks in his own 
proper person. In large capitals he as- 
sures us that there is no secret in the 
Woodmen's society that is such for fear 
of the lazv, or because it would embar- 
rass the members if the secret were 
made public. No amount of vociferation 
proves anything. What does the testi- 
mony of an anonymous writer amount 
to, anyway? And what estimation should 
we put on the testimony of a man who 
admits having placed himself under 
bonds to conceal secrets before they were 
revealed to him? 

The writer thinks there is nothing ob- 
jectionable even to a Christian in the do- 
ings of a Modern Woodmen's camp. I 
have shown that besides many other 
things, the very first obligation is a vio- 
lation of Christian morality, ^^he 
word of God is explicit. Thou shalt not 
foreswear thyself. Even the worldly ad- 
vantages promised by lodges are often 
delusive. They often give ostentatious- 
ly, in the name of ch?.r.ity, where there 
is no need, simply as an advertisement, 
as a bait to enrich the order. They just 
as often, and oftener, crawl out of pay- 
ing just dues where there is need, but 
the claims can be set aside with impunity. 
Secret societies are of two general 
classes, those in which the element of 



folly predominates, and those in which 
other forms of wickedness predominate. 
The Woodmen claim to exist for the 
purpose of providing for the sick and 
the afflicted and for the families of the 
dead. God promises to do this for His 
children. They can rely upon His prom- 
ise. The circular intimates that the 
church's funds are insufficient to do what 
good she would desire. If the tithes 
were brought into God's storehouse the 
church would have no lack of funds, and 
church members who pay lodge dues 
with greater punctuality than they do 
their tithes to the church, are robbing 
God. As a matter of fact, in so far as 
lodges can claim to be charitable, they 
are so in imitation of the church, and 
all their boasted charity is not a drop 
in the bucket, in comparison with that 
of the church. 

The lodge's so-called charity often par- 
alyzes industry, economy, and trustful 
confidence in God. Christians, who work 
and save, can do better with their money 
than the lodges can. No! A Christian 
needs not to be unequally yoked togeth- 
er with unbelievers, or to hide his light 
.under a lodge bushel, in order to be 
cared for in sickness and old age. 

The circular closes with a strong ap- 
peal to men to join the Modern Wood- 
men. Those who think of doing so 
should seek further light than they can 
get from members of the order. They 
should at least provide themselves with 
a copy of the ritual — which they can do 
at a trifling expense. There is probably 
not a secret society in existence whose 
secrets have not been published, and are 
easily accessible. There is no excuse for 
men going into them blindly. 

We cannot hope to appeal successful- 
ly to any but Chrigrtians' against the 
lodges on the ground of their moral 
character. But no Christian should be 
in doubt as to how he should stand in 
relation to a secret society, no matter 
what its name and object. ''Come out 
from among them and be ye separate" 
is the divine command. Trust God to 
make provision for you and He will not 
in old age cast you off, or try to get 
you off His roll, when the infirmities 
of years prevent you from gaining a live- 
lihood, as secret insurance societies too 



May, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 



13 



often do. Trust Him who has said, 
''To old age I am He and to hoar hairs 
I will carry you," and goodness and 
mercy shall follow you all your life. His 
promises are all yea and amen in Christ 
Jesus. 

Wahoo, Neb., Sept. lo, 1908. 

PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

Fathers and Brethren : I have often re- 
minded you in these letters that the lodge 
movement is simply a heathen religion 
planted in a Christian country. In this 
connection it has been my duty to call 
your attention to the fact that in idol- 
atrous festivals lascivious dancing has al- 
ways played a prominent part. I think 
that the reputable men who have been 
fooled into the orders and who seldom 
attend their meetings have at times found 
it difficult or impossible to believe this 
statement so far as their own lodges are 
concerned. In support of the doctrine 
laid down I submit the following note 
taken from a recent publication. It was 
found in an ordinary daily paper and is 
in no sense an attack on the lodge sys- 
tem. It simply shows what lodges are 
doing and how the thousands of men who 
frequent them are spending their nights. 
Those who were not present at the 
Wednesday night smoker of the Modern 
Woodmen of America are anxiously in- 
quiring about the doings there and some 

300 odd men who were there are saying 
as little as possible. Some of those who 
never have been known to miss one of 
of these entertainments before are de- 
claring strenuously to family friends that 
they were unable to attend the smoker. 
Meanwhile the women of Hammond 
have their ears to the ground and are 
waiting. 

A Salome dance was announced on the 
printed program of the evening's enter- 
tainment, to be performed by a miss of 
Chicago. But the question that has 
aroused the curiosity of the townspeople 
is: "What was her costume?" One man 
says her costume beggars description, 



while another declares there was nothing 
to describe. 

The entertainment committee pleads 
that there was no intention to have any- 
thing out of the ordinary, but that it was 
powerless to stop the crowd. 

This account put into English means 
that a company of men to the number 
of about three hundred got together for 
a smoker and had as part of the enter- 
tainment a dance by a woman who was 
nearly or quite naked. Of course, in a 
secret order such an event will take place 
as often as the men who attend wish 
it. This is the difference between a se- 
cret and an open society. In the one 
you are likely to have such entertain- 
ments at any time, in the other you 
never have them at all. 

No Women Wanted. 
That is, no respectable women are 
wanted. Lodgemen have always been 
embarrassed when asked why a man's 
wife or daughter might not go to lodge 
with him. The simple fact is that the 
ceremonies, the customs and the conver- 
sation are such as no worthy man would 
subject his wife to. When three hundred 
men wish to see a naked woman dancing 
they do not ask their wives to go along. 
I was talking only this week with a 
man who is a prominent member of the 
Masonic and other orders. . He is a busi- 
ness man, a Christian professor and is 
happily married to a lovely wife. As 
is almost invariably the case, we had 
been talking only a few moments before 
he began to say that he did not often 
go to the lodges, and speaking of one,, 
which is specially addicted to such dances 
as are referred to above, he said that he 
did not attend that one at all. 

In this connection it is fittinq- to men- 
tion a letter which came to our Secre- 
tary recently. A husband writes that 
his wife has become a member of the or- 
der of the Eastern Star. He wishes ta 



1^ 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



know what obligations she has taken and 
sends money for a ritual of that lodge. 
This casts a broad light on the question 
of the lodge influence on the home. Here 
is a wife who unites with a secret order 
and her husband does not know what she 
is obligated to. Either she will not tell 
him or he is unable to believe what she 
says. In this dilemma he writes to our 
society to gain the desired information. 
Of course, he has a right to know all the 
facts in the" case, but no more right than 
a wife has, whose husband is a member 
of an order to which she has not access. 
As was said in a recent address : "When 
a man or a woman unites with a secret 
order, of which the partner is not a mem- 
ber, it is an incipient divorce." 

Lodge Influence in the Courts. 

All adhering lodgemen deny that se- 
cret orders are used to manipulate courts 
of justice. When a man is ready to say 
that the orders are in a conspiracy to de- 
feat civil law he is ready to step out of 
"his secret society. It is obvious, how- 
ever, that a lodgeman in difficulty with 
the courts, will use his lodge member- 
ship if he can. Why not? What is his 
order good for if he cannot use it at 
such a time? 

That it is so used, the testimony of Al- 
len Pinkerton and other officers abun- 
dantly proves. From time to time we 
see in the papers items that show the 
hidden work of these orders. Take for 
example the following: 

Attorney Robert E. Cantwell, charged 
with conspiracy to defeat justice in a 
Chinese murder trial, was accused yes- 
terday of striking up an acquaintanceship 
with Ernest Larson, one of the venire- 
men called in the case now before Judge 
McEwen. As a result the State assigned 
special detectives to keep close tab on the 
twelve jurors finally impaneled. After 
the selection of the jury court adjourned 
until to-morrow morning, when the tak- 
ing of testimony will begin. 



During the examination of Larson, As- 
sistant State's Attorney Popham asked: 

''Do you know the defendant?" 

*'No, except for a few minutes' con- 
versation I had with him this morning," 
Larson replied. ''Just before court 
opened he introduced himself and be- 
gan discussing different lodges." 

"What lodges did you discuss?" 

"The Masons and the Elks. We talked 
about the class of men that belonged. 
That was about all." 

"You are a member of a lodge to 
which he belongs, are you not?" 

"Yes." 

Larson was excused. 

You will observe that, according to 
this testimony, there was nothing said 
by either of these two people which was 
objectionable. The man charged with 
crime talked with the juryman to whom 
he had introduced himself about lodges ; 
What was the harm of that? It is to 
be believed in the absence of testimony 
to the contrary that they talked of the 
thing that was at issue, that is, of the 
trial of the lodge brother, but they do 
not say this, only that they were talking, 
of lodges and of the nice men who be- 
longed to them. 

,Ypu will also observe that there was 
no hesitation about the matter on the 
part of the court; the juror was at once 
excused. Why so? Or why was he not 
questioned regarding the conversation 
and allowed to remain on the jury in 
case he should declare that all the talk 
he had with the indicted man was on 
general lines and unobjectionable from 
a legal standpoint. The reason is obvi- 
ous ; the court knew that the two lodge 
men were talking about the case and 
that it was not safe to have the one lodge 
man on the jury to try the other. 

But suppose the two lodge men had not 
been seen in conference, or suppose that 
the person seeing them had not known 
that they were lodge men, or suppose 
that he had been so much a lodge man 



May, 1009. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



15 



that he was unwilHng to raise the ques- 
tion before the court, what then? The 
fact is that no man's Ufe or property or 
reputation is safe in a country where se- 
cret societies exist. I do not remember 
who said that a secret order was a con- 
spiracy against all not connected with it, 
but it is true ; not because there are not 
worthy men in lodges, but because the 
good men are at home while the other 
sort run the orders. It is also clear that 
the man who needs to be watched will 
understand the value of secrecy and em- 
ploy it, while the other will not even sus- 
pect what is going forward until it is 
done. 

The Death Struggle of the Lodge. 

You will remember the quotation at 
the beginning of this article concerning 
the Woodmen's smoker and the dancing 
by the naked woman. Please put along- 
side that the following extract sent out 
by the head clerk of the order: 

*'My Dear Sir — This Society, at the 
present time, is making a careful investi- 
gation of the work of various local club 
organizations — literary, social, musical, 
scientific, civics, benevolent, patriotic, 
domestic science, social science, philan- 
thropic, etc., with the idea of determin- 
ing the value of these respective lines of 
endeavor to the masses of the people, and 
working out carefully a program of work 
along these various lines, that may be 
employ,ed by our 13,000 local organiza- 
tions.''' 

It is not long since, in this correspond- 
ence, attention was directed to the fact 
that these lodges were attempting to do 
something in the line of real social uplift 
in order to justify their existence. Men 
even of a low type will grow weary of 
the dreary round of the initiation cere- 
monies and will remain away unless there 
can be something devised to hold them. 
Hence these attempts to arrange such 
programs as have been used by open or- 
ganizations for centuries. Do the orders 



get up these entertainments to benefit the 
people ? Certainly not ; they get them up 
to help the lodge to live. Just as they 
put out the liquor drinking when they 
will lose members if they do not do so. 

This is no new thing under the sun. 
Temperance, patriotism, love of family 
and kindly regard for men have all been 
hitched to the car of secretism. As my 
honored father used to say, this is not 
because these virtues need the help of 
secrecy, but because secrecy needs the 
help of these virtues. And always we 
should remember that such false pre- 
tenses not only fail to promote the so- 
cial graces named, but they tend to break 
down the whole moral character, and 
make the man a mere bundle of hypoc- 
risy. 

Thank God and Take Courage. 

Some one has said that ''hypocrisy is 
the tribute which vice pays to virtue."" 
It is this and more. It is the token of 
its coming dissolution. All these efforts 
to -make it appear that secrecy has some 
real good to do in the world and the 
never ending canvass for members show 
that the end is not far distant. "Soon 
will our Saviour from heaven appear."" 
And when He comes the Beast, that is,, 
godless government, and the False 
Prophet, that is, all forms of christless 
religion, will be cast into the lake of fire. 
It will be a thousand years after that 
before the devil is cast into that fiery 
heat, but there will never be a godless 
government or a christless church on 
earth after Our Lord Jesus Christ comes. 
We are living in the last days and must 
be faithful until the end. "Therefore,, 
my beloved brethren, be ye steadfast, un- 
movable, always abounding in the work 
of the Lord, inasmuch as ye know that 
your labor is not in vain in the Lord." 

Faithfully yours, 
; Charles A. Blanchard. 



16 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH AND HER 
GREATST ENEMY. 

BY REV. ENOS H. HESS. 

That the Christian church should have 
an enemy is scriptural ; as in the first 
promise of a Saviour by God there is in- 
cluded the promise of enmity. (Gen. 
3:15.) The greatest enemy will be a 
subject for future discussion. In order 
to determine correctly what the enemy 
is we must first see what the genuine is 
and on what it depends. In Isa. 53:1-6, 
we have a pen picture of the Saviour — 
the foundation of the Christian church 
— and the attitude of men in general to- 
ward Him — ''He was despised andj'eject- 
ed of men." When we look at the in- 
difference and even opposition to Christ 
and His work at present, we must believe 
that the world has not changed much in 
its attitude toward Him since His com- 
ing into the world. 

''The stone which the builders refused 
is become the head stone of the corner." 
(Psa. 118:22; Matt. 21:42.) The Jews, 
and more particularly the Pharisees, were 
builders of the then dominant spiritual 
house, and how dearly did they reject 
Him who should have been their chief 
corner-stone. "And whosoever shall fall 
on this stone shall be broken ; but on 
whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind him 
to powder." (Matt. 21:44.) Very clear- 
ly is the coming to Christ a breaking 
process of our selfhood, but His coming 
judgment will be a destroying — grind- 
ing process. (Jude 14, 15.) Saints 
meet their judgment in coming to Christ 
— repentance and all its attendant parts 
— and assist in the judgment of those 
who in their day of grace — life — reject 
Him. 

The "must," to this, is given by Peter 
through the power of the Holy Ghost in 
Act^ 4:11-12. Thus a salvation prom- 
ised without Christ as the chief corner- 
stone is a counterfeit and will not stand 
in the day of final accounts. In John 
10:1-15 we have Christ picturing Him- 
self as the door to the sheep fold — 
lieaven, and also as the Chief Shepherd, 
and any one that would gain entrance 
to heaven except through Him becomes 
a thief and robber. The Father hath 
-committed all judgment unto the Son 
and therefore if we make not our peace 



with the Son can we expect a better fate 
than that of the fallen angels? (Jude 
6.) We may do reverence and appar- 
ently honor the Father, but if we reject 
and dishonor the Son as did the Jews we 
shall all likewise perish. Christ expects 
us to honor and openly confess Him be- 
fore our fellowmen and then will He also 
be willing to own and confess us before 
the heavenly Father. (Matt. 10:32, 33.) 
"With the heart man believeth unto 
righteousness and with the mouth con- 
fession is made unto salvation." Sign- 
ing a card and joining a church may be 
considered as meeting this requirement, 
but in nature we have "still born" chil- 
dren and birth for them means burial — 
no life. The corollary to this in the 
spiritual world is described in Jno. 
1:12-14. Joining the church does not 
give a passport to heaven. , Accompa- 
nied therewith must be the creative fiat 
of God, "Let there be" in him or her 
a new creation— a new life. Church 
membership should stand for spiritual 
life — right living. If it does not then it 
only becomes our spiritual burial place. 
I fear many so-called Christians or 
church members will awake in the sec- 
ond resurrection and hear the awful sum- 
mons, "depart from me ye workers of 
iniquity, I never knew you." 

Matt. 25:31-46 gives us a picture of 
the judgment and we see there that 
the rewards are a surprise to the worthy 
ones and the punishments a disappoint- 
ment to the condemned ones. Further 
we see in it the thought from those con- 
demned that they were, while in life, do- 
ing those things that would earn for 
them salvation. That charitable deeds 
were done by them while in life we are 
ready to believe, but they failed to do 
them in the name and for the honor of 
Christ — hence losing the reward. 

From the foregoing we conclude there- 
fore that the Christian church depends 
upon Jesus Christ as her chief corner- 
stone, and is made up of individuals who 
have been spiritually born and thencefor- 
ward walked in all the light revealed to 
them through the Word and Holy 
Spirit. 

Should we find individuals, or a col- 
lection of individuals, that build for 
themselves a spiritual house, and conse- 



May, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



17 



qiiently a passport to heaven 'without in- 
chiding Christ and His- atonement in 
such building and taking for a substitute 
their good works and Hves, we would, 
in my mind, have a great enemy to the 
cause of Christ. But you ask, Do we 
have such individuals or organizations? 
I answer, Yes. Who and what are they ? 
Secret orders as a rule in general, and 
Free Masons and Odd Fellows in par- 
ticular. Members in these organizations 
will tell you that if they live up to their 
rules and regulations it is sufficient to in- 
sure them heaven when they die. Their 
burial ritual says that the departed broth- 
-er has left the lodge hexe ^pn earth to 
be in the grand lodge above. Their mem- 
bers will tell you that all. their work is 
founded on the Bible, but when they. use 
II. Thess. 3:6-12 and I. Pet. 2:5, and 
come to the name of Jesus Christ, they 
let it out and in all other passages used 
by them in which the narrie of Jesus 
Christ appears. His name is cut out. 
What an enemy ! What a counterfeit ! 
The lodge has no confession of sin, no 
atonement through the blood of Christ, 
110 Holy Spirit. These cardinals are the 
essentials to our religion and we think 
that without them there is no salvation. 
But we hear them say that Masonry or 
Odd fellowship, as the case may be, is 
good enough religion for me. Others of 
their number deny its being a religion, 
but if Free Masonry is not a religion, 
Avhy does it have an ''altar, a creed, and 
a ritual?" The language of the rulers 
of the order confirms the impression pro- 
duced by its secret and public work. 
Mackey, in his Ritualist, page 22, speak- 
ing of a candidate for Masonry, says : 
"''There he stands on the threshold of his 
new Masonic life, in darkness, helpless- 
ness and ignorance. Having been wan- 
dering amid the errors and covered with 
the pollutions of the outer qr profane 
world, he comes inquiringly to our doors 
seeking the new birth and the removal of 
the veil which hides divine truth from 
his uninitiated sight." What about a 
minister of the gospel who makes such 
an acknowledgment ? In his Lexicon, de- 
fining the word accacian, he says that the 
word signifies "A Mason who by living 
in strict accord with his obligations, is 



free from sin." IVIackey's Lexicon, p. 
16. Oliver says on the same word: 
"When the Master Mason exclaims, My 
name is Cassia, it is equivalent to say- 
ing, I have been in the grave. I have 
triumphed over it by rising from the 
dead and being regenerated in the proc- 
ess, I have a claim to life everlasting." 
Cyclopaedia of Freemasonry, p. 48. To 
the same effect Morris says on the third 
degree : "We thus find man complete in 
morality and intelligence, with the stay 
of religion added to insure him the pro- 
tection of deity and guard him against 
ever going astray, -nor is it possible to 
conceive of anything more which the soul 
of man requires." It requires no argu- 
ment to show that Masons who believe 
these statements and love Masonry will 
care little, if anything, about the Chris- 
tian church. 

Much is said of lodge charity of which 
there is .some just ground, but inasmuch 
as it is done in the name of the lodge 
and not in the name of Christ, it 
clearly receives the ban of the twenty- 
fifth chapter of IMatthew, as already re- 
ferred to. "Inasmuch as ye did it not 
to one of the least of these, (his breth- 
ren) ye did it not to me." We must ad- 
mit that the church does not in all in- 
stances adequately provide for its poor. 
The professed superiority of lodge char- 
ity is generally of a selfish nature and 
seldom goes beyond the confines of its 
own oath-bound circle. What about the 
millions given annually by the church for 
missions and charitable purposes in the 
name of Christ ? This, in many instances 
regardless of creed, color or sex. Lodges 
are charitable among themselves, but 
exclude the lame, halt and blind and all 
such who are likely to need charity and 
cannot promptly pay their dues. 

Another evil phase of the lodge is the 
blood-curdling oaths to secrecy demand- 
ed of its members. The third degree of 
Masonry binds the applicant to secrecy 
with no less penalty than to be willing 
to have his body cut in twain and bow- 
els burnt to ashes and promises to pro- 
tect his worthy brother in all cases ex- 
cept treason and murder. However, in 
the seventh, or Royal Arch Degree, trea- 
son and murder are not excepted. To 
which oath does such an individual re- 



18 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



main true, when serving as a juror, 
judge or official of the government? The 
ease by which many present-day crim- 
inals go "scott free" answers the ques- 
tion. Claims may be made that the lodge 
oaths are mere forms, and are never car- 
ried out, but sixteen well authenticated 
cases of lodge murders are on record. 
William Morgan, in 1826, is one instance, 
and forty thousand left Masonry at that 
time as a result. 

The only clear and clean way for a 
Christian in respect to lodges is separa- 
tion. (II. Cor. 6:14-18.) However, the 
proper attitude of the church toward the 
lodges has been a burning question in 
many denominations and we find it is 
making inroads into our own beloved 
brotherhood. From those present at last 
year's conference we learn that a lodge 
substitute was suggested by a brother. As 
to a suitable substitute for the lodge, at 
least in its social aspect, we believe there 
is nothing better than a good weekly spir- 
itual prayer meeting after the order of 
I. Cor. 14:26. If there are those within 
the church that do not enjoy such serv- 
ice, and insist on a substitute such as 
the lodge, the quicker the power of ex- 
communication is carried out the better 
it will be for the church. 

The financial aspect can be fully met 
by every member heeding the advice of 
the Apostle Paul to the Corinthian 
church. (I. Cor. 16:2.) If there is not 
enough love in the heart of the believ- 
ers to prompt such service voluntarily, 
we question the advisability of making 
rules -and regulations by which they shall 
be Compelled to give of their store for 
the other's good. However, Scripture 
gives a method by which the Lord's treas- 
ury shall be replenished. In the Old 
Testament it was the tithe. If there is 
any change for the New it certainly is not 
any less. (Matt. 23:23; Rom. 12:1.) 

At a ministerial conference of a certain 
denomination eighty per cent of the min- 
isters present were Free Masons. Let 
us beware lest a like fate befall us. By 
countenancing the lodge, be the member 
rich, influential or otherwise, we are tak- 
ing a step in the wrong direction. 

What consistency is there in a minister 
who professes to preach Christ in the 
pulpit and belongs to an organization that 



forbids the use of His name? Thus to 
me it seems that the secret lodge system 
is the greatest present day enemy to the 
Christian church. Enos H. Hess. 



THE LODGE APPEALS FOR HELP. 

Calls Upon Congress to Prevent 
Exposures. 

We call your attention to a bill intro- 
duced by Mr. Gaines of Tennessee, 'To 
prevent the fraudulent use of the mail in 
matters concerning duly authorized se- 
cret orders and societies," and which was 
referred to the Committee on the Post- 
office and Post Roads of the House of 
Representatives, but which was not re- 
ported back, and hence is dead. 

Read the bill carefully. It is one of 
the most significant testimonies to the 
influence of the thousands of ministers 
in saving their congregations from these 
Satanic lodge traps, and of their ability 
in rescuing those who have been en- 
snared. Pastors have been strong be- 
cause they have had the facts. They 
knew the character of the lodges. They 
possessed the exposure. Their teaching 
has been convincing. It is of interest 
also because it reveals the uneasiness of 
the Lodge. It smarts under opposition 
and the distribution of exposures among 
the people. 



IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTA- 
TIVES, 
February 8, 1909. 

Mr. Gaines of Tennessee introduced 
the following bill, which was referred 
to the Committee on the Postoffice and 
Post Roads and ordered to be printed. 

A BILL 
To prevent the fraudulent use of the maif 
in matters concerning duly authorized 
secret orders and societies. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives of the United States 
of America, in Congress assembled, That 
it shall be unlawful for any person, firm 
or corporation to deposit or cause to be 
deposited in the mails, or send or cause 
to be sent, or print or cause to be print- 
ed for the purpose of depositing and 
sending, or deliver or cause to be deliv- 
ered by mail, the ritual, or any part there- 
of, or rules, regulations, or works which 
are secret, of any fraternal order or so- 



May, 1009. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



10 



ciety organized by law, without the au- 
thority in writing of such order or so- 
ciety being first given ; and any person, 
firm or corporation violating the pro- 
visions of this Act shall be guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and on conviction shall be 
punished by a fine of not less than one 
thousand dollars and imprisonment 
for not less than one year ; and 
proceedings may be instituted by infor- 
mation or indictment and trial had in the 
district in which the unlawful matter was 
printed for the purpose of sending, or 
was mailed, or in that in which it was 
designed to be sent, or was sent and de- 
livered. 

Sec. 2. That grand juries shall have 
inquisitory power to inquire into viola- 
tions of this Act, and any person shall 
be permitted to testify thereto of his own 
volition; and if no person offers himself 
as prosecutor in any case, , juries shall 
make return of such bill of indictment in 
the court, if found, and the court shall 
order the name of the District Attorney 
entered thereon as prosecutor ex officio. 



Such a Rill may be offered again 
and we give a form of letter, which 
ought to be sent in substance by every 
minister and reader of the Cynosure, to 
the Senator and to the Representative of 
his district, as well as to the Speaker of 
the House, Hon. Joseph G. Cannon, and 
to the presiding officer of the Senate, 
Vice-President Sherman, and to Presi- 
dent Taft, whenever such a Bill shows 
its head. 
My Dear Sir : 

I have learned that there has been in- 
troduced into the House* by Mr. Gaines 
of Tennessee a bill which, if it becomes 
a Jaw, will make it illegal to print the 
ritual or portions of the. ritual of secret 
societies for transmission through the 
mails. 

Slavery was always opposed to free 
speech, and the free press. Men were 
robbed and murdered for uttering their 
convictions in regard to that infamous 
system, which, after doing its best to de- 
stroy our government, was finally de- 
stroyed at an expense of billions of 
money and hundreds of thousands of 
lives. 

Secret societies are in some respects 



more dangerous to our country than 
slavery was. They are the natural home 
of conspiracies against all who are not 
connected with them. They secure of- 
ficial positions for their members, and 
then override the laws of the land which 
forbid crime by protecting criminals. 

This bill proposes to make it unlawful 
for self-sacrificing, public-spirited men 
to expose these secret organizations to 
the persons whom they seek to deceive 
and to defraud. 

As a citizen, believing with many oth- 
ers, that secret societies obstruct the ex- 
ecutiqn of the laws, and in the words of 
Daniel Webster, "are dangerous to the 
general cause of civil liberty and just 
government," I appeal to you. I am op- 
posed to all secret societies as hostile to 
the home, the church and to the State. I 
believe them to be sources of personal, 
social and civil corruption. I am sorry 
that such organization should be char- 
tered by our national or state govern- 
ments, it seems to me suicidal for gov- 
ernment to charter organizations which 
are by constitution secret. 

I therefore earnestly request you to 
use all your lawful powers to prevent the 
enaction of this conspiracy against a free 
press into national law. 

Yours respectfully, 



Some men make light of the cros3\ 
some ignore it, some bear it as a bur- 
den and some are crucified upon it. But 
it is one of the fixities in this world 
which men must meet. 



vSome men will not become Christians 
because they want to dictate the terms 
by, which Christ may come into their 
hearts. 



No one who is seriously seeking Christ 
in His house is seriously disturbed by 
seeming slights from men. 



From the stereotyped religious anec- 
dote many an orthodox pulpit should 
pray for deliverance. 



Lean heavy on the arm of truth an«j 
you will be led safely through the dark- 
ness. 



20 



OHRisTl AN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



8etti0 of ®ut Pori 



ANNUAL MEETING 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 
JUNE 3 AND 4, 1909. 
The annual business meeting and con- 
ference of the National Christian Associa- 
tion will occur onJ?hursd.ay and Friday, 
June 3 and 4, 1909, at 10 o'clock a. m., 
in the Belden avenue Baptist Church, 
Chicago, 111., for the election of officers 
and the transaction of other important 
business. 

C. A. BLANCHARD, President. 

N. E. KELLOGG, Recording Secretary. 



President C. A. Blanchard writes : We 
had a great meeting at Berne, Ind., and 
r inclose check for $33.32, being collec- 
tions for our Association last evening. 



MEETING IN LEE, ILLINOIS. 

On the 14th of March, I was booked 
for a lecture in Lee, 111., on Secret So- 
cieties. I arrived in due time. There 
was quite an excitement previous to the 
meeting about a rumor that the lodge 
people had secured an expert, who was 
to be on hand and make it hot for the 
country preacher. A large gathering of 
fjeople congregated at the main church 
outside of the village to take in the dis- 
cussion. Contrary to custom, the lodge 
members also came out in large num- 
.bers. 

3 At the appointed time the meeting was 
.opened by Rev. Magelson. He bade all 
welcome and stated that in order to be 
fair to all, anyone would be allowed to 
ask questions. About half an hour was 
spent in proving that outsiders can speak 
intelligently about secret orders. Sev- 
eral genuine rituals were exhibited as a 
proof of this. The story how several 
of these rituals had come out was also 
told. Manuals, Proceedings, Official Or- 
gans, catalogues from houses furnishing 
paraphernalia, etc., were shown to prove 
that outsiders can know what is going 
on within the tyled doors of lodges. 
Some time was spent in giving the his- 
tory of the orders and showing in what 
relation they stand to each other. 

Some people believe that they could 
not be Masons or Oddfellows, but that 



they can be Woodmen or Workmen, and 
at the same time be , good Christians. 
These people need tb know that Mas- 
onry is the parent of all secret organi- 
zations, and that the rituals betray the 
Masonic influence. Secret societies are 
all one great family with some difference 
in ceremonies, but with the same funda- 
mental institutions more or less, that 
promiise to bring their members to the 
Grand Lodge above. But in so doing 
they have no use for the Savior. Christ 
has no place in their system of religion. 
He cannot be tolerated. Even to pray 
in the name of Jesus is contrary to the 
principles of secretism. His name must 
be expunged from Bible passages that 
are cited as is the case with MasOns^ 
Woodmen and others. 

After two hours' discourse along the 
line mentioned an opportunity was now 
given to ask questions. The pastor ex- 
horted lodge members especially to make 
the most of the opportunity and bring 
out their objections to what was present- 
ed. After some silence an old farmer 
got up and said that now was the time to- 
speak and not wait until the lecturer 
was gone and then say that he had nbt 
spoken the truth. But silence continued 
until people got out of church. Since 
then it is stated that lodge talk has been 
the theme in Lee, 111. 
■ A Woodman was induced to come and 
see the rituals that had been used. He 
was too honest to be a real good Wood- 
man because he stated that there was 
no doubt about the genuineness of the 
Ritual. O. T. Lee. 

Editor's Note. We regret that this ver,v 
interesiing report was omitted by mistake 
from the April number. Rev. O. T. Lee is^ 
one of the best posted men on the lodge sys- 
tem in this country. • 



Last month President Blanchard gave 
an address on the "Secret Empire" in 
Winnebago, Minn. The report comes to 
us that it was a good meeting. Two Ma- 
sonic preachers were at the evening serv- 
ice. Winnebago is an educational center 
and a friend of the college there has very 
wisely provided for at least one address- 
per year before the students on Secret- 
ism. 



May, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 



21 



IMPORTANT TO LODGE PASTORS. 

Berkeley, Cal., March 3, 1909. 
Dear Brother PhilHps : 

Taking a church census of Berkeley, 
I was favored with a little inside infor- 
mation by a member of the Mission 
Lodge of Masons of San Francisco. It 
ran in this wise: I called at a certain 
house and my ring was responded to by 
the man of the house. I told him my 
business and began asking the usual 
questions. When I came to church 
preference I found he had none. As he 
was young and rather attractive look- 
ing, I could not help feeling an interest 
beyond the mere matter of getting the 
statistics. So I asked him if he had 
not been raised in the church and Sun- 
day School, to which he readily respond- 
ed that he had, and went on to tell me 
of his devout Christian mother; but, ''to 
tell the truth," said he, "I belong to the 
Masons," and from that he went on to 
tell me that Masonry, for him, answered 
the requirements of religion. 

Seeing that I had an interesting case, 
and hoping to help him, I told him of 
talks that I had had with friends of 
mine who were Masons, and especially 
on the point of there being no salvation 
without Christ, which is totally ignored 
by Masonry. One man I told him of in- 
sisted that the star, in the Masonic sym- 
bolism, stands for Christ, but when asked 
if a Jew or Mohammedan could not be 
just as good a Mason as a Christian, and 
that without acknowledging Christ, he 
was forced to admit it. 

Then my new friend, who had settled 
down on the railing of the porch oppo- 
site where I was similarly supported, de- 
livered himself as follows : He said that 
some time ago the Grand Master lec- 
tured at his lodge in San Francisco, and 
in the course of his remarks, told him 
that they had a preacher in his lodge at 
Sacramento who wanted to get the Ma- 
sons to join his church — said preacher 
representing that Masonry and the 
church were complementary one to the 
other — that the church needed Masonry 
and that Masonry needed the church. He 
told me that the Grand Master said that 
he differed from the preacher about Ma- 
sonrv needing the church, and stated it 



as his conviction that Masonry fur- 
nished about everything that a man 
needed. 

Thus my new friend was settled in the 
conviction that as a Mason he needed 
nothing from the church. 

This incident was interesting to me 
because it showed how the teachers of 
Masonry conduct themselves on the in- 
side, opposing it to the church as a self- 
sufficient institution. It also shows the 
folly of the poor lodge preacher, and 
how his efforts are flouted by the know- 
ing ones. 

Then there is the poor dupe who pins 
his faith to a Christless and Godless in- 
stitution as a substitute for the saving 
grace of Christ. Personally, I feel that 
the church has more to fear from this 
insidious foe than from any other that 
can be named. 

Very sincerely, 
Mead A. Kelsey, 
Pastor of the Friends' Church. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Prof. P. C. H., $20; Miss N. S. C, 
$1.80; Mrs. H. W. B., $6; Mrs. L. S. C, 
$5; I. C, $2; J. P. S., $5; Miss A. A. 
W., $1 ; Mrs. M. McC, $1 ; Rev. W. F. 
C, $5 ; W. I. P., $10 ; Rev. D. S. F., $1 ; 
Mrs. J. A. R., $5 ; W. I. P., 10 : A. D. C, 
$3 ; G. W. B., $5 ; Dr. N. S. C, $20 ; R. P., 
$2 ;C. S. A., $5 ;R. L. P.,$5 ;C. A. B., $10 ; 
J.J.Van W., $1 ; P.J.L., $1 ;D.B., $2 ; Rev. 
G. A. P., $5 ; 2d Ch. Ref. church, Pater- 
son, N. J., $14.30; Ch. Ref. church, 
Leighton, la., $6.80 ; Ch. Ref. church, 
Ackley, la., $7.85; ist Ch. Ref. church, 
Muskegon, Mich., $20.11; West. Ch. 
Ref. church, Grand Rapids, Mich., 
$18.15; College Church of Christ, 
Wheaton, Ilk, $27.94; ist Ch. Ref. 
church of Roseland, Chicago, $20.69; ^^^ 
Ch. Ref. church, Zealand, Mich., $25 ; 
Mennonite meeting, Berne, Ind., $3^.32. 
E. W., $5; W. B. G., $5; J. E. P., $10; 
Rev. J. S., $1 ; Mrs. N. E. K., $5 ; Rev. 
B. E. B., $1 ; F. A. W., $5 ; Mrs. J. B. 
B., $5 ; Miss N. S. C, $4.98; .Mrs. C. A. 
J., $5 ; Wm. G. H., $1 ; A. S.. $1 ; R. M. 
S.. $1 ; Miss M. M., $1 ; Mrs. T- S.. $5; 
T. P., $2; Mrs. A. R., $3, and* Rev. W. 
L F., $1. 



22 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



FROM EVANGELIST DAVIS. 

Lundy, Mo., April 7, 1909. 

Dear Sir and Brother: I have just 
started a good meeting at Flat River, 
Mo., in the great lea-d belt and lodge 
stronghold. 

What a time I have had. I began to 
preach 'The Way" and to reprove and 
rebuke, and the devil and his Orders be- 
gan to get mad and swear that they 
would kill me. It did look that way to 
some. Finally, the Order got a man 
filled with whisky to come up to me on 
the pulpit stand one night after I had 
dismissed the meeting. He said : "I want 
to talk to you." I said: "All right." "I 
am an Odd Fellow and we are not going 
to stand this. You are giving our lodge 
away, and our sins. So now we will just 
give you until noon to-morrow to get out 
of this town." It did look as though he 
was an Odd Fellow, sure enough, in- 
stead of an American citizen. I let him 
know at once that the meetings were go- 
ing on just the same and asked him to 
come and hear the truth. He went away 
and gathered a company of the same 
sort as he was — Odd Fellows. (Acts 
17:5.) On the next night he came back 
with others to hear me again, and I gave 
them rather a big dose. As soon as I 
dismissed they made a rush toward me, 
a big gang of them, with their hands in 
their pockets. It looked bad. They let 
me know that the lodges were not going 
to stand such things and that if I did not 
quit being so rough on them I would 
have to get out of the town, but if I 
would preach smooth (Isa. 30:10), it 
would be all right and they would come 
and hear me. But I let them know I 
was not preaching to please men. 

The city was filled with confusion by 
this time and the officers were called on 
to come to the meeting the next night 
and keep order, but they being of the 
same craft, did not come. The meeting 
went on just the same and the next 
night I gave them a double dose, and it 
seemed to help the Odd Fellows. They 
got quiet and after that attended the 
meetings nightly. Many of them changed 
their minds about lodges. One young 
man who came quite a distance said he 
would have to quit the lodge if he want- 



ed . to be saved. He asked to see me 
privately, which I granted, and then I 
showed him what God said about lodges. 
I read to him passages of the Scripture 
until he said : "That is enough, I am done 
with the lodge." 

I thank God for the work that is go- 
ing on. Before the meeting was over 
many of their best members quit the 
lodge. They took ofif their pins. I hope 
they will wear them no more. 

Yours in the good work, 

J. L. Davis. 



WORK IN TEXAS. 

A pastor of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South, writes: "I am just be- 
ginning the work of education of our 
people upon the Lodge in this portion of 
the country. Very few of our people 
know or are thinking about the nature 
and danger of lodges. Some of us are 
beginning to get a vision and to arouse 
ourselves to the conflict. I am very 
hopeful that God will yet lift up a stand- 
ard against these godless institutions all 
over the state. We are indeed a lodge- 
ridden state, and the saddest part of it 
is, that the large number of the preach- 
ers of the various churches beldng to 
some lodge, and more are joining every 
day. 

"You are certainly doing a great work 
with the Cynosure, your tracts and other 
literature. You may depend on my do- 
ing all I can to help you in your work." 



REV. S. A. SCARVIE IN SOUTH DAKOTA 

Upon request of my classmate. Rev. 
P. C. Birkelo, I started for South Da- 
kota to give some light on the darkness 
of Secret Societies. Sunday forenoon, 
Feb. 28, I preached in the Minnehaha 
church on the text of Christ's temptation, 
which gave me an opportunity to men- 
tion very pointedly the manner in which 
these lodges treat the Word of God. In 
the afternoon I spoke for about one and 
one-half hours on the evil of secrecy to a 
very attentive and appreciative audience, 
among which were some lodge members. 

After the lecture discussion was called 
for, but no one had any objections to of- 
fer. A number of tracts and rituals 
were disposed of, and as many more 



May. 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



23 



could have been distributed had I been 
more fully supplied. I hope the inter- 
est created will do some good, and aid 
Bro. Birkelo in his aggressive fight 
against secrecy. 

Tuesday evening, March 2, I spoke to 
the students at Lutheran Normal School, 
Sioux Falls, on the same topic. 

Yours for Christ as the Light of the 
World, S. A. Scarvie. 



SECRETARY' STODDARD'S LETTER. 



Boston, Mass., April 17, 1909. 

Dear Cynosure — It will be noticed that 
I am again at "The Hub." The ''Cradle 
of Liberty" surely needs agitating, that 
its cords be loosened. It is probably the 
most oath-bound cradle in operation. 

After the Lancaster Convention I 
spent some days in Lehigh and adjacent 
counties in Pennsylvania. Opportunity 
was found in Allentown for two ad- 
dresses in the Twelfth Street Baptist 
church. Rev. B. F. M. Fahl, pastor ; a 
sermon in the Free Methodist church. 
Rev. O. D. Seward, pastor, and a lec- 
ture in a Mission, Rev. F. D. Geary, pas- 
tor. These meetings were well sustained, 
as was also a lecture given in the Bap- 
tist church at Macungie, near at hand. 
The Twelfth Street Baptist church is to 
be congratulated on its enlargement. 
During the pastorate of Rev. Fahl its 
seating capacity has been doubled. It 
will be remembered this was the meeting 
place of an Anti-secrecy State Conven- 
tion during the pastorate of Brother 
Moore, who, though very aged, still gets 
to the House of God and rejoices in her 
prosperity. Brother Fahl assured me of 
his sympathy and that I would be wel- 
come to the use of this church should I 
desire it for another Anti-secrecy Con- 
vention. At my second meeting in this 
church I was cheered by the presence of 
our former state Secretary, Rev. C. F. 
Kreider, who spoke in his characteristic 
way against the lodges. Cynosure lists 
were enlarged and I believe the Cause 
strengthened. 

During my ''home visit" I spoke in the 
Brethren church (not the Church of the 
Brethren), Washington, D. C. The pas- 
tor, Rev. Hubbard, gave me liberty to 
speak on the subject I thought best. Not 



having spoken to this people for many 
years regarding the lodge evil, I thought 
best to do so. The address was longer 
than usual, and this possibly accounted 
for the haste of some in leaving, but sev- 
eral remained to shake hands. 

During the two weeks spent in New 
York City and vicinity I lectured in the 
Second Reformed Presbyterian church, 
Rev. R. M. Sommerville, pastor, and in 
the training school of the Missionary Al- 
liance ; also gave brief talks before a 
Conference of Mission Lutheran Pas- 
tors, meeting in Pastor C. J. Renz's 
church, and I addressed a meeting of the 
Holland Christian Reformed Clasis, 
meeting in the first church of that body, 
Paterson, N. J. The new domine. Rev. 
E. J. Krohne, subscribed for the Cyno- 
sure without being urged, and expressed 
a desire for lectures when I could ar- 
range. I found all these pastors and 
domines as interested and helpful as ex- 
pected. 

Good preparation had been made by 
Domine F. Fortuin for the lecture at 
Whitinsville, Mass., last Wednesday, but 
the Lord sent an April shower of large 
proportions, diminishing the attendance. 
One man, who seemed much interested, 
said he walked a long ways, and would 
do so again should I let him know of a 
lecture which he might hear. The 
church at this place has been much en- 
larged and improved since my last visit. 
Surely these Christian Reformed friends 
have much to encourage, in pastor and 
place of worship. Rev. J. R. Thurston, 
who made the opening prayer at this 
meeting, has been for more than thirty 
years the honored pastor of the Congre- 
gational church at Whitinsville, Mass. 

It being prayer meeting evening, I 
"dropped in" to the first L^nited Pres- 
byterian church, Boston, and found the 
expected crowd of worshipers. The pas- 
tor. Rev. A. K. MacLennan, is chairman 
of the directors of the N. E. C. A. 
Though his people are of the laboring 
class, the money, the treasurer says, just 
comes "pouring in." They are paying 
oflF the church debt, adding $500 to their 
pastor's salary and giving largely to mis- 
sionary and other worthy causes. Your 
secretary was invited to speak; subject, 
"Choose tliis day whom ve will serve." 



24 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



Not all the lectures could be ar- 
ranged for in New York at this time, 
as I had planned. I return (D. V.) to 
speak in the Henry Street Norwegian 
Lutheran church, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Tuesday next. Rev. C. S. Everson, the 
beloved pastor of this flock, took in over 
one hundred new members prior to the 
Easter service. 

On the evening of May 4th I plan to 
speak in an Ohio Synod Lutheran 
church, Washington, D. C. Rev. J. E. 
A. Doermann, pastor. 

I hope to give lectures early in May 
on my way West. The General Secre- 
tary writes of work expected after the 
middle of May up to the Annual Meet- 
ing, June 2 and 3. Should friends in 
Chicago or vicinity wish me to lecture, 
write William L Phillips, 221 West Mad- 
ison street, Chicago, III, for date. 

The flowers are again lifting their 
faces of beauty toward the sun and shall 
we who have the Son of righteousness 
be less active? 

W. B. Stoddard. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOOD'S LETTER. 

Demott, Ark., April 10, 1909. 

I was over to Brinkley last month. I 
got the books you sent me the same day 
I left here for Brinkley, so I had a 
chance to show them to different ones 
on the train. Those books were eye- 
openers. 

I met a doctor on the train who lives 
in New York. He heard me talking to 
a lady about secret orders and said: 
''Ladies, that is a great subject you are 
talking on, but you should not expose 
the oaths. I have been a member of 
seven secret societies and I found them 
all rotten, not one thing true in them, 
and I quit them all. I saw men bow on 
thtir knees and swear to be true to 
each other, and to protect their brotri- 
ers' wives and daughters, but they don't 
mean what they say. The very worst 
men in them are generally the leaders. I 
went into the lodge at 15 years of age 
and I stayed in them until about four 
years ago. I am now 52 years old. I 
am thoroughly convinced now on the se- 
cret order question. They are all a hum- 
bug, with a few preachers to preach an- 



nual sermons to fool more people into 
them. I liked Masonry till I found out 
they were swearing to lies. They swear 
to be temperate, but they fill the lower 
floor of the temple with saloons. I don't 
want any more to do with them." 
I said, why is it, if it is wrong, that 

you have to keep the oath? He said, 
"Well, I want to be true to my word." 
I said. Doctor, you know what is right, 
but you are a coward, like Peter was 
when he was warming by the devil's fire. 
I said, throw off the devil's* yoke and 
take a stand for God. If I had made a 
league with the devil I would break it 
if I was killed the next minute. I said, 
don't the Masons protect murderers? He 
said, "Yes, they protect any kind of dev- 
ilment ; that is why I quit them. I would 
not stay in a thing that has all kinds of 
men in it and who help them out of their 
dirt." 

Well, I bid the doctor good-bye and 
went to Brinkley, where I met some 
Woodmen. There were three or four of 
these men together. They belonged to 
different lodges. I showed them the 
Rituals. They were astonished to see the 
thing in a woman's hand, but they owned 
that the Rituals were correct. 

I saw an article in one of our leading 
church papers, from which I clipped the 
following. It is written by one of the 
greatest leaders in this State : 

"The iilteDtion of the secret order chiefs 
is called to the importance of revising tlie 
rituals so as to eliminate the annual sermon 
business. Ignorant men and women should 
not be made to believe that tha lodge is a 
divine institution, and that they have the 
right to order the preaching of the gospel. 
;Let the lodge live as a lodge, and the church 
as a church." 

He says, take the annual sermon out 
of the church and let the lodge live. / 
say, take God's Word out of the Ritual, 
and let the lodge die, die, die. Yes, kill 
it dead. Yours for Christ, 

Lizzie Woods. 



Our young people's organization was 
born in 1888. It will not be of age for 
one year yet. How would a commemor- 
ative anniversary strike you? 



May, 1909. 



(JHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



'^o 



GREAT CREDIT DUE POSTAL DEPART- 
MENT. 

The names and addresses below are 
taken from envelopes delivered to us and 
intended for us. It is much to the credit 
of the postoffice department that it se- 
cures the delivery of so many strangely 
misdirected letters : 

D. D. Philip, 227 Madison St., Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Dealer in Expozas, Chicago, 111. About 
219 West Madison St. 



Cinasure Publishing Co., Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



Cenosure Office, Chiga, 111. 



Sunny Shore Office, Chicago, 111. 



Aiess. Sinashure Pub. Co., Chicago, 



111. 



The Synicure Pub. Co., 212 W. Madi- 
son St., Chicago, 111. 



The Christian Cynosure, 221 W. Madi- 
son St., Mihvaiikee, Wis. 



Christian Scynecure Pub. Co., Chica- 
go, 111. 



The Cinisure, Chicago, 111. 



The Editor of ''The Christian Cyno- 
sure," Chicago, 111. The South Lakes 
States, North American Republic. (For- 
eign.) 



Mr. W. I. Cynosure Christian, 221 W. 
ATadison St., Chicago, 111. 



Mr. C. C. Finney, Chicago, 111., 221 
W. Madison St. 



Anti-Secret Association, Chicago, 111. 



The American Christian Association, 
No. 22 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



Anti-Secret Societies Publ. House, 
Chicago, 111. 



The National Christian Pub. Co., 221 
W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



For the Pres., Anti-Lodge Society, 
Chicago, 111. 



Secret Society Exposing Publishing 
Co., Chicago. Madison St., near San- 
gamon, North Side of Madison. 



Booksellers' Pub. Co., Chicago, 111., 
221 Madison St. 



The Secret Society League, 229 Madi- 
son St., Chicago, 111. 



Christian Publishing Co., W. Madison 
St., Chicago, 111. 



Mr. J. O. Doesburgh, National Chris- 
tian Ass'n. Co., Chicago, 111. 



Publisher Anti-Secret Society Publi- 
cations, Chicago, 111. 

Christian Tract Association, Chicago, 
Ills. 



Union Christian Association, 221 
Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



Ezra Publishing Co., W. x^Iadison St., 
Chicago, 111. 



Ladies' National Christian Asso., Chi- 
cago, 111. 



International Christian Pub. Co., Chi- 
cago, 111., 222 W. JMadison St. 



The National Trust Assn., No. 221 
W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



The Blanchard Publishing Co., Chica- 
go, 111. 



National Chri.stian Temperance Union, 
Chicago, 111., 221 W. Madison St. 



Denominational Publishing House, 221 
W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 



111. 



The Lodge Lamp Pub. Co., .Chicago, 



International Christian Association, 
Cliicago, Illinois, 221 W. Madison St. 

Wm. W. Irving, 221 \V. Madison St., 
Chicago, 111 



26 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



S. Society Literature, 221 Madison 
St., Chicago, 111. 



Christian Book Concern, Chicago, 111., 
211 W. Madison St. 



The Fraternal Christian Association, 
221 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



Sttthm' te0tim0ttie0» 



EXPERIENCE IN MASONRY. 

I was told that Masonry was as good 
as the Church, and that only good peo- 
ple could join; therefore I made applica- 
tion for membership. My application 
was favorably received and I was sum- 
moned to the lodge-room, where I was 
initiated, passed and raised, all on the 
same night. The brothers in the lodge 
were so proud of me that they let me 
off easy, as compared with what I after- 
wards saw. 

Soon after joining the Masonic lodge 
I was converted to Christ. I began to 
search for the Bible origin of Masonry, 
and could not find it. There was Hiram 
Abiff : Masonry represented him to have 
been a Christian, but the Bible, so far 
as I could find, did not give any account 
of his religion. That weakened my good 
opinion of Masonry. About one year 
later I was called to the Christian min- 
istry, and began to travel. I found that 
in the State of Florida, where I was ini- 
tiated, there were Hve different bodies of 
Masons ; four of them were represented 
by a Grand Master, and one sort were 
strollers and had no head and could not 
tell their startling point. That made me 
weaker. 

In traveling I found that my lodge 
was not recognized as high as one of 
the others. I was advised to come out 
of mine and affiliate with the better 
lodge. First, it cost me $15 to join; 
then the dues and taxation per month 
were from 75 cents to $5 ; next there 
was $5 to be reinstated, and railroad 
fare $1.50; the D. D. G. M., who re- 
instated me for $5, gave me Amnesty 
and it cost $3 to put that in a lodge. Now 
here is where I woke up. The Wor- 
shipful Master, Secretary and Treasurer 



stood in, punched a hole in the bag and 
it leaked so bad we could not stop it. 
Eventually they could not stop it. My- 
self and friends — only two more — decid- 
ed not to put in any more. 

Look now, these men made us Ma- 
sons; instead of Free Masons they made 
us slave Masons. 

In thinking over my studies the Lord 
told me to take the money that I had 
saved for Masonic books and prepare 
myself for the ministry. I obeyed, and 
have been successful ever since. 

I found Masonry a system of organ- 
ized robbery and a humbug, its repre- 
sentatives thieves and liars. In that mo- 
ment when the Judge of all the earth 
shall come, they will be like the Ephraim- 
ites — they can't speak plainly. Then they 
will fall by the sword of a tyler who 
will not regard any on account of his 
greatness in any society. I feel that if 
I could only hear some of you brethren, 
it would strengthen me much. Rev. F. 
J. Davidson, ex-president of the Third 
District Baptist Association, of which I 
am corresponding secretary, when he was 
with us always stood for right. Pray for 
me. I am with you in heart, and hope to 
see some of you soon. May God bless 
and keep you. 

Yours for Christ and humanity, 

P. W. Baldwin, 
Adviser and Superintendent of Pine 

Grove Baptist Sunday School. 



A MASON ON MASONRY. 

A letter from Rev. A. J. Millard, Lit- 
tle Rock, Ark., contains the following 
from a brother minister to himself, which 
we give herewith : 

My Dear Sir — Your effusion upon 
Free Masonry is before me, and your 
judgment as to whether a Christian can 
be a Mason weighs but very little with 
me, for the reason that prejudice has 
blinded your mind so that you are in- 
capable of judging; and furthermore, 
you are not informed as to what Mason- 
ry is, at least your evidence would hard- 
ly pass in any court of equity. The past 
master (Ronayne), of whom you write, 
is a liar, and a falsifier. He has either 
violated a solemn oath which he took 
of his own free will and accord, or he 



May, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



27 



is ignorant, and speaks of things (like 
yourself) of which he knows nothing. 
It would be impossible for me to be- 
lieve a man, under oath, that would 
violate his obligation. And I have al- 
most as little use for the man who is 
going around with his smeller to the 
ground and meddling in other people's 
business. I have no desire to defend 
Free Masonry, for it needs no defense; 
it has lived amid the fires of criticism, 
the changes in nations, famines and 
pestilences. It is founded upon the 
Bible, which is its great light, and with- 
out which it could not exist. 

I shall at no distant date preach a ser- 
mon on *'The Creed of Free Masonry," 
and if you care to do so, you can come 
and hear what one has to say who knozvs. 
But don't worry yourself sick about 
those who are Masons, for if such men 
as Washington, McKinley and a host of 
others, who became Masons and re- 
mained such till their death, and never 
recanted, nor perjured themselves, but 
died in the faith, I shall consider myself 
in good company, whether considered a 
Christian or not, by narrow-minded 
cranks. I shall be satisfied to let the 
Master of us all judge and shall be glad 
to associate with such men as I have 
mentioned anywhere. 

Respectfully, 

G. W. Shepherd, 

.Pastor M. E. Church, 14th and Scott 
Street. 



LETTER FROM COLORADO. 

Editor Christian Cynosure : Thinking 
your readers may be interested in learn- 
ing some facts regarding the way the 
ministers are playing into the hands of 
the lodges, I will note a few. 

During the campaign last year the 
Anti-Saloon League of Colorado sent out 
many letters and printed matter to the 
ministers of the various churches 
throughout the State. Iliey mailed print- 
ed cards to be filled out and returned. 
Card number one simply committed me 
to do what any minister ought to do. I 
signed and returned it. About the same 
time I got a political paper containing a 
list of names for all good people to 
work for. 



This paper had the picture of one of 
the leading judges of the State and gave 
a number of reasons why he should be 
elected. Among the many good qualifica- 
tions was that he belonged to several 
lodges ; among the list was that he was 
"a. member of the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks." When Canon City voted 
under local option to close the saloons 
they were confronted by two clubs in 
the city, backed up by a corporation 
charter from the State, and found it im- 
possible to convict the members of these 
clubs for the sale of liquor, as they 
claimed to be incorporated under State 
law. One of these cliihs zvas the Elks. 
Canon City was forced to take legal 
steps to revoke their charter in order to 
stop their sale of intoxicating drink. 

It is sad indeed to think that the 
masses of the churches are so under the 
lodge domination that ministers will use 
their influence to elect leading lodge 
men of that class to office to enforce anti- 
saloon law. 

I believe our only hope, is for ministers 
of all denominations to stand firm on the 
lodge question. 

(Eld.) Geo. O. States. 



MASONIC MORALITY AND CHASTITY. 

[Editor's Note. We omit the names from 
the foliowiiig letter which we have received 
from the widow in (inestion. The point in 
the letter whir-h makes it of any public value 
is the fact that it illustrates the moral char- 
acter of the secret institutions to whicli this 
ex-minister belonged. Since he had been 
faitliful to his lodge vows, he died in the as- 
surance of a hope of happy immortality in 
the Grand Lodge above, and of being buried 
with lodge honors. This widow's statements 
are vouched for by our friend. Tlev. A. J. 
^filiard.] 

I am the widow of a Rev. 

an ]\r. E. preacher. We were 

living in Clark county, Arkansas. Eight 
years after our marriage (1905) he left 
me and fled with another man's wife, 
nuich younger than myself. This wom- 
an had a little girl less than four years 
old and a respectable man as her hus- 
band. They left this State, going to Ok- 
lahoma, and by some means, i^robably 
his Masonic relationship, he secured an 
appointment as minister at some place iii 
the Muskogee circuit, but the time came 



28 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



when his character had to be vouched 
for in order to continue to hold a place 
in the Oklahoma Conference. Hence the 
presiding elder of the Conference from 
which he came, Rev. C. M. Hollet, re- 
ceived a communication, asking him to 
vouch for and recommend the said Rev. 

. The answer was short and 

conclusive: "I cannot recommend and 
vouch for the man." 

Immediately after the receipt of said 
inquiry a telegraphic message was re- 
ceived by the presiding elder, asking, 

"What's the matter with Rev. ?" 

To which the presiding elder replied with 
only two words: "Women, whisky T 

His M. E. pastorate ceased, but not 
his Masonic standing, as he had not vio- 
lated the chastity of any female relatives 
of Masons as far as his knowledge wetu. 

I wrote to that woman and told her 
that I was the lawful and only living 

wife of Rev. , and that she was 

living with him in adultery. One child 
was born to them. He died about i8 
months ago, leaving the poor creature to 
shirk for herself as best she could with 
her child. He died at Gravette in his 
Masonic faith and was buried in an Odd 
Fellows' cemetery, with Masonic honors. 

"Alas! My brother!" ''Be sure your 
sin will find you out," has evidently been 
verified in this man's career. I have en- 
dured untold sufferings in soul and body 
during the time of his sinful life, but 
God has given me grace and strength in 
His blessed name to endure it, and main- 
tain myself and my son. 

After the death of my husband I wrote 
to that woman's husband, whom she had 
deserted, and asked if he would take her 
back and forgive her; to which he re- 
plied, No. He said that she had his 
property in her possession and had dis- 
posed of it, and left him in poor circum- 
stances, but that now he had a small 
store and was prospering, and he could 
not take her back. He thanked me for 
my request, but said, 'T cannot under any 
circumstances take her back." 



He who poses as a Christian and yet 
is living secretly in sin shall have great- 
ox condemnation than those who are 
•r.penly profligate and profane. 



SAMPLE CYNOSURES. 

We add a goodly number this month 
to the roll of those who have taken 
advantage of the opportunity to help the 
cause by circulating the Cynosure. The 
number, however, of volunteer work- 
ers in this line is still too few. Less than 
200 copies of the Cynosure have been 
sent out. 

We Have Several Thousand 

Cynosures, that are several months old, 
still on hand. The postage and clerical 
hire which it costs to send them out 
ought, at least, to be met by those of 
our readers who are interested in this 
work, but it is more important to get 
these magazines into the hands of men 
and women than to get the few cents 
which has been charged. This month we 
shall send packages of 25 not only to 
those who remit the 29 cents, but to any 
of our subscribers requesting them and 
promising to distribute them judiciously. 

Workers' Honor Roll. 

Rev. Henry A. Clausing, Jasper J. 
Tucker, J. B. Nelson, C. P. Jones, A. J. 
Failey, Mrs. Olive Kendricks, D. D. 
Zehr, J. Van Wyck, Rev. A. Gruhn, J. 
A. Bryant, J. S. Yaukey, Henry Siess, 
Albert Mygatt, D. M. Byerly, Mrs. Liz- 
zie S. White, Charles L. Saudrus, Isaac 
Hinshaw, B. F. Hester, Charles L. Todd, 

A. J. Loudenbach, P. Beck, J. S. Ellis. 
Thomas P. Hitchcock, A. M. Mannes, 
Rev. E. Geotz, Rev. C. C. Potter, J. H. 
Dickie, Rev. A. J. Millard, Rev. W. S. 
Bandy, Rev. F. Kittel, J. C. Young, Mrs. 
L. A. Randall, Mrs. Mary P. Smith, M. 
C. Torrence, Rev. A. M. Malcom, Reu- 
ben D. Small, M. D., Rev. T. M. Dalton, 
A. T. Towley, Mrs. N. E. K., Miss N. 
S. Coleman. 

Chas. Wallgren, M! J. Boyce, Albert 
Fiegel, William L. Martin, Mrs. M. M. 
Burnap, Rev. H. J. Reimann, A. L. 
Mershon, Rev. G. A. Pegram, Joseph 
Hoffhines, Rev. E. T. Coyner, Rev. Wil- 
liam Brueggemann, William Gay, John 
A. Cross, S. E. Roth, Mrs. • John S. 
Congdon, Dr. A. D. Pitcher, T. J. Det- 
amore, Mrs. Bessie Newell, Rev. J. G. 
Rugland, Mary J. Long, Mrs. Edith M. 
Kerr, O. H. Rippy, R. A. McCoy, Rev. 
Alex. Wagner. 



May, 1909. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 29 





"A voice that in the distance far away wakens t/jc slumbering ag38.'* 

"We hold : 4. That the charters of all Secret Lodges granted by our Federal ano 
State Legislatures should be withdrawn and their oaths prohibited by law." — Am- 
erican Party Platform. 

Thaddeus Stevens, a prominent Republican politician, held — "By Freemasonry, 
trial by jury is transformed into an engine of despotism and Masonic fraud." 

President Fillmore, J. C. Spencer and others: — "The Masonic fraternity tramples 
upon our rights, defeats the administration of justice, and bids defiance to every 
government which it cannot control." 

Jwfl^gre AfarfiAa//, Chief Justice of the United States, decided: — "The institution 
of Masonry ought to be abandoned as one capable of much evil and incapable of 
producing any good which might not be effected by safe and open means." - 

William Wirt, Attorney General of the United States, speaking of Freemasonry, 
affirmed: — "I view it as at war with the fundamental principles of the social com- 
pact, and a \vicked conspiracy against the laws of God and man, that ought to be 
put down." 

John Quincy Adams, President of the United States, declared: — "I am prepared 
to complete the demonstration before God and man, that the Masonic oaths, obli- 
gations and penalties cannot by any possibility be reconciled to the laws of moral- 
ity, of Christianity, or of the land." 

Charles Francis Adams: — "Every man who takes a Masonic oath forbids himself 
from divulging any criminal act, unless it might be murder or treason, that may 
be communicated to him under the seal of fraternal bond, even though such con 
cealment were to prove a burden upon his conscience and a violation of his bound- 
en duty to society and to his God." 

Charles Sumner, an eminent American statesman, in 1854, penned these words : 
^'I find two powers here in Washington in harmony, and both are antagonistical 
to our free institutions, and tend to centralization and anarch}' — Freemasonry and 
Slavery; and they must both be destroyed if our country is to be the home of the 
free as our ancestors designed it." 

ThurloLU Weed, the Warwick of American politics for inore than half a century., 
testified: — "I now look back through an interval of fifty-six years with a conscious 
sense of having been governed through the Anti-Masonic excitement by a sincere 
desire, first to vindicate the violated laws of my country, and next, to arrest the 
great power and dangerous influences of Secret Societies." 

William H, Seward, Secretary of the United States vmder President Lincoln said : 
^'Before I would place my hand between the hands of other men in a secret lodge, 
order, class, or council, and, bending on my knee before them, enter into combma- 
tion with them for any object, personal or political, good»or bad, I would pray to 
God that that hand and thatknee might be paralyzed, and that I might become an 
object of pity and even the mockery of my fellow-men." 

Wendell Phillips, America's most popular orator, wrote: — "I wish you success 
most heartily in your efforts to arouse the community to the danger of Secret So- 
cieties. They are a great evil; entirely out of place in a republic, and no patriot 
should join or uphold them. Considering the great forces which threaten tlie wel- 
tare of the nation in the next thirty years, and how readily and efficiently they can 
use any secret organizations, such should not be allowed to exist. ' 

President George Washington's Farewell Address: — "The very idea of the power 
and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every 
mdividual to obey the established government. All obstructions to the execution 
of the laws, all combinations and associations, under whatever plausible cliaracter, 
with the real design to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation 
and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fundamental prin- 
ciple, and of fatal tendency." 

Daniel Webster, Secretary of State in the cabinets of Harrison, Tyler, and Fill- 
more avowed: — "All secret associations, the members of which take upon them- 
♦^elves extraordinary obligations to one another, and are bound together by secret 
oaths, are naturally sources of jealousy and just alarm to others; are especially un- 
«avorable to harmony and mutual confidence among men living together under 



30 CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. May, 1909. 



popular institutions, and are -dangerous vo the general cause ofcjvil liberty and 
just government. Under the influence of this conviction it is my opinion that the 
future administration of all such oaths and the formation of all" such obligations 
should be prohibited by law." 

Such, reader, is the unimpeachable testimony of a host of men first and foremost 
in American politics and history. And now let a few popular newspapers be 
heard. 

Saint Louis Vanguard: — Masonry is a stupendous sham. The wonder is how 
such a despicable farce could find support. 

Syracuse (N. Y.) American Wesleyan: — Secret Societies are the natural hot-bed 
of "murder and treason not excepted." No matter how pious their pretensions, 
keep clear of the whole ly led and curtained clan. 

Nortfi American Review: — Incorporation is a privilege granted associations on 
the ground of public utility. It follows logically that it is an abuse and a fiction to 
incorporate a Secret Society of any kind. 

Rocliester (N. Y.) Earnest Christian: — Secret Societies. These are becoming so 
dangerous to civil institutions that some nations of Europe suppress them by law. 
In this country their influence is fast becoming all controlling in both Church and 
State. 

Washington Sword: — We congratulate the Anti-Secrecy Reform movement in 
its acquisition of a valuable and substantial edifice in this city, to be used as the 
"headquarters" of this branch of the work. Thus a "battery" is planted in the 
national capitol, which we trust will vigorously open and continue its fire upon the 
"enemy" until an unconditional surrender is forced upon them. 

United Presbyterian: — One of the great hindrances to right governmental deal- 
ing in Ireland grows out of the existence of Secret Societies. They are habitually 
plotting anarchy. It is so always in everyplace. Secret, hidden caballing among 
inen for any purpose is one of the worst kinds of villainy, and it is to this that se- 
cretism inevitably leads. 

Sandy Lake News: — Had Fagan not joined the secret band of murderers that 
took th e life of Burke and Cavendish, he would not have paid the penalty of com- 
plicity in the bloody crime of this clandestine and lawless combination with his 
life on the gallows. He sowed to the wind and reaped the whirlwind. He joined 
hands with a Secret Society and shared the doom and disgrace that attached to the 
murders they committed. 

Toledo fi/arf&.'^No man has a right to place himself where he has no moral con- 
trol of his own actions; yet this is what he does when he joins a Secret Society 
and binds himself to blindly obey all orders from headquarters without hesitation 
or thought of whether tliey are right or wrong. Indeed he dares not question the 
mandates of these persons who!Ti he does not know. He must simply do as he is 
bidden, even though it makes him a partner in the most atrocious crimes, when he 
has no intention of committing a moral wrong. The lesson these disclosures 
teach is to become a member of no society whose purposCvS are not openly declar- 
ed, to take no oaths to obey persons whose very names are unknown. 

New Yorfi Witness: — Secret Societies for treasonable purposes have received a 
death-blow in Ireland in two ways. First, it has been made quite clear that these 
secrets cannot be kept from the government. Second, The Pope has denounced 
Secret Societies with more emphasis than ever before, and required all bishops and 
priests to do the same. Third, Their grand mistake is made clear to all the poor 
dupes who take oaths to obey blindly, even to the extent of committing murder, 
leaders whom they do not know, only to be given up by those leaders to be hang- 
ed when the time of trial comes; and such dupes are likely to be scarce in the 
future. 

Chicago Daily Times: — Secret Societies are dangerous because young men and 
others who are not for the moment fully mindful of their public duties may be led 
by persuasion under the influence of the peculiar solemnity and impressiveness of 
an initiation, which unseats their judgment, to take oaths which are inconsisten^ 
with their duties towards the State and society, and which they may regret, iii 
moments of reflection, that they have taken. 

Hastings (Neb.) Weekly Gazette-Journal: — The day for cliques and rings has 

fone by. Open and frank methods in politics are the only kind that will win. 
air dealing and honest action will gc» Tarther than craft, cunning, and underhand- 
ed scheming. Democrats, republicans, and anti-monopolists will do well to learn 
that fact. Combinations and cabals are resorted to only by those who have not 
the public confidence necessary to successfully land them m official positions. 



Mnv, 1909. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 31 



Chicn.oo Tribune:-"' A rins^ is synonymous with theft. If partisan purpos'"* were 
1 or.est there would be no occasion for a ring. Any clique or organization in poli- 
tics of which the people are not memters, and of whose operations they are not 
cognizant is dangerous to the community, and doubly dangerous when it has the 
saloon interest and criminal classes at its back. 

Neuj Yorh Commercial Bulletin: — If there is a more arrogar. ^ and at the same 
time a more un-American "monopoly" than this, [Knights of Labor] we should 
like to discover it. In the first place its designation implies a title of nobility, and 
for these things we have no use in this country. Workingmen especially would 
do well to beware of them. They are monarchical and unrepubiican. Our revolu- 
tionary forefathers were jealous of all such imitations of royal technique and hence 
they inserted in the Constitution a clause prohibiting Congress from conferring 
upon anybody any order of nobility. It is, in addition to this, a Secret Societj', 
another circumstance which exposes it to suspicion. 

Emanuel Rebold, Past Deputy of the Masonic Grand Orient of France, says : — 
*'The Freemason receives not the law, he gives it." 

Masonic Corner Stone: — "This wonderful Fraternity has a glorious record. A 
Mason by making himself known to a brother, always receives aid in distress and 
danger." 

Thomas Smith Webb, (the Webb Work is used by more Mayonic lodges than 
any other) on the Masonic oath and covenant: — "No law of the land can affect it 
— no anathema of the church weaken it. It is irrevocable." 

Albert Pike, Most Puissant Sovereign Grand Commander of American Mason- 
ry : — "If a person appeals to us as a Mason in imminent peril, or such pressing 
need that we have not time to inquire into his worthiness, then, lest we might re- 
fuse to relieve and aid a worthy brother, we must not stop to inquire as to anv- 
thing." 

Rob. Morris, Masonic Sovereign Grand Inspector General : — "The system of 
Masonic law has little of the republican or democratic spirit abojit. it. . The first 
duty of the reader of this Synopsis is to obey the edicts of ins Grand Lodge. 
Right or wrong, his very existence as a Mason hangs upon obcv-lience to the pow- 
ers immediately set above him. Failure in this must infallibly bring down expul- 
sion^ which, as a Masonic death, ends all. The one unpardonable crime in a Mason 
is contumacy^ or disobedience.' 

A. T. C. Pierson, Grand Captain General of the Grand Encampment of the Ma- 
sons of the United States :-!^"We may not call in question the propriety of this or- 
ganization; ifwe would be 'M.SLSOn^VfQvnu^t yield private judgjnent. *To the law 
and to the testimony — if any man walk not by this rule it is because there is no 
light in him.' The principle of submission and obedience runs through the whole 
system and constitutes one of the greatest safeguards of our inst.lution. The Ma- 
son IS obedient to the Master, the Master and Lodge to the Grand Lodge, and this 
in its turn to the old landmarks and ancient regulations of the order. Thus is a 
due degree of subordination kept up, and the institution preserved in its primitive 
purity." 

Albert G. Mackey, Past General Grand High Priest of the General Grand Chapter 
of the United States: — "There is no charge more frequently made against Freema- 
sonry than that of its tendency to revolution and conspiracy, and to political or- 
ganizations which may affect the peace of society, or interfere with the rights of 
government. We are to give aid in imminent peril when Masoncally called upon, 
not lest injustice may be done ifwe pause to inquire into the quc'^tion of affiliation, 
but because the obligation to give this aid, which is reciprocal ai long all Masons 
never has been and never can be canceled. Treason and rebel'\on also, because 
they are altogether political offenses, cannot be inquired into by .1 lodge; ar.d al- 
though a Mason may be convicted of either of these acts in the ("imrts of his coun- 
try, he cannot be Masonically punished; and notwithstanding h'-» treason or rebel- 
lion his relation to the lodge, to use the language of the old Charges, remains in- 
defeasible." 

Missouri Masonic Grand Lodge Report: — "We are all eqvn.l citizens of one 
common g()\ernment, having equal rights, equal privuoges, and equal duties; and 
in which government, thank God, the majority does -Aot govern. For our order 
in its very constitution, strikes at the root of that whuh is the ' 'Ty basis of pop- 
ular government. It proclaims and practices, not tliat the wil- of the masses is 
wise and good, and as such 1 1 be obeved, — -not that the m.-ijo' ty sliall govern. 
Not only do 've know no North, no South, no East -.w-^ no WeM, but wc know no 
;^overnment oJive our own. To every governnicut ba\ c that of Ma;G:;rv. and to 



32 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1909. 



oacii and all alike we are foreigners. We are a nation of men only, bound to cacr 
other by Masonic ties as citizens of the world, and that world the world of Mason 
ry — brethren to each other all the world over, foreigners to all the world beside 
For ourselves, we deny as Masons that any civil government on earth has the 
right to divide or curtail Masonic jurisdiction when once established. It can only 
be done by competent Masonic authority, and in accordance with Masonic usage." 

Missouri MasoniG Grand Lodge Report for 1880: — "Greater dangers threaten 
Masonry to-day than ever before. We occasionally hear the alarm sounded by 
some faithful watchman upon the tower who descries with clearer vision the com- 
ing storm, and warns us to be prepared for its approach." 

These Masonic witnesses can not be gainsayed or even questioned. It is the 
positive and autlioritative language of the Grand Lodge, and of men who are now 
the learned rulers and Governors of Masonry and the highest members in the 
order. '" 

Benedict Arnold, first traitor to American liberty, learned his patriotism in Hi- 
ram Masonic Lodge, No. i. New Haven, Conn., and died a Freemason in good 
and regular standing. Aaron Burr, another traitor to the government, plotted his 
treason in Royal Arch cipher, and also died a Free and Accepted Mason in good 
and regular standing. Jefferson Davis, a Free and Accepted Freemason, led the 
great rebellion and the fact did not even taint his Masonic standing, but did have 
much to do in securing his pardon. Since the war it has been learned to a cer- 
tainty that the Ku-Klux Klans kept their masks in Southern Masonic lodge rooms. 
Ex-rebel General Albert Pike who volunteered to lead yelling Indians against 
his race and color, as well as the flag of his country, at the battle of Pea Ridge, 
Arkansas, where wounded ooys in blue were scalped and tomahawked by the score, 
is now the "Most Puissant Sovereign Grand Commander" of all the Masons in 
the United States — he is the highest Mason in America if not in the world. Wm. 
M. Tweed, the great rascal of New York City, and of Tammany notoriety, learned 
his honesty in Perfect Ashler Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, of which lodge 
he was a bright and shining light. The leading Star-routers were high members 
ofthe Masonic order, and hence their acquittal. But why enumerate.? In every 
county Freemasonry has turned its criminals loose on society. 



ON FREEMASONRY 



FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of ^Sity Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
Institution and a critical analysis of the chp.iacter 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cove^~, 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- 
trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
ferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business • of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
'yhlch are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
(fnracj of this work has been attested by high and 
tinimpeachfi.b1e Masonic authority. Cloth, $1.25; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 

OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master, Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages, in cloth, $1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 



A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc., 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen have 
been taken from the columns of the Christian Cyno- 
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strictly accurate, it is substantially true, and a» 
such is vouched for by Rev. S. A. Scarvie, of 
Decorah, Iowa (R. F. D. 6), a very excellent 
•"Christian gentleman, and a seceder for conscience 
jike from this order. 10 cents. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
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Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
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REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
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PRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
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A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
of Christian churches to disfellowship secret so- 
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SERMON ON SECRETISM. 

By Rev. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear pres- 
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and to Masonry especially, that are apparent ta 
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Was Washington 
a Mason? 

By PRES. CHARLES A. BLANCHARD 

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This is the best, as well as the most interesting-, contribution yet 
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ADDRESS 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
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I 



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TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

Rev. M. L. Haney, a minister and evangelist 
of the Methodist Episcopal church; and a seced- 
ing Mason, tells his experience and states his 
objections to the Lodge. A Christian Lodge Im- 
possible. Is the Lodge a Help or a Hindrance 
to Salvation ? 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. 
A packaffe of 25 for 25 cents. 

BAPTI? T TESTIMONIES. 

Pro 1 Rev. P. S. Henson, D. D., Rev. A. J. 
Gordon, D. D., Rev. Nathaniel Colver, D. D., and 
others. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A 
packag'e of 25 for 25 cents. 

ETHICS OF MARRIAGE AND HOME LIFE. 

Secret Societies in Relation to the Home. 
By Rev. A. C. Dixon, D. D., pastor of Cljicago 
Avenue (Moody) Church, Chicago. 3 pages ; post- 
paid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A packagre of 75 for 
25 cents. 

CHURCH AND LODGE. 

An Address Delivered at Mr. Moody's "Con- 
ference for Christian Workers," at Northfield, 
Mass., by President Charles A. Blanchard, D. D. 
15 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A pack- 
ag'e of 25 for 25 cents. 

PERSONAL WORK: HOW TO SAVE CHRIS- 
TIANS FROM LODGES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
of Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois. Post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy. 

LODGE RELIGION. 

The Fundamental Doctrine, the "Universal 
Fatherhood of God," Discussed and Refuted. 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A packagfe 
of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE WORSHIP OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
OFFERED TO SATAN. 

Address by President Blanchard at the An- 
nual Convention of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, May 15, 1902. 

The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
but Masonry. The Governing Force is Masonry. 
The Greatest Masons are Our Teachers. Is Free- 
masonry a Religion? Is the Masonic Religion Chris- 
tian? What Kind of Religion is It? Marks of 
Demon Worship. 0»ur Duty. 24 pages ; post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy, or $1.00 per hundred. 



ODDFELLOWSmP A RELIGIOUS INSTI- 
TUTION 

And Rival of the Christian Church. 8 pages ; 
postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a packag-e of 25 for 
25 cents. 

WHY I LEFT THE REBEKAH LODGE. 

By Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull. 6 pages ; post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy. A packagre of 25 for S5 
cents. 

CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

What is Oddf ellowship ? Ought Christians to 
Perform Acts of Beneficence and Charity as Odd- 
fellows? Rebekah Lodge. By Rev. H. H. Hin- 
man. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a pack- 
age of 25 for 25 cents. 

WHY DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWS? 

By Rev. J. Blanchard. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents; a packagre of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE "GOOD MAN " ARGUMENT. 

God's Word or the Ofher Man's Conscience — 
Which Should We Follow ? 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents. A packagre of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE STRANGE CASE OF MR. GOODMAN. 

"Why Are There So Many Good Men in 
Secret Societies?" The Question Answered. 13 
pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A packagre of 
25 for 25 cents. 

ARE INSURANCF LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

The Modern Woodmen of America an illustra- 
tion. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A 
packag'e of 75 for 25 cents. 

OUGHT CHRISTIANS TO HOLD MEMBER- 
SHIP IN MODERN WOODMEN OF 
AJVLERICA? 

Extracts from History and Official Ritual 
of the order, showing its relation to Christianity. 
4 pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

Should a Christian Participate in Them? 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

MASONIC OBLIGATIONS. 

Blue Lodge Oaths (Illinois Work) ; Masonic 
Penalties; Are Masonic Penalti,es Ever Enforced? 
Masonic Arrogance ; Masonic Despotism ; Grand 
Lodge Powers ; Disloyalty to Country ; Our Re- 
sponsibility as Christians; What Can Be Done? 
16 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package 
of 25 for 25 cents. 

FOES OF THE CHRISTIAN SABBATH. 

A word on the common desecration of the 
Sabbath. Secret societies prominent in its pro- 
fanation. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. 
A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

A package containing one of each 
of the above tracts will be sent, 
postpaid, for 25 cents. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 W. Madison Street, CHICAGO, ZLL. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE—Per year, in advance, $1.00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies,' ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient; we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second -c ass matter May 19, '•897, at the 
Post OflBce at Chicagx), Di., under Act of M irch 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Our Thirty-fifth Annual Meeting .33 

Are You Coming? 34 

The Work of Wreckers 34 

Commencement at Wheaton .35 

Grent Names a Valuable Asset 35 

Stephen Merritt 35 

A Testimony 35 

Chief Business of the Lodge 3G 

A Red Red-Man 36 

Prohibition — Is It Right? 36 

Church and Lodge Statistics 37 

An Evil-Intrenching By-Law 38 

President Blanchard's Letter 39 

Conscience and a Lodge Funeral 42 

Freemasonry an Anti-Christian System.. 43 

Helping the Children of Lot 45 

The Roman Church .46 

The Bible and the Lodge 47 

School fraternities Hard Hit .52 

High School "Frats" in Oregon 52 

Poorest Stanford Scholars 52 

Control of School Activities 53 

Boston School Board Petition 53 

No Class Honors 54 

Old Wesleyan 54 

K. O. K. A 55 

Playing Horse 56 

Grand Growl of Curly Bears 56 

Fraternal Congress in the Woods 57 

Eastern Secretary's Annual Report 58 

Friends in Ohio, Take Notice 59 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter 59 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard's Letter 60 

Seeking Christ in Three Secret Societies. 62 

A Preferred Alternative 63 

Indubitably a Pest 63 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
oflScer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
gravings. The oathSj obligations and lectures are 
quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flexible 
ClOtb, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Noblea 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Ceatenary M. E. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes : "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
shiping Freemasons in the Christiar; Church. 10 
cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THt 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By "Spectator," Alianta, Ga. 16 pages; 
5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigious 
system, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion' ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
interesting. 30 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workings of 
Freemasonry," by fcx-President Charles Q, Finney, 
of Oberiin College. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

Its relation to civil government and the Chris- 
tian religion. By President J. Blanchard. The 
an-Christian, anti-republican and despotic char- 
acter of Freemasonry is proved from the ^ghest 
Masonic authorities. 5 cents. 




iim^w<^ 



"Jesns answered him, — I spake openly te m world; and in secret have I said nothing," John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLII. 



CHICAGO, JUNE, 1909. 



NUMBER 2 



ANNUAL MEETING 

NATIONAL CHilISTLA.N ASSOCLA.TION, 
JUNE 3 AND 4, 1909. 
The annual business meeting* and con- 
ference of the National Christian Associa- 
tion will occur on Thursday and Friday, 
June 3 and 4, 1909, at 10 o'clock a. m., 
in the Belden avenue Baptist Church, 
Chicago, m., for the election of officers 
and the transaction of other important 
business. 

C. A. BLANCHABD, President. 

N. E. KELLOGG, Recording Secretary. 



OUR THIRTY=FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING 

What may I say that will awaken an 
interest in, and turn the footsteps of 
many Cynosure readers to our Annual 
Meeting, which will be held on Thursday 
and Friday, June 3 and 4, in the Belden 
Avenue Baptist Church, Chicago? 

Were I to say that the battle is over, 
the victory won, and that the forthcom- 
ing meeting is for stacking arms, and 
storing munitions of war, no one at all 
familiar with the facts would believe a 
word I had said. 

No, the meeting is a council for a 
continued and more aggressive warfare 
against the enemy. Doubtless many are 
disappointed that victory has not been 
sooner achieved. This comes from an 
underestimate of the strength and 
malignity of our Foe. Our older read- 
ers will easily recall the shock it gave 
our country when Mr. Lincoln first 
called for three-month volunteers to sup- 
press what was thought to be an un- 
fledged conspiracy. It required mints of 
money and a sea of blood to put down 
that rebellion, but the victory was worth 
all it cost. 

Sensible men do not enlist in war for 
the pleasure there is in it. 

For more than thirty years I have 
been familiar with the purposes and prac- 
tices of the National Christian Associa- 
tion. For twenty years I have been one 



of its Directors and for the past seven 
years I have been secretary of the board, 
and I have yet to find that it is either 
pleasant or popular to oppose oath-bound 
secret organizations. Were one to con* 
fer with flesh and blood he would avoid 
controversies with these fraternities. 

The surgeon does not lay his patient 
upon the operation table for the pleasure 
or the skill he may acquire in the use of 
the knife, but to save life. Truth, though 
unpopular, must be told. 

With the exception of a few of the 
more courageous churches, secret socie- 
ties have intimidated, paralyzed and 
stopped the mouths of Christians. 

Though pastors may have no sympathy 
with secrecy, yet it is only an occasional 
church that may be secured for the dis- 
cussion of secret fraternities. Not many 
years ago the same was true of the 
Hquor traflic ; it was unpopular to dis- 
cuss the question and few church doors 
were open for its consideration, but now 
the largest halls are too limited to ac- 
commodate the masses who clamor to 
hear the Rose-Dickey debates. 

The classic debates between Senator 
Douglas and INIr. Lincoln on the 
slavery issue in 1858 was the beginning 
of the end of that question. Organiza- 
tions that cannot endure the sunlight 
must sooner or later perish. When our 
foes dare to come out into the open and 
make a defense our association will make 
more rapid progress. 

Our time is coming. Let no one 
despair. The best annual meeting we 
have held in recent years was at the 
Aloody Church a year ago. 

For years the good seed of truth has 
been generously sown in that church and 
is now bearing fruit. Mr. Moody, its 
founder, always bore a powerful testi- 
mony against secrecy ; and so have all 
his successors down to the present in- 



34 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



cumbents, Dr. Dixon and Mr. E. Y. 
WooUey. ■ 

The Rev. Dr. Earl, pastor of the 
Church where our meeting is to be held, 
is a live-wire man, and in hearty sym- 
pathy with our work, and he and his 
people will give a warm reception to all 
who attend. Elsewhere will be found an 
outlined program of the meeting. The 
only thing this gathering may lack is the 
enthusiasm of numbers. Let us remedy 
this possible defect by our own attend- 
ance, and those who find it impossible to 
be present in person will in our behalf 
appeal to the source of all power. 

J. M. Hitchcock. 



ARE YOU COMING? 
Remember the Date, June 3rd and 4th. 

It is not too late to decide affirmative- 
ly! Are you questioning vs^hether it will 
be worth while? Listen to what one 
wrote to the Secretary after getting 
home from the last Annual Meeting. She 
felt just as you do before she decided. 

"Oh, brother Phillips, what a feast of 
good things we had at the Convention ! 
To me it was like rain on a parched soil. 
Not like souls coming to Christ, but the 
refrain was Victory !' Victory V or over- 
coming through Christ. Surely the Lord 
was present — there was such liberty — ev- 
ery minute seemed occupied. And then 
President Blanchard seemed to know 
when to help it along with some re- 
marks or hymn. What a hard worker 
for the Cause. You and Brother Blanch- 
ard seem so fitted for your work; and 
there was dear Brother Hitchcock, who 
seemed so alert and anxious for the suc- 
cess of the Convention. Surejy the Lord 
has at the helm of this grana organiza- 
tion just the men. Well, I feel thrilled 
with joy that the dear Lord opened the 
way for me to attend. It will be a happy 
recollection the rest of my days." 



This is a time for public gatherings. 
Many of the churches are holding their 
largest meetings. Synods, conferences 
and conventions are the order of the 
day. The NATioivrAL Christian Asso- 
ciation is as usual alive to the impor- 
tance of an annual meeting. The im- 
portance of the large home gathering 
will at once be recognized. You can 



not attend all the helpful meetings, of 
course. Should you not weigh the im- 
portance of each and patronize those 
where your presence will count for the 
most ? 

What more important gathering can 
there be at this time than that of Chris- 
tians to withstand the enemy of all right- 
eousness ? Can you be as loyal to God 
as you should, and fail to stand with 
those working in opposition to the 
greatest manifestation of false worship 
in the world to-day? Let us arouse and 
once again "come to the help of the 
Lord against the mighty." 

W. B. STODDARD. 



THE WORK OF WRECKERS. 

A brilliant Methodist pastor of this 
city recently advised young men of his 
congregation to join the Masons. A let- 
ter just received from a Methodist lady 
of Michigan advises us of a similar work 
for the Lodge by a Presiding Elder in 
that State. The heading of this article 
fittingly describes them. The following 
illustration used in a sermon by Charles 
G. P'inney, at the time President of Ober- 
lin College, is worthy of consideration. 
He speaks of wreckers who kindle false 
lights to lure vessels to destruction: 

''A ship is coming in after nightfall. 
The night is dark and stormy. The sea 
runs high. The ship labors. The 
tempest howls through the rigging. The 
great waves smite her. The master 
paces the quarter-deck, anxious and 
watchful. Oh ! if he could see the har- 
bor-light to guide him in the safe chan- 
nel. He hails the 'lookout' in the mam- 
top : 'Hallo, aloft!' 'Ay, ay, sir.' 'Do 
you see the light?' 'No light.' And 
again keen eyes peer through the dark- 
ness. The vessel rushes blindly on her 
course. Ah ! is that the combing of the 
breaker? 'Hallo, aloft! do you see the 
light? 'No-0-0!' The storm increases.. 
The vessel gToans and strains in every 
timber. The sea rages. And now the 
shout comes down: 'On deck, there.' 'I 
see the hght!' 'Where away?' 'Two 
points off the lee how.' ' 'Steady, quar- 
termaster; keep her full!' And on she 
plows her way, cheered by the guiding 
light. Ah! what is this? She is in* the 
midst of breakers ! And now she strikes 



June, 1009. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



35 



on the reef, and the masts 'go by the 
board/ and the wreckers come tumbhng 
in over her bulwarks, and their knives 
are red, and their hands filled with- plun- 
der. Their false light has cast away the 
ship. 

"So a treacherous Christian says to the 
souls of his fellow-men : 'Follow me, 1 
am going into port. I will guide you 
safely.' And following, they come upon 
the rocks' of perdition — and he is a mur- 
derer of souls." 



COMMENCEMENT AT WHEATON. 

The forty-ninth anniversary of the 
founding of Wheaton College will be 
celebrated on June i6. In the morning 
at lo o'clock there will be brief ora- 
tions from the graduating class, some 
seventeen in number, and in the after- 
noon the campus dinner, to which all 
friends of the College, old and new, are 
invited. After dinner there will be aa- 
dresses by the Hon. F. G. Blair, Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction, and oth- 
ers. All friends and old students are 
urged t_ -'-^^ -or this meeting and to be 
present so far as possible. 

The other exercises of Commencement 
week will be duly announced. 



GREAT NAMES A VALUABLE ASSET. 

The names of great men are prized by 
lodge promoters, and with reason. A 
man may be made a member of some of 
the lodge insurance orders while walk- 
ing on the street or by simply signing 
his name ; and in Masonry if the game is 
thought worth while, the candidate is 
spared the humiliation of an initiation 
and "made at sight." The Oklahoma 
Eagle speaks right out in meeting and 
gives the reason : "To attract the atten- 
tion of that class of the world's people 
whom the Eagles have been endeavoring 
to reach." 



"President Roosevelt, by coming 
among the Eagles, has benefitted the or- 
der in many ivays. His presence in the 
Aerie room has declared to tlie world 
that the principles upon which the order 
is founded are pure as the air we breathe, 
and this cannot fail to attract the atten- 
tion of that class of the tvorld's people 



whom the Eagles have been endeavoring 
to reach. By this action the President of 
these United States has said to the world 
that the Fraternal Order of Eagles is 
worthy the confidence and esteem of all 
good people, and the journey from this 
on to the mountain top of universal es- 
teem is going to be an easy one." — Okla- 
homa Eagle. 



STEPHEN MERRITT. 

One of the pleasures and privileges of 
the Agent is the meeting with Chris- 
tians, who have grown old, but not 
weary in divine service. 

In his accustomed place at his desk 
at the head of the "Stephen Merritt 
Burial Company" in New York, the 
writer found our aged Brother Merritt, 
who, in response to the call of God, 
came out from among the workers of 
unrighteousness, notwithstanding he had 
been favored by his former ^lasonic 
companions, not only in giving him the 
highest ofiice at their command, but also 
in adding a diamond medal as indicating 
their special appreciation. 

Though growing blind and unable to 
read, he had the recent Cynosures care- 
fully laid by in his desk for reading, as 
he said, "when he should get his sight." 
Though Stephen ^Merritt has sufifered 
much for his opposition to the lodge, his 
Undertaking Establishment was never 
more popular. There were seven fu- 
nerals on the day prior to my call. 

iVt the meeting of the New England 
Board, who should we meet but our old 
friend. Mother A. A. Rockwood, now in 
her 91st year. No small interest would 
bring her to such a meeting. ]\fy fa- 
ther had no truer friend than this dear 
old Saint, now soon to meet him in the 
glory world. W. B. Stoddard. 



A TESTIMONY. 

A stenographer listening to Rev. E. B. 
Stewart, a L'nited Presbyterian pasror 
of Chicago and a member of the Board 
of Directors of the National Christian 
Association, reports as follows : 

'T had a little encounter once in the 
city of San I^Yancisco, when I was pas- 
tor there. A\'e came into conflict with 
a certain prominent official over the Sab- 



36 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



bath Day question. He wrote me a very 
discourteous letter, as I viewed it, and 
as most people did, telling me that the 
end of all religion was charity. I wrote 
back and told him that I never saw that 
in the Bible, but that I had read in the 
Bible that pure religion and undefiled 
had certain qualifications tihat were very 
conspicuous ; one was to visit the father- 
less and the other was to keep oneself 
unspotted from the world; that I found 
that in my Bible. He has never found 
time to reply. I do not know what the 
earthquake did to him, or what became 
of him, but he never found time to re- 
ply. 

" 'Keep himself unspotted from the 
world.' I often think of that .when 
these claims about charity are being 
made — charity, so much by the month, 
or year, as it may be. It would be a 
good thing to remind some of these 
people — these lodge leaders — that the 
Master 'has said that the other thing to 
that end is, *'to keep himself unspotted 
from the world." If I mistake not, to do 
this will condemn the whole lot of lodge 
boosters and put them into confusion, 
and rout them as it did this conspicuous 
man 'in the city by the sea, who, by 
the way, was a great lodge man, and 
you may have suspicioned that because 
of the way in which he had defined char- 
ity." 



CHIEF BUSINESS OF THE LODGE. 

" 'To get the cash back that has been 
spent on these great buildings which ex- 
ist for the distribution of poisoned beer 
and alcohol,' said Howard, 'hundreds, 
aye, thousands of men and women, must 
drink till they die! Otherwise there 
would be no "profits" ; and the brewing 
and distilling companies would not be 
able to feed, like carrion crows, on the 
bodies slain !' " 

" 'And what do you think of small 
country places where the magistrates, so 
far as the granting of licenses goes, are 
mere slavish tools in the hands of one 
brewer?' asked Everton: 'I could name 
you a town where there are public 
houses in every street, and each one of 
those public houses is "tied" to the same 
brewery. Every penny is made by the 
one "Trust" concern, * >sc ^. g^ 



"Trust" in the workingman's ruin! 
Should any publican seek to trade with 
a different company, the magistrates 
''cannot see their way" to renew his li- 
cense. There is a Freemason's lodge in 
the town — but the chief business of its 
"freemasonry" is to support the one ras- 
cally brewer on the gains made by the 
drunkenness of the people, and in allow- 
ing no outside competition.' " — From 
''Holy Orders,'' by Marie Correlli. 



A RED RED=MAN. 

The lodge of an Eastern tribe of nom- 
inal Red Men ought to be hung with 
crimson draperies or decorated with ver- 
milion. About the end of April this 
tribe was preparing to entertain some 
great chiefs of the order, when an Indi- 
an in full native costume joined the pa- 
rade, and, continuing in the march, as- 
tonished the white warriors by entering 
the hall with them. They allowed him to 
stay, nevertheless, when they discovered 
that he had the password and could 
prove that, although a red man, he was 
a Red Man. They found him the fea- 
ture of the evening, overshadowing the 
official visitors ; and for once the Red 
Men had a medicine man, for he be- 
longed with a traveling medicine combi- 
nation that happened to be in town. 



PROHIBITION— IS IT RIGHT? 

The great debate between President 
Samuel Dickie, of Albion College, 
Mich., and Mayor David. S. Rose, of 
Milwaukee, has been published by the 
Phalanx Printing Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Authorized edition — proofs revised by 
speakers themselves. Contains portraits 
of the debaters, estimates of the debate 
from three viewpoints — wet, dry, and 
independent. Also letters from Milwau- 
kee Brewing Companies referred to in 
President Dickie's address. Neat 
pamphlet, with cover. Single copies, 5 
cents. Twenty-five copies, $1.00. 



No penitent sinner condones his evil 
deeds by saying he is not as bad as oth- 
ers. 



The graces, like the tender plants, 
need careful culture or they will not 
grow and flourish. 



June, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



37 



€0ntnbutt0tt0. 



The love of Christ is a magnet which 
draws the soul of the saint to the Sa- 
vior and thrills His heart with joy. 



CHURCH AND LODGE STATISTICS. 

Rev. H. L. F. Gillespie, a Universalist 
minister, sends us from Manchester, la., 
statistics which he has compiled, show- 
ing the relation of lodge membership to 
the population of the United States in 
various years, beginning with 1775 and 
extending to 1907. These are made still 
further comparative by the addition of 
Church statistics for the same years. 
Perfect accuracy cannot be claimed, but 
Mr. Gillespie believes that he has se- 
cured a close approximation. Each year 
taken for this purpose may be regarded 
as providing an index for its periods. 
The first one is 1775, and it stands for 
the period of later colonial times. The 
next, 1800, stands for the period of 
change. The next, 1850, represents the 
interval between the time of the na- 
tional anti-Masonic political party, which 
arose soon after the murder of William 
Morgan, a little later than the first quar- 
ter of the last century and the Civil 
War, which began a little after the mid- 
dle of the century. The period of what 
might be called the lodge craze is repre- 
sented by the two remaining dates, 1900 
and 1907, the second one bringing the 
report closer to the present time. 

1775. 

Population, 2,640,000. 

Church members, 200,000. 

Lodgemen, less than 1,000. 

Ministers, 1,432. 

Universalist ministers, 3. 

One church member to 13.2 inhab- 
itants. 

One lodgeman to 2,640 inhabitants. 

One minister to 184.35 inhabitants. 

One Universalist minister to 880,000 
inhabitants. 

One lodgeman to 200 church members. 
1800. 

Population, 5.305'925- 
Church members, 364,872. 
Lodgemen, 3,000. 
Ministers, 2,651. 



Universalist ministers, 15. 
Ratios. 

One church member to 14.54 inhab- 
itants. 

One lodgeman to 1,768.64 inhabitants. 

One minister to 2,001.4 inhabitants. 

One Universalist minister to 353,728 
inhabitants. 

One lodgeman to 12 1.6 church mem- 
bers. 

1850. 

Population, 23,191,876. 

Church members, 3,529,988. 

Lodgemen, 70,000. 

Ministers, 25,655. 

Universalist ministers, 724. 

Unitarian ministers, 284. 
Ratios. 

One church member to 6.4 inhabitants. 

One Lodgeman to 331 inhabitants. 

One minister to 903.9 inhabitants. 

One Universalist or Unitarian minis- 
ter to 24,447 inhabitants. 

One lodgeman to 50.4 church mem- 
bers. 

1900. 

Population, 76,295,220. 
Church members, 27,422,025. 
Lodgemen, 10,000,000. 
Ministers, 154,228. 

Universalist ministers, 735 ; church 
members, 48,426. 

Unitarian ministers, 550. 

Ratios. 

One church member to 2.4 inhabitants. 
One lodgeman to "j.6 inhabitants. 
One minister to 595 inhabitants. 
One Universalist or L^nitarian minister 
to 59,373 inhabitants. 

One lodgeman to 2.J church members. 

1907. 

Population, 84,000,000. 
Church members, 32,283,658. 
Lodgemen, 10,567,672. 
]\Iinisters, 139,503. 

Universalist ministers, 720 ; church 
members, 55,831. 

LTnitarian ministers, 544. 

Ratios. 

One church member to 2.() inhab- 
itants. 

One lodgeman to 7.9 inhabitants. 

One minister to 602 inhabitants. 

One L^niversalist or Unitarian minis- 
ter to 66,455 inhabitants. 



38 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



The published bill, introduced m the 
House of Representatives at Washing- 
ton by Mr. Gaines of Tennessee, but 
which was buried in the Committee of 
Post Offices and Post Roads in the 6oth 
Congress, is of interest only because it 
shows how uneasy lodge men are get- 
ting over the wide distribution of their 
rituals as it is being carried on by the 
National Christian Association. 



AN EVIL INTRENCHING BY LAW. 

BY REV. WILLIAM H. CLAY. 

On page i8 of the May number of the 
Christian Cynosure is printed in full a 
bill introduced by Mr. Gaines of Ten- 
nessee, in the House of Representatives, 
Washington, D. C, for the purpose of 
suppressing all privileges through the 
mails of giving ligiht on the inner works 
of secret societies iby those who are op- 
posed to them. This is in keeping with 
the law passed last year by the Ten- 
nessee Legislature, authorizing the seiz- 
ure and confiscation of any exposure of 
any secret society', if found in the pos- 
session of any other than members of 
the secret society exposed. The attempt 
now is to push the cowardly spirit of the 
Tennessee measure into the statutes of 
the nation. Is there not manifest a fear 
by the cable-itowed, hoad- winked crowd 
that, with the whisky curse down, the 
American people will rise up against the 
domineering, enslaving attempts of the 
Secret Empire? 

This effort 'by Mr. Gaines, or others 
by him, is, in effect, a confession that 
the works and barbarous oaths of the 
orders have been brought to the surface, 
to the gaze of the public. Where, now, 
is all their braggadocia denying that the 
orders have been truthfully exposed? 
Who is competent to swear that a sup- 
posed offender has an actual exposition 
in his possession? The competent per- 
son making the affidavit were then an 
offender. The publication of the fact 
would prove a further offense. How 
would witnesses dare to tell the "truth, 
the whole truth and nothing but the 
truth" without violating their lodge 
oaths and confirming the expositions? If 
only the untruthful exposition is to be 
iupn^essed, who among the lodge 



devotees would dare make the discrim- 
ination in a. court? 

The attempt to enact such a law as 
proposed is an attempted stultification of 
law and morals. Is not the constitution of 
the United States in its first amendment,, 
which guarantees the freedom of all re- 
ligious bodies, to be respected? Or 
would the spirit of lodgery trample the 
constitution in order to suppress those 
religious bodies that follow their Master 
who ever spake openly to the world and 
who proclaimed that 'Tn secret have I 
said nothing?" These bodies opijose r:ie 
cowardly "works of darkness," and men 
of enlightened consciences assert their 
right of truthful speech by pen as Amer- 
icans and Christians. Statements made 
against secret orders, if false, are already 
provided for by law. Libelous state- 
ments are now subject to prosecution. 
But the bill in question seeks to place 
truthful affirmations adverse to these 
ground moles of society upon a plane of 
the indecent literature prohibited in the 
mails. This is an insult to men and wom- 
en of the highest morals and religious 
principles known to the 'world. . 

Anti-secret religious ibodies are in 
accord with Daniel Webster, who be- 
lieved the secret orders aangerous My 
civil liberty. The present 'bill under con- 
sideration is a demonstration of the 
truthfulness of Webster's observation, 
and a justification of his further judg- 
ment that they should be prohibited toy 
law. If secret orders are undersappers 
of a free government, as the attempted 
passage of this bill would lead candid 
thinkers to believe, then they, and not 
those favorable to open methods of 
speech and procedures in all organiza- 
tions protected by law, should be sup- 
pressed. Were the spirit of the bill to 
succeed in entrenching behind law, the 
former African slavery on American soil 
were as a passing eclipse to a deep mid- 
night. 

What does this plot against anti-se- 
crecy further demonstrate? Clearlv that 
the cause of the secret orders is so mal- 
odorous and reprehensible that its issues 
will not bear the liglit of public discus- 
sion. What reputation would a church 
deserve that would appear squalling be- 



June, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



39 



fore Congress 'because some one had ex- 
posed its rites of receiving members or 
its other ceremonies? What can be said 
favoraible to a general poHtical society 
that is afraid to have its issues pubHshed, 
or that 'Would petition Congress to for- 
bid the use of the mails to those who 
would expose its doings? Know-nothing- 
ism should 'be considered out of date. The 
present advanced age declares in favor 
of more publicity for the sake of purifi- 
cation and protection. But the spirit of 
the Gaines bill would force the country 
to revert to worse than the days of Boss 
Tweedism. The secret orders are but 
a graft, a leech, upon human society, 
and would protect the most dangerous 
graft from just investigation. Night 
riders and their ilk should be exposed. 

The bill is a reversal of human prog- 
ress and a confession of the Secret Em- 
pire's criminal character. It fears a con- 
firmation of its heinous murders from 
the days of William Morgan, as corrob- 
orated by the 'brutal oaths of secret or- 
ders, and fears its deserved ignoble repu- 
tation in its killings and maimings when 
its confirmatory ceremonies are seen by 
the public. The Secret Empire is an ex- 
otic upon American soil. The voice of 
an enlightened public should encourage 
puiblicity and discourage that which bears 
the brand of a criminal. 

This bill may accomplish undesigned 
ends in exposing fhe unchristian char- 
acter of the lodge system, and in pushing 
the agitation and investigation into cir- 
cles greatly out-numbering those of the 
churches and the few of the incorporat- 
ed national society opposed to secret or- 
ders. Christianity, the noble cause that 
it is, challenges public investigation. 
'Trove all things; hold fast that which 
is good," is inscribed upon its colors of 
defiance, while secret orders seek to hide 
themselves like criminals from a full and 
critical investigation of their swollen pre- 
tensions, and to their assumptions 
pledge their votaries with bands of pro- 
foundest secrecy, like Jesse James cut- 
throats, and by the present bill would 
skulk under the skirts of Congress whim- 
pering for protection from the exposure 
of their meannesses by the noble who 
bring their procedures to light. 

Let the agitation move forward, and 



show up these orders to be, as they are, 
adept schoolmasters to train wicked op- 
erations for the Mafia and Black Hand 
societies in arts of framing mischief un- 
derhandedly by law, resorting to the arti- 
fices of cowardice in attempts to over- 
ride the national constitution and to de- 
stroy the rights of others — as evidenced 
by this bill. 

Huntington, Indiana. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

Fathers and Brethren : 

I am just in from a meeting in which 
a happy Christian man several times 
spoke of the days in which he was a 
drunkard, a gambler, a criminal and also 
a 'member of a number of lodges in good 
and regular standing. He was not mak- 
ing an address on the subject of secret 
societies, but was simply giving a Gospel 
address. He was not quoting from oth- 
ers, but was giving his own experience 
and warning young men to avoid the 
pitfalls into which he had fallen. 

Why do not our preachers who are 
lodge' men do the same? Why do they 
go on from day to day silently or open- 
ly supporting the orders which are sap- 
ping the foundations of the very 
churches which give them bread? Are 
they blind to the real character of the 
orders? Do they really believe that it 
is right for men to spend their time and 
money and soul-lives in these secret 
dens? Do they really approve of the 
dances — vain, expensive, lascivious — 
which are part and parcel of the lodge 
life? Do they consider the oaths to a 
partial charity, a partial honesty and a 
partial purity — such oaths as a Mason 
swears — fit for a Christian man to take? 
Do they in their hearts think it right for 
a man to take upon his soul the bloody 
penalties which Free Masonry imposes? 

To suppose that they do approve of 
all these vile and evil things would be 
to discredit their profession of Christian 
faith. It is simply impossible that it 



40 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



should be true. But if not, why do they 
not do as the speaker to whom I have 
just been hstening did? Why do they 
not say to the young men of their con- 
gregation that they ought to avoid the 
sohcitations of the lodge as they would 
those of the hariot or the saloon? Is it 
fear or ignorance or greed or what? 
President Finney said that as soon as 
he was converted his moral nature 
loathed the lodge. Colonel Clark said: 
''The lodges are binding men in bundles 
to be iburned." He was at one time a 
Knights Templar Mason. Rev. William 
S. Jacoby was, hefore he was converted, 
a member of a number of lodges. He 
burned up his Knights Templar uniform 
in the stove, and buried his sword in his 
back yard. Why do not all the lodge 
preachers of our day do the same way 
with their lodge accouterments ? 

Only a Divine Courage Will Do. 

It is the nature of us all to hate to be 
singular; to desire to go with the crowd. 
Then, too, there are almost certain to be 
losses of money and friends, if one comes 
out iboldly against lodges or anything 
else which is popular. It has never been 
easy to face the world and tell it plainly 
of its sins. More preachers would have 
been beheaded if more had said to their 
Herods : ''It is not lawful for thee to 
have her." I read recently a beautifvil 
sermon on aggressive Christianity. It 
was fine in phrasing and no one could 
object to a single doctrine laid down, but 
it had this serious defect ; it did not name 
a single evil on which Christians were to 
wage war. They were exhorted and en- 
couraged to be aggressive, but in no case 
were they told in what direction to march 
or who to fight. This is very easy, it 
never yet made a martyr nor is there rea- 
son to suppose that it ever will. 

Ought we not to pray for these broth- 
ers who are entangled in secret orders 
that they may clearly see the nature of 



the thing into which they have been led 
and may have boldness to break from it 
without delay? I have known of some 
cases where men dropped out of lodges 
because they did not wish to pay their 
dues. In other instances men leave be- 
cause of personal quarrels, tout I never 
knew one man to leave these orders in 
a bold, rnanly fashion unless he came out 
for Christ's sake, moved by tlie Holy 
Spirit. 

The remark just made respecting 
prayer needs emphasis ; let us linger 
upon it. We do not pray for one an- 
other as we should. There is no doubt 
on this point. We criticise one another, 
and at times we scold one another, 
but we do not pray much for one an- 
other. Can we not get about it? Sup- 
pose you make a list of all the secret 
order ministers you know and, without 
talking to men about them, begin talk- 
ing with God for them. What would 
result? All who know the power of 
prayer to accomplish wonders are sure 
that eyes would he opened and tongues 
loosened to speak forth the praises of 
Jesus, who came that men might know 
the truth and be by it made free. I 
do not expect ever to write or say a 
more important word than this. Breth- 
ren, let us begin in earnest to pray for 
our brothers who are in the lodges. 
A White Carnation in the Buttonhole. 

You will remember that I have on sev- 
eral occasions. called attention to the fact 
that the orders are now seeking in ev- 
ery possible way to unite themselves to 
the lives of decent men in order to stave 
off the coming judgment. One after an- 
other they are having their memorial 
days in which they get some preacher to 
give them a sermon in glorification of 
secrecy, after which they go out to the 
burial ground and put flowers on the 
graves of their departed brethren. One 
after another they are getting up enter- 



June, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



41 



tainments of a helpful character to draw 
in the decent men, who simply will not 
5tand the horse play initiations and the 
low stories. Now they are followmg tlic 
suggestion of a worthy man that we 
should have a "mothers' day" on which 
€very man should wear a white flower in 
memory of his mother. You may say: 
"'Well, why not? Is it not a good thing 
for them to do ? Why mention it in the 
way of criticism?" 

The answer is very easy, there is no 
harm in the church-going, or the lec- 
tures, or the white flower in the button 
hole. The harm is in the use which is 
made of them. These are devices to give 
standing to the lodge. They are means 
of securing favor from men who would 
loathe the whole secret order business. 
And when the ignorant outsider has been 
deceived into the order by some decent, 
helpful thing like a white flower in a 
button hole, what then ? Then comes the 
degrading initiation, the outrageous 
oaths, the bloody penalties, the immoral 
dances, the Sabbath-breaking excursions, 
the evil associates, the ruined homes. 
The white flower to be worn on a moth- 
er's day, for mother, came we believe 
from Mr. George T. Angel, who spent 
his life and a fortune in organizing hu- 
mane societies among children, the very 
persons that the lodges shut out. 

But, says some honest man w'ho has 
been caught in the lodge trap: "What 
would you have us do? We must do 
something." We reply : We would have 
you abandon your secret oaths, your 
murderous initiations, your blasphemous 
handling of the word of God, your ex- 
clusion of women and children, of the 
poor and needy. We would have, you 
spend your money on your homes, your 
wives and children, and on the church 
which has given you a Christian land in 
which to live. We would have vou 



promise never again to be found in a 
place where your Saviour is not named. 

But our friend replies : "That would 
be abolishing our lodge." Not neces- 
sarily. It would cut out the suspicious, 
dangerous, evil elements of it. You 
could, however, keep the organization of 
neighbors and friends. You could make 
all your meetings open to men and wom- 
en and children. You could make them 
open to rich and poor. You could make 
them so sweet and clean that you would 
be proud and glad to have all the good 
people in the town present to look on. 
I submit it to every honest lodge man 
who reads these words : Would not that 
be in every way a better thing than you 
have now? It is my firm conviction 
that there are tens of thousands of se- 
cret society men in our country who 
would hail such a change with joy as a 
release from an outrageous and an in- 
tolerable bondage. 

If this be true, why should not all 
such persons leave the lodge unless those 
who manage it will consent to such 
changes? "Who would be free himself 
must strike the blow," and this is a good 
time in which to do it. The principle 
of secrecy is hopelessly discredited be- 
fore the world. It never had a real rea- 
son for its existence. It has been the 
ruin of tens of thousands of fine young 
fellows, who have come to it loyal and 
true to home and church. The mother 
of all the lodges was iborn in a liquor 
shop and has always been yoked up with 
drink until the progress of the temper- 
ance cause made it unprofitable. 

Tens of thousands of broken-hearted 
wives would wipe the tears from their 
faces if the lodges could be thus changed 
to-day. Hundreds of thousands of chil- 
dren would dance for gladness because 
the father was to stay with them instead 
of going downtown after dinner. Tens 



42 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



of thousands of man traps would wait 
in vain for their expected victims. Tens 
of thousands of well-meaning, but 
weakened and tempted men, would find 
the chains fall off of their hands the 
day the lodge should 'be made an open 
society for open-hearted men. 

What's a Minister For? 

Is he not by his very profession bound 
to such a work as this? Who is to lead 
the way to the Golden Age if he, by rea- 
son of fear or self-interest, holds back? 
I appeal to my lodge brethren in the 
name of Jesus Christ, who is ignored 
and insulted by the orders. I appeal to 
them in the name of fhe neglected wives, 
and children, who weep alone at home 
while husbands and fathers spend their 
time and money with their boon com- 
panions far away. I appeal to them in 
the name of their prayer meetings and 
church services forsaken by men; left to 
women and children. I appeal to them 
in the name of their ordination vows in 
which they swore to forsake the woric! 
and to be loyal soldiers of our Lord 
Jesus Christ so long as life should last. 
It cannot (be, brothers, that you will con- 
tinue to walk in unequal fellowship with 
the godless and evil men who are, as you 
well know, in all the secret orders of 
our day. 

Many thousands of men, weary of the 
senseless ritual of the orders,, are ready 
to follow honest leaders to liberty. If 
you quit your lodges they will come to 
your churches. Why should they now 
come, while you yourselves discredit the 
house of God and virtually proclaim to 
the world that the lodge is needful, that 
the church is insufficient? Brothers, the 
Lord of the harvest is calling, the souls 
of men are dying and before you are 
aware the end that hastens on will be 
here. In Christian love. 

Fraternally yours, 
Charles A. Blanchard. 



CONSCIENCE AND A LODGE FUNERAL 

Rev. Harvey E. Simons in 1907 
preached to his congregation in Ashland, 
Ohio, from the texts: John 3:20-21 and 
II. Cor. 6:14-18. His subject was, ''Se- 
cret Societies and the Church." Messrs. 
Saner and Straub, publishers, Ashland, 
Ohio, have issued the same in pamphlet 
form and will send it postpaid for 5c 
per copy. 

Our readers will be interested to learn 
what it was that drove him to instruct 
his people. 

He says : ''Many of you will be sur- 
prised that your pastor should devote an 
evening to the discussion of secret so- 
cieties, for you cannot be ignorant of his 
attitude on other great matters ; that 
while he has always used the whole of 
his influence on the side of temperance 
and of every other phase of civic right- 
eousness, yet he has always insisted that 
his call from God and from you as a 
congregation is a call to preach the Gos- 
pel of the Son of God, and he persisted 
in carrying out that call even at the ex- 
pense of having some say he was afraid 
to speak his convictions. 

"I would have you once for all un- 
derstand that the theme for the evening 
is not of your pastor's choosing. Under 
ordinary circumstances it would have 
been the farthest from his thought, and 
■even since it has been forced upon him 
it is the farthest from his liking. 

"Without going into detail, the cir- 
cumstances that called for this address 
are as follows : Your pastor, in compli- 
ance with his best judgment, and with 
the clear approval of his conscience, re- 
fused to participate in certain lodge fu- 
nerals in this community.'* 

In closing his able sermon, it is inter- 
esting to note how naively he expresses 
the explanation why so many ministers 
are as brave as lions on temperance and 
as dumb as oysters on the Lodge. 

"Let me call your attention to one 
thing : Your pastor might have preached 
against the saloon until his hair had be- 
come silvered with age, and his preach- 
ing would not have caused one iota of 
the commotion that has been caused in 
our town by the fact that he ventured 
not only to assert his right as an Amer- 
ican citizen, but has had the supreme 



June, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



43 



audacity to be true to his convictions, 
when these convictions happened to in- 
terfere with the request of certain se- 
cret societies. Is it because secretism 
has become so accustomed to be obeyed 
both by laymen and ministers that it 
has grown shameless in its effrontery? 
Or is it possible that the ruler of the 
darkness of this world has become accus- 
tomed to have his tail trampled upon — 
his slimy tail of lust and intemperance — 
until it has become benumbed and he 
does not mind so much, and that now he 
bestirs himself with so much energy be- 
cause a minister of the gospel, in stand- 
ing true to his convictions, has touched 
the apple of his eye? 

"I do not know. I simply pray God 
that He may lead me into the paths of 
righteousness for His name's sake,' and 
that He may give me the strength and 
courage to follow His leading. God 
helping me, I shall be true to the convic- 
tions which He bas given me until that 
time when He shall see fit to call me 
hence. 

''And you; what will you do? It has 
been hinted that you may get rid of your 
pastor. I do not for one moment believe 
it, for you would be ashamed to ever 
again look a self-respecting, conscien- 
tious man in the face. But even so, I 
should still thank my God that He has 
saved me from becoming yOur hireling 
when you called me to become your pas- 
tor, your under-shepherd." 

FREEMASONRY AN ANTI=CHRISTIAN 
SYSTEM. 

[The following are the notes of a sermon 
preached by Rev. J. R. Millin, pastor of the 
United Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, on February 28th, 1009, and furnished 
at our personal request. These notes aro 
suggestive and have the right ring. May 
their influence be widely extended.— Editor.] 

The text: "Preach the Word." 2 
Tim. 4:1, 2. With such authority the 
Christian preacher must not offer apol- 
ogy for bringing to Book everything that 
comes down the world's pike. All hu- 
man affairs must reckon with the Book 
— churches, political parties, business 
concerns, amusements, societies and 
what not. 

Freemasonry ni the limelight of the 



Book. Look at it. "The lodge is old" — 
so is sin. "The lodge does some good" — 
so did Robin Hood, the outlaw. "The 
lodge has good men in it" — follow the 
argument and you will approve polygamy, 
slavery, wine drinking, etc. But "to the 
law and the testimony." Is. 8 :20. To 
the Book ! Specific counts against Free- 
masonry, some of which apply to lodges 
generally. 

Freemasonry is contrary to the spirit 
of Christianity. Christianity calls for 
light, openness, sunshine. Gen. i 13 ; John 
18:20; Matt. 5:14-16; John 3:19. Hear 
the pubHc cry for righteousness to-day 
— it is "Publicity, publicity, publicity!" 

But 'hear another voice whispering — 
"Secrecy, secrecy, secrecy !" What 
voice is that? It is the voice of creatures 
of the skies, of men who are entering 
secret lodges (upper floors with doors 
barred) and who class themselves with 
owls and bats and bugs. 

Freemasonry fosters the clannish 
spirit. This is one of the incidental evils 
of denominations. But lodgery is clan- 
nish in essence, in principle. It does 
it "on purpose." And the lines drawn are 
not according to the Book. See Gal. 
6:10. 

Lodge man, how readest thou : "Es- 
pecially to my lodge brethren," with the 
lame and the halt and the blind, the 
needv, shut out? Another voice cries. 
(Matt. 11:28), "Come unto Me, all!" Is 
not that better? 

The lodge system violates the Book on 
fellowships. Fellowship — is it a cheap 
thing with you ? The Christian's fellow- 
ship is "with the Father and with His 
Son, Jesus Christ." The Book accord- 
ingly is careful to guard our fellowships. 
See 2 Cor. 6:14-18. But see that lodge 
parade. Who are "yoked" as "brethren?" 
Jews and Christians and unbelievers — 
brethren. And Satan smiles in triumph. 
"Wherefore come out from among them 
and be ye separate." 

Freemasonry, et. al., impose obliga- 
tions at the time unknown. The candi- 
date for initiation "goes it blind." But 
see — Jer. 4 :2. AMiat a fuss there would 
be if churches should propose to receive 
meml)ers on such a plan ! \\'hat else 
than a lodge would dare to outrage the 
intellectual and spiritual freedom of men 



44 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



by imposing unknown obligations? The 
lodge makes impossible people. Learn 
wisdom from the case of Jephtha 
(Judges 11:30-40), of Herod (Matt. 
14:1-12 )of Solomon (i Kings 2:19-25). 
The name Freemasonry is a lie. Free- 
masons are not masons. Nor are they 
free. 'The truth shall make you free." 
John 8:32. 

Freemasonry is a religion without 
Christ. It has an altar, a ritual, etc., but 
no Mediator. W'hy no Mediator? Be- 
cause Freemasonry includes Jews and 
unbelievers and Mohammedans as well 
as Christians. Christians must consent 
and do consent to have Christ as Media- 
tor excluded from lodge "worship." 

Now read John i :28 ; John 14 :6 ; Acts 
4:12; Acts 16:31; Is. 53:4-6. Moses 
was too wise and too loyal and too 
strong to be caught in such a snare of 
Satan (Ex. 8:25-27). But many Chris- 
tians are not. 

Cain and Abel worship together. Jew 
and Christian worship together. Shy- 
lock to Antonio (in the Merchant) -^'T 
will neither eat with you nor pray with 
you." But to the amazement of Shylock 
some Christians will be so accommodat- 
ing to the Jew as to allow their Saviour's 
name to be cut out of the lodge ''pray- 
ers." Many, doubtless, depending upon 
lodge religion instead of going to the 
Grand Lodge above, go straight to the 
Grand Lodge below. Their blood be 
upon the Christians in the lodges, which 
exclude the name of Christ from their 
rituals ! 

Now note God's institutions for man- 
kind — the Home, the State, the Church. 
What's the matter with these? What is 
lacking ? The lodge hurts these every 
one. The Home — the lodge divides the 
family with secrets, it wastes time and 
money. The State — the lodge some- 
times controls courts and politics and 
wars. The Church — lodge hurts it in 
time, money, attendance and spirituality 
and in the salvation of those "that are 
without." 

Satan cares nothing for Masonic tem- 
ples, Jewish temples. New Thought tem- 
ples. Christian Science temples and all 
the rest — ^there is no Cross in them. 
"God and His Son except naught values 
he." 



t^itoriaL 



The Annual Meeting should be held 
as per By-Law, on the second Wednes- 
day of May, but it is provided that for 
good and sufficient reason the Board of 
Directors may change the date and des- 
ignate the place. 

The board have fixed upon Thursday 
and Friday, June 3 and 4, and for. the 
place the Belden Avenue Baptist Church. 

The church is situated on the corner 
of Belden avenue and Halsted street, on 
the North Side of the city, opposite the 
McCormick Theological Seminary, and 
may be reached by the Clark street, Lin- 
coln avenue, Halsted street and other 
street car lines. 

The morning session of Thursday, 
June 3, will begin at 10 o'clock. There 
will be devotional services followed by 
business, reading of minutes, annual re- 
ports of officers, appointment of commit- 
tees, etc. The morning session of Fri- 
day will have, in addition to the finish- 
ing up of business, a consideration of the 
general topic: "The Secret Society 
Peril and How to Meet It." 

President Blanchard will preside and 
call the convention to order Thursday 
afternoon at 2 o'clock. It will be a time 
of special interest, for short addresses 
are promised from a number of well- 
known speakers. We are hoping to^ have 
with us at that session Rev. H. H. 
George, D. D., of Pittsburg, Bishop 
Wright of Dayton, Ohio; Rev. J. T. Lo- 
gan, editor of the Free Methodist; Rev. 
W. B. Stoddard of Washington, D. C. : 
Rev. E. B. Stewart of the U. P. Church; 
Rev. Dr. Earl of the Baptist Church, 
Elder J. M. Moore of the Brethren 
Church, Rev. B. E. Bergesen of the Lu- 
theran Church and others. 

The Friday afternoon session will be 
given up to the testimony of Seceders. 
We have the promise of those who have 
been Masons, Odd Fellows, Eagles, A. 
P. A.'s and in other lodges, and who 
have come out of them for. Christ's sake, 
to be present and give their testimony 
for the good of their fellow man. 

Thursday evening will be one of spe- 
cial interest to teachers, parents and oth- 



June, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



45 



ers. The subject that has been so promi- 
nent in all parts of our country during 
the past few years, viz : Fraternities in 
High Schools, is to be considered by the 
dean of the Michigan University, Prof. 
John O. Reed, from the standpoint of 
the Efifect of Fraternities in Colleges 
and Universities. His address will be 
followed by one by President C. A. 
Blanchard of Wheaton College. 

The Friday evening session, we ex- 
pect, will be the climax in interest of all 
that has gone before. Rev. William Dall- 
mann of Milwaukee, Wis., president of 
the English Lutheran Synod, has the 
reputation of being a very able speaker. 
He will give the first address, which will 
be followed by one by Rev. G. A. Pe- 
gram, late State Agent of the Michigan 
Christian Association. 

The Moody Church Band will furnish 
music at the opening of each evening 
session. 



HELPING THE CHILDREN OF LOT. 

n our view of Freemasonry is right, 
and if the Christian initiates of the or- 
der who have condemned it from their 
hearts have not been wrong, an appropri- 
ate Scripture for devotional use in Anti- 
masonic meetings is the Eighty-third 
Psalm. The eighth verse says : ''They 
have helped the children of Lot," Read 
more literally from the Flebrew this 
would be : "They have been an arm to 
the children of Lot," or "They have be- 
come an arm to the sons of Lot." One 
does not like to think of his brother in 
the ministry of the gospel as within the 
circle where such a charge would apply. 
When a Christian editor brings the text 
naturally to mind, he again shrinks from 
fully applying it. Yet a journal pub- 
lished in Tremont Temple, the Boston 
headquarters of its denomination, seems 
in recent years to admit to its columns 
matter adapted to be helpful to certain 
secret orders which appear hostile to 
Christ. This is the more striking when 
we remember that Dr. Nathaniel Colver, 
an early pastor of Tremont Temple 
church, was for a while in great agony 
of mind in consequence of being affili- 
ated with flagrant masonic iniquity — 
particularly the prevalent one of lying 
about the exposures in denial of their 



truthfulness. Writing to another who 
had been a Royal Arch Mason, Dr. Col- 
ver said in part: *T supposed the obli- 
gation of Masonry binding upon me. It 
was at the time when all the secrets of 
Masonry were published. Masons were 
everywhere denying the disclosures and 
persecuting seceders with a spirit of 
malignity unsurpassed at any time by 
the slaveholding rebels of the South. I 
suffered very much at the time in my 
spiritual felings; I felt that, though si- 
lent, I was indorsing deception and ly- 
ing; and yet my oaths bound me from 
frankness and truth. I did not suffer 
more when under conviction for sin 
than I did in that terrible state. 

'Tn the providence of God, I read one 
morning for our family worship con- 
cerning the forty Jews who bound them- 
selves under an oath not to eat until 
they had killed Paul. It struck me and 
unfettered my thoughts. I soon arrived 
at the conviction that they were bound, 
not to keep, but to repent, of their oaths ; 
that any oaths that contravened the law 
of God, were matters for repentance and 
abandonment. From that time I have 
neither honored, obeyed, nor spared that 
lying imposture of Free and Accepted 
Masons. I got free from the snare 
with repentance and brokenness of heart 
— but, oh! I thank God I am out "^ * 
''' I regard it as Satan's masterpiece." 

Not inconsistently with this, a con- 
tributor to the paper published where 
Dr. Colver was pastor, lately said: 
"When the church was the social center 
of the community, and social interests 
were few, it had, and without effort 
held, the attention of the people. To- 
day, the gospel gets no hearing with 
many, simply because of competing de- 
mands upon their time. Multitudes ig- 
nore the church without being unfriend- 
ly to it, only because they are preoccu- 
pied. Business, amusements, clubs, so- 
cieties, books, newspapers, and a thou- 
sand and one other objects of thought 
and action crowd religion out of life." 
This list includes Societies, which are 
accredited with making large contribu- 
tions to those conditions which this 
writer deplores. 

Nevertheless, the same issue of this 
paper published news of sermons 



46 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



preached to bodies of secret-society men, 
on the anniversary of an order in whose 
meetings all mention of Christ, or of 
anything distinctively Christian, is ex- 
pressly reprehended. Such reports seem 
adapted to augment the practice of in- 
viting and honoring as religious Deisti- 
cal lodges. Such a practice, in turn, is 
adapted to confirm lodge members in 
their superstitious confidence in cramped 
lodge ethics and twisted lodge theology 
as a sufficient religion. In fact, many of 
them probably think that the church or 
minister not only indorses them, but 
feels honored by their annual visit. Yet 
it is part of the doctrine of the order 
just then reported, that Christianity is 
''a sect," along with Mohammedanism, 
Buddhism, or any form of the religion 
which is included in the order as true re- 
ligion. If there is self-contradiction in 
honoring such superstition in a Chris- 
tion church, the fault is shared by the 
paper which reports the matter as legiti- 
mate and respectable religious news. 

The publication of occurrences like 
these may tend to increase and widen 
their prevalence ; it may in some degree 
compromise the church even where the 
whole inner truth of the case is not fully 
known ; and it is probably meant to be a 
utilization of the church for the two 
purposes of borrowing a cloak of re- 
spectability with ecclesiastical indorse- 
ment as its material, and of gaining 
new dupes. By inviting such organiza- 
tions, the church or pastor helps them 
steal the livery of the court of Heaven ; 
by reporting their coming, the paper co- 
operates in the mischief done to the 
souls of men. It sems to be making it- 
self responsible. 



"THE ROMAN CHURCH," 

"Protestants have often been accused 
of misrepresenting the spirit of the Ro- 
man Catholic church. It is sufficient, how- 
ever, to rest the question squarely on 
the following form of oath devised by 
Pius X., to be taken by all cardinals who 
participate in the election of his succes- 
sor. We simply call attention to the fact 
that the chief points emphasized are 
slavish obedience to the constitution es- 
tablished by the present pope, and a se- 



crecy which ought to be unnecessary in 
a Christian council, and which we be- 
lieve to be contrary to the spirit of 
Christianity. The following is the oath 
telegraphed from Rome to the Baltimore 
Sun: 

'' 'We, the cardinal bishops, the priests 
and deacons of the holy Roman church, 
promise, resolve and swear to observe 
inviolably and to the letter everything 
contained in the constitution of the Su- 
preme Pontiff Piux X on vacancy. We 
also promise, resolve, and swear, that 
whoever of us may be by the disposition 
of Providence raised to be Roman pon- 
tiff, will never cease to proclaim, defend 
integrally and strenuously also, the tem- 
poral rights, especially concerning the 
civil principality of the Roman pontiff 
and the liberty of the holy see; and that 
he shall again make this promise and 
oath after his elevation to the lofty of- 
fice of supreme pontiff. 

" 'But we especially promise and 
sv^ear that we shall most acurately, and 
with regard to all, including attendants 
or conclavists, observe secrecy in every- 
thing relating in any way whatsoever to 
the election of the Roman pontiff, and 
in those things which are done in the 
conclave or place of election; and that 
we shall never in any way violate this 
secrecy, either during the conclave itself, 
or even after the election of the new 
pontiff, unless special faculty or express 
dispensation be given us by the future 
pontiff himself; and also we shall never 
in any way accept, under any pretext, 
from any civil power whatever the office 
of proposing a veto or exclusive, even 
under the form of a mere desire; and 
that we shall not make known such veto, 
however it may have become known to 
us, either to the entire college of cardi- 
nals, taken as a body, or to individual 
fathers or cardinals, in writing or oral- 
ly, directly and proximately, or indirect- 
ly and through others, either before or 
during the conclave; and that we shall 
never lend favor to any intervention or 
intercession or any other method what- 
ever by which the lay powers of any 
grade or order whatsoever may wish to 
interfere in the" election of the pontiff.' " 
From The Watchman (Boston), April 
8, 1909. 



June, 1909. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 47 

THE BIBLE AND TH E LODGE. 

What Use Does the Lodge Make of the Bible, and How Is the Teaching of 
the Lodge Related to That of God's Word? 

It is not easy to say new things about a subject which has been so 
thoroughly discussed as has the secret society system. It is probably never 
wise to desire to say new things. There is great truth in the old saying: 
''What is true is not new, and what is new is not true." But there are 
always old truths which need iteration and reiteration. So long as men 
arc not living according to the law of God there is room and need for the 
prophet. All our discussions of the Lodge are based on the Word of 
God. It is with that we stand or fall. We have, however, thought it wise 
to gather up a few facts as to the relations of the Bible and the Lodge, 
and present them together, in order that all those who love the Holy Word 
may more intensely than ever hate the great enemy of that Word in our 
own time. What we shall say will fall naturally under two heads, viz. : 
First, What use does the Lodge make of the Bible? and, Second, How is 
the leaching of the Lodge related to that of God's Word? Respecting the 
question first suggested, I may be brief; of the second the treatment must 
be more detailed. 

The .Alasonic Lodge calls the Bible ''furniture." When we know that 
men mean well, it is foolish to be overparticular about the words which 
they use. If it appears that the order in question is right in its attitude 
toward this Book, and is honestly endeavoring to get men to conform 
their lives to its teachings, we would have no right to criticise them for 
an unhappy word. But if it appears that the unhappy word accurately 
represents the spirit and teaching of the organization, then the word itself 
becomes more important. 

The Bible Is Called "Furniture." 

What is furniture? Furniture is composed of various articles which 
are used in a house for the comfort and convenience of its occupants. The 
word does not in any way suggest life or power or rightful authority. The 
Bible, then, is "furniture." It is to be used, so far as this word indicates 
its character, to minister to the ease and comfort of the members of the 
order. But the teaching goes on : "The Holy Bible is given to us as the 
rule and guide of our faith ; the Square to square our actions ; and the 
Compasses to circumscribe our desires and passions in due bounds with all 
mankind, especially with brother Masons." We are getting on. The 
Bible is the rule and guide of faith, and the square and compass are the 
rule and guide of action. The Bible teaches us what to believe and the 
carpenter's tools teach us what to do. And all three are "furniture." 
What now will be the effect of such teaching on the mind of the average 
member of a lodge? Will it not be to lead him to despise the Word of 
God? To us this seems inevitable. We believe it to be so. And further, 
we believe this to be one of the reasons for the present prevailing disre- 
gard for this Book which is the only hope of the world. 

As with the Bible, So with Its Teachings. 

The great lesson which men need to learn, according to the Bible, is 



48 CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. June, 1909. 

to trust the Word of God. Men do not believe it, and that makes the 
trouble. They do not believe its promises or its threatenings. If they 
believed either one it would in many instances be quite sufficient to make 
them worthy men. As it is, they harden themselves in sin or live on in 
a sullen despair, instead of being holy, happy men, as God intended them 
to be. 

It is safe to say that large part of our time is spent in trying to do 
for ourselves what God has promised to do for us, thereby hindering us 
from doing the things which God wishes and requires us to do for Him. 
No one can read the Bible without receiving the impression that if a man 
obeys God, God will take care of him. If we believe this and act upon 
it, it makes life a very simple matter. We are to do what God tells us 
to do, and He is to protect and provide for us. And when I say ''us," I 
mean not merely the individuals who trust, but them and their families. 
Some men say, 'T could trust for myself, but there are my wife and chil- 
dren." This is a clear intimation that trust in God is a kind of second- 
best reliance. We can take it for a time or for a part of our need, but 
when we want something really reliable we must go to men for it. 
"Join the Lodge and It Will Take Care of You." 

This is, in some form, constantly repeated in our ears. Only this 
week, a man who seems to be a delightful Christian, said to us that no 
man could make him believe that it was wrong to provide for his family. 
"Of course it is your duty to provide for your family," we replied, "but 
it makes a difference how you do it. If, for example, we should go to 
your house and steal, in order to provide for our family, would that be 
right?" "No, of course not," he replied. "Quite right; but is it any 
better to provide for your family by being yoked with godless and wicked 
men than it would be to provide for them by stealing?" This seemed to 
be a new thought to him, yet it lies upon the surface of the discussion. 

The whole world is looking on to see if the church really believes that 
God is to be trusted to do what He has promised to do. And we are all 
witnesses in this case. Day by day we are saying that God is, or is not, 
trustworthy. We declare that He can, or cannot, be relied upon to fulfill 
His word. If we join secret orders to protect ourselves or our families, 
we are understood by the world to doubt either the ability or the disposi- 
tion of God to care for us, and when we furnish this testimony we sepa- 
rate men from Jesus Christ. 

Witnesses Are Always Wanted. 

Ought not every man who knows that God keeps His word, to be glad 
to offer himself as a witness to that effect? If only men would do so, the 
unbelief of the world would be overwhelmed ; for there never was in all 
the world one who kept his word so royally and completely as does our 
heavenly Father. Only a few weeks ago we were in need of money to pay 
bills at the store. For it we prayed, and shortly a friend, upon whom we 
had no claim, who knew absolutely nothing of our circumstances, sent us 
a sum of money sufficient for our uses. Last week we needed nearly a 
thousand dollars to pay bills soon to be due. We asked God to supply our 



June, 1909. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 49 



wants, and in two days He sent us over eight hundred dollars. Remem- 
ber, too, that this was in a hard time, when many merchants were sending 
out bills for collection and receiving nothing when their messengers re- 
turned. We are not alone in this experience. Thousands of the Lord's 
people are having these proofs of His willingness to care for them. Yet 
men join lodges in order to secure help for themselves or their families. 
And all the orders with which we are acquainted, are urging them to do 
this very thing — to unite with orders to get from them what God has 
promised to give to His loving and obedient children. 

As to Humility and Meekness. 

There is no Bible teaching more plain than that concerning this virtue. 
God is said to resist the proud and to give grace to the humble. He pro- 
nounces blessings upon the poor in spirit. He says that the meek shall 
inherit the earth. Now what is the position of the secret orders respecting 
this grace which the Bible teaches to be so essential to Christian life and 
character? The lectures, the regaha, the titles, the whole spirit and ten- 
dency of the order, are to foster and encourage the life which God forbids, 
and to prevent the life which He requires. These lodges are not consist- 
ent with a men's republic, to say nothing of the kingdom of God. How 
must it sound in God's ears to hear poor, frail, sinful men calling them- 
selves and one another. Worshipful, Grand, Supreme, Puissant, Priest, 
King, Sovereign, Sublime, etc., etc.? Of course there is a ridiculous side 
to these high-sounding titles, with the regalia and what not that goes with 
them ; but at this time I ask you to think of the relation which these parts 
of the secret society movement sustain to the Scripture teaching we are 
considering. 

Is it possible for men to be meek and lowly in heart while carrying 
out the Rituals of these orders ? I am free to declare that it is not possible 
if lodgemen are like other men. The whole tendency of the organizations 
is to foster vanity and pride. ''Sir Knights," ''Right Worshipful," "Sover- 
eign Grand," "Noble Grand," — how is any man who is giving and receiv- 
ing such titles as these to gain or retain the simplicity of Christ? The 
thing cannot be done unless these- people are entirely different from the 

rest of mankind. 

As to Love of Humanity. 

This is another point on which the Lodge and the Bible differ radi- 
cally. The Bible teaches us to love men because they are men — children 
by creation of our Father in heaven. It declares that if we do not love 
men whom we have seen, it is a mere hypocrisy to pretend to love God 
whom we have not seen. And to this requirement it makes absolutely no 
exceptions. It says that for us to love only our friends and those who can 
and will love and bless us in return, is no proof of Christian character. It 
says that selfish, godless men do as much as that. It requires us to love 
our enemies, to bless those who curse us, and to invite to our homes those 
who can make us no return. 

Is this the spirit of the lodges? All men know that it is not. How 
can the ministers of the blessed gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ tolerate 



50 CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. June, 1909. 



these orders with their miserable, narrow, inhuman platform? They shut 
out half the human race at a single stroke, to begin with. Then they pro- 
ceed to exclude all the poor and unfortunate-, oi, the remainder, and then 
insult reason and common honesty by calling such a selfish, narrow, abomi- 
nable thing, charitable ! It does not require a Christian to hate a system 
like that. All that is needed is that a man have a bit of honor and a sense 
of the ridiculous. 

"Man is dear to man. The poorest poor 
Long for some moments in a weary life 
When they can feel and know 
That they themselves have been the fathers 
And the dealers out of some small mercies, 
Have been kind to such as needed kindness, 
For the single cause that we have, 
All of us, a human heart." 

This is the spirit which God has implanted in the soul of man ; but 
it is not spirit of the Lodge. That institution makes its boast that its 
members can get from one another what nobody else can obtain. 

As to the Taking of Oaths. 

It is not needful to dwell long upon this theme, yet it is well to re- 
member, and to help others to remember, the teaching of the Bible regard- 
ing oaths. It is so powerful and uncompromising that many good men 
have rejected even civil and religious oaths. But what a carnival of swear- 
ing when one enters the portals of a lodge! And is it not wonderful 
that Christian men who have sworn these oaths, with their obligations to 
a- partial morality and their bloody penalties, should be able to say, as 
some of them do, that there is no evil in the orders, so far as they can 
see ? "Because of swearing the land mourns," now as in the ancient days. 
And now, as in^ the ancient days, the prophet and the priest lead the peo- 
ple astray. 

As to the Body of Man. 

, The bodies of men are created to be the temples of the Holy Spirit. 
'He desires to dwell in them and walk in them. He wills to make them 
strong and fair and beautiful. The bloated, blear-eyed, ill-looking, vile- 
smelling, weak and stumbling creatures who creep across the earth, are 
,not at all what God intended them to be. 

:The first effect of Christian faith is on the soul, but it produces an 
instant reaction on the body. Those who looked on Stephen as he was 
speaking, saw his face as if it had been the face of an angel. Any one 
who has been with Christians a great deal has seen this illumination of 
the human countenance frequently. We saw it in the face of our mother. 
We saw it in the face of our father. We saw it in the face of Mr. Moody. 
We have seen it scores of times, and it is always beautiful to see. 

We have a book entitled ''The History of Initiation." It gives an ac- 
count of the secret idolatries of all nations, from the earliest stages until 
the present time. It is a history of Satanic assault on the temple of the 
Holy Spirit. The bhndfoldings, the halterings, the attempts to terrify, the 
maimings,. and the killings, all are easy to understand when we reflect 



June, 1909. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 51 

that we are here seeing a manifestation of the hatred of the devil for the 
''temple" of the Most High. 

If some one shall say that we have the same sort of thing in a foot- 
ball game, there are two replies : first, that the football game, being open, 
not secret, is free from some of the most degrading characteristics of 
initiations ; and, second, that in general the same remark which we have 
made respecting the lodge ceremonies applies to the game in question. 
Boys and young men are being crippled and killed in all parts of our coun- 
try in the name of sport. This is not the work of God ; it is the work of 

the devil. 

As to the Mode of Salvation. 

The teaching of the Bible is known to you all. It is that men are 
saved from the guilt of sin by the sacrifice of Jesus Christ, and from the 
power of sin by the indwelling of the Holy Spirit. The teaching of all 
heathen religions is equally plain — men are saved, so far as they can be 
saved, by their own efforts. "Saved by grace" and ''Saved by works" are 
two banners under which the human race is enrolled. 

The lodges array themselves in the latter host. They profess to save 
men by rites and ceremonies, which have no relation to the death of Jesus. 
The Savior is not named in their creed. He is not named in the prayers 
of the more important orders. He has no place in the teaching of these 
greater societies. The poor, sinful man who comes to the lodge door is 
sent anywhere except to the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the 
world. It is needless to say to Christians that all who trust in such sys- 
tems are lost men, both here and hereafter. 

As to the Church of God. 

The church is built upon the doctrine of a Saviour. Of course a sys- 
tem which rejects the foundation rejects the superstructure. Organiza- 
tions which do not care for Jesus Christ cannot be interested in His 
church. In fact, they are not. A few ministers and members keep up the 
double relation, but the vast majority of church-members have nothing to 
do with the lodge, and the vast majority of lodge-members have nothing 
to do with the church. 

It is obvious that ministers who wish the friendship of the lodges 
ought, in common honesty, to draw their support from them, just as minis- 
ters who do not believe the Bible to be the Word of God ought not to -draw 
salaries from people who think these ministers believe what they do not. 
But these friends will never do this honest, straightforward thing. They 
wish to draw their salaries from the believers in Jesus, and to get some 
small advantage over their brethren, in the way of special favors on special 
occasions. 

Men are saved by grace, or they are saved by works. The lodges are 
right, or the churches are right. Both are not right, for they deal with 
the same subject in opposite methods. No evil can long exist in a Chris- 
tian land after it is driven out from behind the altar. There is where 
slavery hid. There is where the drink traffic has hidden so long. There is 
where it is hiding now. That is where the lodges get their power. They 
are kept in existence by men who do not attend them. Evil men manage 



52 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



them, and good men who have been entrapped by them, but who will not 
attend them nor denounce them, give theni their standing in the com- 
munity. ..,-:. 

"Wherefore come out from among them, and be separate, saith the 
Lord, and touch not the unclean; and I will receive you, and will be a 
Father unto you, and ye shall be My sons and daughters, saith the Lord 
Almighty." 

And the time is short for some of those who read these words. 



SCHOOL FRATERNITIES HARD HIT. 

Students Resign and Obey California 
Law— Can Pursue Studies. 

Oakland, Cal., May 15.— Preferring 
the right to enter the University of Cali- 
fornia to that of membership in fraterni- 
ties and sororities, 201 of 215 students 
of the Oakland High School, who are 
members of the secret societies, have 
agreed in writing to obey the command 
of the school authorities to give up their 
society affiliations. The announcement 
made by Charles Keyes, principal of the 
school, indicates almost complete vic- 
tory for the board of trustees in its ef- 
fort to enforce the new state law against 
oath-bound organizations in the public 
schools. Of these students who refused 
to sign the pledge as required by the 
board, six were positive in their refusal, 
while eight agreed to give up participa- 
tion in any meetings of the societies they 
belonged to. 



President Northrop of University of Min= 

nesota Indorses Criticisms by 

Head of Cornell. 

Minneapolis, Minn., May 12. — (Spe- 
cial.) — That there are to-day still many 
evils in the fraternity life of all large 
universities resulting in exclusiveness and 
lack of scholarship for the fraternity 
men, is the opinion of President Cyrus 
Northrop of the University of Minne- 
sota. 

Statements made by President Schur- 
man of Cornell University before a body 
of fraternity men scored the system, and 
the Minnesota president agreed with ev- 
erything he said. 

"The conditions which President 
Schurman said applied to fraternity life 
at Cornell apply everywhere," said Pres- 
ident Northrop. '"There is a need at 
present to make fraternity men better 
students." 



HIGH SCHOOL "FRATS" IN OREGON. 

(From the Portland Oregonian.) 

It is admitted by all who know any- 
thing about school affairs that the fra- 
ternities are a foe to discipline, that 
they are a hindrance to study, and that 
they set up miserable little snobbish' 
cliques among the students, which spoil 
school life for the great majority. The 
only reason one can imagine why teach- 
ers should countenance the fraternities 
is that possibly they receive a little re- 
flection of social glory from them. Even 
teachers are sometimes susceptible to 
this influence. .It is regrettable that the 
new Oregon law, which will abolish 
these pestilential societies in our schools, 
cannot go into effect at once. The courts 
have long since outlawed them, and no 
parent who has the good of his children 
at heart tolerates them. The school au- 
thorities of Portland ought to have erad- 
icated them from the schools long ago, 
but happily the new statute will remedy 
their inexcusable remissness. 



POOREST STANFORD SCHOLARS. 

The most successful students among 
the men at Leland Stanford University 
live at home; second in scholarship are 
those in homes not their own ; the next 
lower are dormitory students ; lowest of 
all, students living in fraternity houses. 
Sixteen of these chapter houses are on 
the college campus ; there, too, is one 
dormitory having about the same num- 
ber as are in the sixteen fraternity 
houses taken together. 

Because the dormitory is not very 
well adapted to quiet study, poorer schol- 
arship would naturally be expected there 
than in the chapter houses, which are 
well adapted for study. 

Moreover, that expectation would be 
better warranted because the students in 
the sixteen desirable buildings would, of 



June, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



53 



course, be claimed as selected men. 

Yet in 1908, 28 per cent, of secret so- 
ciety men lost class membership through 
failing to gain class standing as schol- 
ars. At the same time, the same reason 
removed only 12 and 5 tenths from the 
dormitory. Natural prospects and ac- 
tual results were reversed. In spite of 
disadvantages, the dormitory chance of 
retaining membership turned out to have 
been more than twice as good. 

It might be suspected that something 
unusual made this an exceptional year, 
but instead of being an exception it was 
a sample. 

Not once in ten years has dormitory 
scholarship sunk to chapter house level ; 
never in all that time have the chapter 
houses risen in rivalry of the dormitory. 
The lowest grade of scholarship and the 
highest percentage of class suspension 
belong to the Fraternities. 



CONTROL OF SCHOOL ACTIVITIES. 

Some of our readers in this part of 
the country may remember that the 
trouble caused by school frats was shar- 
ed by the high-school of Springfield, 
Mass., and may recall the apparent pur- 
pose of a newcomer at the Y. M. C. A. 
to nevertheless form an organization 
contrary to the spirit of the conclusion 
arrived at by the school board. October 
2^ a more general rule or statement was 
set forth by Superintendent W. F. 
Gordy, and it is surely consistent with 
the idea that a school is conducted for 
the guidance and benefit of the pupils, 
not authoritatively by the pupils them- 
selves, but by the teachers. What is 
particularly noted in this statement is 
the need of balancing the pupil when 
his enthusiasm for some selected interest 
confines his activity so as to threaten the 
result of narrowness. At this point the 
teacher uses watchful care and neces- 
sary authority to aid him in securing the 
breadth that the school provides. Super- 
intendent Gordy 's statement is as fol- 
lows : 

"With the beginning: of the school year va- 
rious organizations of high school pupils, 
botli in the technical and central high 
schools, have come under the definite control 
of the teachers, and certain rules regarding 
school organizations and those who take part 



ir. the literary, musical and other activities 
Lave been put in force. For a number of 
years rules have obtained in regard to ath- 
letic teams with decidedly wholesome effect. 
The matter of extending such regulations to 
the pupils' activities has been carefully dis- 
cussed by the teachers, the practice of other 
institutions, high schools and colleges has 
been ascertained and the effect of such in- 
terests upon the pupils' development noted. 
While it is recognized that the breadth of in- 
terest is valuable for young people of high 
school age, it is also clear that enthusiasm in 
some particular line of activity is likely to 
result in cases of dissipation of energy, with 
the resultant losses in general training. In 
each school a committee of teachers has been 
appointed to direct and supervise all school 
entertainments and the work of the various 
organizations. Where a pupil is failing in 
his regular class work and there is reason to 
believe that his interest in school organiza- 
tions is too great he may be asked to give 
up that interest until his scholarship is sat- 
isfactory. Officers in these organizations are 
required to maintain a passing mark in all 



regular studies." 



BOSTON SCHOOL BOARD PETITION. 

The chairman of the Boston School 
Board having petitioned for legislation 
extending the authority of the school 
committee over pupils as individuals, the 
aim being to secure control, not of secret 
societies as organizations, but of pupils 
as related to societies, a hearing was 
given in Febrtiary. The school superin- 
tendent claimed that no new^ principle 
was involved ; minors attending school 
need advice and control. Difficulties 
have been created by organizations that 
have grown up; yet objectionable socie- 
ties have been kept out by moral suasion. 
However, in case such a society was not 
given up, pupils would have to be ex- 
pelled. Then parents would be likely 
to contest the matter in court, and 
though the committee might win, the 
matter could be made one long pending. 
A special law would show the parent at 
once that nothing could come of an at- 
tempt. 

The head master of Roxbury High 
School spoke of a dinner in a Boston 
hotel, where a school society sung ob- 
jectionable songs. A secret society 
caused a 15-year-old boy to become the 
patient of a Boston doctor. 



04 



CHRISTIAN CYNOiSURE. 



June, 1909. 



Nearly all of 200 headmasters had 
written in opposition to such societies, 
which were likewise opposed by the Na- 
tional Educational Association. 

The headmaster of Brighton High 
School said that a special committee of 
the Massachusetts Teachers' Association 
found opposition to secret societies in 
high schools because they cultivated 
snobbishness, and did away with demo- 
cratic feeling so that class distinctions 
became prevalent. 

The headmaster of the Girls' Latin 
School thought the bill merely prevent- 
ive, but ''An ounce of prevention is 
worth a pound of cure." 

The headmaster of the West Roxbury 
Latin School said the bill would tend 
to preserve the moral acquirements of 
the pupils. 

The committee on education reported 
in the Senate a bill to give the school 
committee of Boston authority to make 
regulations concerning secret societies, 
excepting religious organizations, and to 
expel pupils refusing to live up to such 
regulations. A newspaper paragraph 
treated the matter as follows : 

"The School Board of Boston should 
be given any additional authority it 
needs to deal decisively with the high 
school secret society evil. Suburban 
towns hereabouts and large towns and 
cities elsewhere in the country have 
postponed dealing with this issue, and 
have regretted it deeply. Action taken 
now can scotch what later may take a 
stubborn fight to kill. The public schools, 
supported by rich and poor, open to 
all and based on a fundamental demo- 
cratic instinct of equality of opportuni- 
ty, are not places for setting up socie- 
ties that involve burdens of expense 
upon pupils or their parents, that divert 
attention from legitimate school life and 
that create castes within the school." 



NO CLASS HONORS. 

Some time ago we copied signed mat- 
ter relating to school societies from that 
bright paper called Young People, which 
has more recently spoken editorially on 
the same subject as follows : 

''The young people are greatly exer- 
cised all over the country by reason of 



the agitation against secret societies in 
public schools. Indeed, some parents 
have become so interested in the matter 
that here and there they have carried 
the question into the higher courts of 
the land. In some states the supreme 
courts have decided in favor of the 
school authorities as against the conten- 
tion of the parents. So the sororities 
will have to go. 

"To speak plainly, there is nothing so 
un-American as the school fraternity 
business. It creates distinctions that 
should never for a moment be permitted. 
It gathers together those whose parents 
have a little money, making the boys 
and girls aristocrats of such a spirit ut- 
terly reprehensible to right thinking 
people. 

"Sometimes these societies rent rooms 
in other sections of the cit}^, fit them up 
in clubroom style, and their "doings" are 
sometimes like unto those of clubs of a 
shady character. They harm poorer 
children, subjecting them to mortifica- 
tion and sensitiveness that has some- 
times led to their withdrawal from the 
school simply because the parents could 
not afford the social demands of the 
classes. 

"Things have come to a sorry condi- 
tion when the public school system be- 
comes a social organization, with clubs 
and cliques, considering the fine move- 
ment of their feet in a dance of more 
importance than the development of the 
mind and heart. 

"The writer is personally acquainted 
with a college where, in fifty years, no 
member of a fraternity ever took honors 
in studies ; in this particular school on 
one occasion five prominent young peo- 
ple were graduated with unsigned diplo- 
mas — to get rid of them. They belong- 
ed to rich families and were leaders in 
sororities, but had no time or inclina- 
tion for study. Young people should 
support the movement looking to the re- 
moval of every fraternity from our 
school system." 



OLD WESLEYAN. 

It would be interesting to know how 
many ministers have been educated for 
the Methodist ministry at the Wesleyan 



June, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



55 



college in Middletown, Conn. In edu- 
cating them the institution doubtless car- 
ried out an important part of its design 
when it was founded and called by the 
name Wesleyan, which suggests one of 
the great historic religious movements in 
England, the forming of a society and its 
development into a Christian denomina- 
tion. To the popular mind that denomi- 
nation suggested the opposite of world- 
liness. Plain dress and plain living went 
with devout piety where this society and 
church appeared in America as well as 
in England. Amusements sought by En- 
glish church people were avoided by 
Wesleyan saints, and to live strictly, ab- 
stinently, and piously, marked what came 
to be called Methodism. Methodists 
founded this Wesleyan college at Mid- 
dletown, and it is still under the control 
of the Methodist denomination. 

Yet into this institution secret socie- 
ties have stolen. Initiations and secret 
meetings now take the attention of stu- 
dents and affect their life. Chapter 
houses have become students' homes. The 
name is still Wesleyan ; the life is secret 
and hidden. Not long ago a newspaper 
had this college news : 

*Thi Nu Theta gave its annual dance 
in the chapter house Wednesday even- 
ing. The feature of the occasion was an 
original opera; words and music, cos- 
tumes and scenery prepared by members 
of the chapter. The second dance of the 
year will be given by the German Club 
Monday evening." 



K. O. K. A. 

A prominent journal published on the 
opposite side of the continent says: 
"The governor of California has signed 
a bill prohibiting secret societies in pub- 
lic schools, and public opinion will sus- 
tain the law. In school affairs California 
has long been one of the most progress- 
ive states in the Union." This happens 
to be a recent item to be included in a 
voluminous amount of matter relating to 
its familiar subject. Secret societies in 
schools have given educators no end of 
thought .and trouble, and have incurred 
unlimited condemnation. No matter how 
patiently endured in some colleges, such 
cliques are ruled out of schools as intol- 



erable and to be forbidden by acclama- 
tion. Public schools have not been, after 
all, the only field in which the secret weed 
has grown. Many who have learned to 
read Bestology in the C. M. A. have, of 
course, been school boys, yet this is not 
what made them eligible. On the other 
hand, membership in a school was a con- 
dition apparently intended to be made 
by a Boys' Work Director in the Y. M. 
C. A., though the society he wished to 
form would not be directly connected 
with the school. The Cynosure spoke of 
this case in September, 1908, under the 
heading ''A Flank Movement." In June 
of the same year an article by Mrs. 
Frances C. Blanchard furnished, with 
other things, considerable information 
about the Knights of King Arthur. In the 
same September number was an article 
headed ''A Baptist Loyola," based on the 
report given by a denominational paper 
of a society of boyish Knights formed by 
a Sunday school superintendent. The pa- 
per credited the society with three fea- 
tures, military, secret society and Bibli- 
cal. The Cynosure said among other 
things: "The Sunday school itself was 
already Biblical ; military organization 
and secrecy are added. The additional 
features are precisely those of the Jesuit 
order." 

This society of S. S. Knights doubtless 
belongs to the order of Knights of King 
Arthur, originated by William Byron 
Forbush, who is also father of the 
Knights of King David. Besides these he 
has planned a society for girls who are 
called Queens of Avilon. The business 
designed by Mr. Forbush is conducted by 
Frank Lincoln Masseck, who issues two 
periodicals, sells several books and furn- 
ishes banners, badges and pins. Though 
the society bears the ear-marks of a se- 
cret one, the advertisement of it says: 
"There are initiations for each degree, 
extremely interesting to all the boys, 
grips, etc., but no secrets from parents, 
teachers and pastors. All meetings are 
open to adults." This may mean more 
than would be meant by saying that the 
meetings of the secret society oi women 
called the Eastern Star are open to men, 
while in fact they arc open to no men 
who are not Masons. College societies 
are open to professors who are them- 



56 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



selves initiates. It is hardly credible that 
the K. O. K. A. holds its meetings in so 
public a way as to allow adults to carry 
away the report signs, grips, or other 
things such as the initiates might careful- 
ly keep to themselves. At least here is 
an order with degrees and initiations; it 
has badges, signals and other things na- 
turally looked for in a secret order like 
the C. M. A., which is also composed of 
boys. The drill seems well fitted to pre- 
pare the young for joining older orders 
by and by. 

^The K. O. K. A. at Work" is the 
title of an attractive and approving ac- 
count of the society in a recent number 
of a quarterly which is published joint- 
ly by a state S. S. association and a state 
Bible society. A note at the end of the 
article tells how the plan of the society 
can be obtained. Apparently this state 
S. S. society is disposed to promote this 
Juvenile secret society. 

The society claims the endorsement of 
Marion Lawrence of the International S. 
S. Association, and of others, among 
whom are the secretary of the Unitarian 
S. S. Society, the secretary of the S. S. 
Commission of the diocese of New York, 
the superintendent of the Young Peo- 
ple's Work of the Presbyterian church 
and the boys' secretary of the Y. M. C. 
A. of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

'The scheme has been put to the prac- 
tical test by many workers, in churches 
of all denominations, in the Y. M. C. A., 
in social organizations of all kinds and 
under independent auspices." Constant 
mention of denominations occurs in the 
list of new castles published in the latest 
quarterly issue of ''King Arthur's Her- 
ald." These are a few samples: Holy 
Grail, Immanuel Baptist, Chicago, 111.; 
Shasta, Congregational, Cottonwood, 
Calif. ; Stirling, Presbyterian, Lorain, O. ; 
Lincoln, Universalist, Belfast, Me. ; Ot- 
terbein, Methodist, Otterbein, Ind.'; Kenil- 
worth, Unitarian, Eastport, Me.; and 
they show how the order utilizes prestige 
not primarily its own. Catholic and Pro- 
testant, evangelical and non-evangelical 
are eligible on identical terms. The same 
issue of the Herald, besides giving in 
cypher the monthly pass-words, reports 
various castles, two of whom have these 
castle yells. 



Mystic, Conn., 1321- 
K. O. K. A., K. O. K. A. 

Who are we? Who are we? 
M-Y-S-T-I-C ! 

Mystic, Mystic, 
M, C, double C, double X, I, 

Knights of King Arthur, 



Knights of King Arthur. 

Heidelberg, 251, Greeiiville, Ohio. 
Rackety rack, carack caray! 

Heidelberg Castle two fifty one ! 
Rackety rack, rarack raray ! 

Knights of King Arthur, K. O. K. A. 
Rickety rackety ray ! 

Merlin, Vivien, Morgan le Fay, 
Arthur Pendragon, Galahad, Kay, 

Heidelberg Castle, K. O. K. A. 



PLAYING HORSE. 

We can remember the time when a 
string tied to a stick made a whip, and 
a longer string tied to a shorter stick 
made a pair of reins with which a little 
boy could be driven like a big horse. The 
memory, however, is disiant, for long 
ago the boy who was driver and the boy 
who was a prancing or speeding horse, 
both together, put away childish things. 
It is to be hoped that the play itself still 
goes on; for playing horse, or playing 
bear, elk, beaver or almost anything in 
menagerie, wood, or field, is good as 
long as the players are young children 
and the play is in every sense child's 
play. As children grow older and attain 
youth they turn to other games, tending 
as they approach manhood to give less 
attention even to youthful sports and 
relatively more to study or serious work. 

Childishness, then, is a salient feature 
in mature imitation of what might earl- 
ier have been only childlike. There is a 
difference between what is honorably 
childlike and what is foolishly childish. 
Which is indicated by the reports we 
copy here from a California paper, we 
will let those who have time to read 
them decide for themselves : 

Grand Growl of Curly Bears. 

To-morrow night .Native Son circles 
of the valley will be aroused by the ar- 
rival of a special train bearing the old 
bears of the county seat who come to in- 
stitute a cave of Curly Bears in For- 
tuna. 



Julie, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



57 



Ten cubs have been captured and are 
kept caged for the occasion. The bears 
will make it lively for the youngsters, 
and it is safe to say that after the instal- 
lation ordeal they will be quite mild and 
fit to be at large without danger to the 
public. 

Before adjournment there will be a 
grand growl in the Lane House hall, 
when pig, berries and roots will be 
served by Mrs. Emma O'Connor to every 
Curly Bear that is able to sit up and eat. 



There was something doing in For- 
tuna Native Son Circles on Saturday 
night. As announced in the Beacon last 
week a special train brought about thirty 
bears belonging to Cave No. 6 and the 
work of putting the cubs through their 
pacings began. 

One by one they were released from 
the cage and under the proper guard 
taken into the large hall, where no one 
will ever know what was done to them. 
It was something different each time and 
when they got through with it everybody 
had earned the fine repast Mrs. O'Con- 
nor set before them in the Lane House 
dining room. 

At that feast about sixty were present. 
The company included the new curlies. 

The festivities lasted until early morn- 
ing and when the train pulled out for 
Eureka about two (Sunday) it carried a 
company of curlies who will remember 
the event for many a night to come. — 
The Humboldt Beacon. 



FRATERNAL CONGRESS IN THE 
WOODS. 

Of late the Modern Woodmen have 
been sharpening axes, and the slogan of 
the battle has been Rate Bill. The trou- 
ble arises out of the agreement of the 
Fraternal Congress upon a schedule of 
rates against which some lodges of 
Woodmen protest, and about which they 
have held hot discussion. This is hardly 
surprising; we must have more than 
hinted at probable or at least possible 
difficulty resulting to fraternal insur- 
ance, in speaking of the Fraternal Con- 
gress long ago. The Cynosure has tried 
to show that fraternities can no more 
give something for nothing, in a busi- 



ness way, than any other kind of insur- 
ance organization. Where insurance is 
offered below the actual and unavoidable 
cost, rates will sooner or later rise, or 
else death claims will sink below expec- 
tation. Some such consequence will fol- 
low until water runs up hill or ice boils. 

The National Fraternal Congress, 
which has stirred up these Woodmen, 
was organized in Washington, D. C, 
where it was convened at the call of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen in 
i886. This leads other orders of the 
sort in point of age. The Constitution 
adopted at the first meeting set forth 
the purpose of the organization as ''the 
uniting permanently of all legitimate fra- 
ternal benefit societies for the pur- 
pose of mutual information, benefit and 
protection." Only seventeen of these 
societies were constituent members at 
Washington ; but in Boston, in 1900, 
forty-seven were represented by dele- 
gates. 

A writer not altogether unfriendly to 
this kind of insurance, in speaking of the 
surprising, not to say absurd, success of 
one order, admitted that "we are here 
confronted with a phenomenon that de- 
fies mathematical analysis. The plans 
of the fraternal beneficiary societies may 
be simultaneously abhorrent to mathe- 
matics and friendly to human nature.'' 
Yet most of us feel that a contest be- 
tween human nature and mathematics is 
likely in the long' run to involve risky 
business, while at the same time we 
have an uneasy sense of the incongruity 
of such terms as ''risk" and "insure" 
when applied to identical methods of 
handling trust funds. In the present dis- 
cussion the presumptions are in favor 
of the Congress, for while the methods 
and rates of the societies have often 
been notoriously fallacious, the Congress 
appears to have addressed itself with a 
good degree of ability and consistency 
to the task of reducing the confusion to 
order, and finding a safe and efficient 
course for all to pursue together. The 
mathematical c|uality of the Congress is 
]:>robably superior, but the Woodmen 
doubtless retain the factor of human na- 
ture. 



58 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



THE NATIONA L CHRISTIA N ASSOCIATION 

Invite you to the — ^ 



Annual Conference 

respecting 

SECRET SOCIETIES 

in the 

BELDEN AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Cor. Belden Avenue and Halsted Street, CHICAGO 

Thursday and Friday, June 3rd and 4th, 1909 

^ Among the speakers are Prof. John O. Reed, Dean Michigan 
University, Rev. Wm. Dallmann, President English Synod, Lutheran 

Church, President Blanchard of 

Wheaton College and others. 



Seats Free 



All Welcome 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S ANNUAL RE= 

PORT. 

Dear Brethren and N. C. A. Friends : 

The report I have to bring of the past 
year's work is not what I should hke, 
but it gives reasons for thanksgiving. 

I have been enabled to give the usual 
number of addresses to audiences com- 
paring well with those of other years. A 
fair number of subscriptions to the Cyno- 
sure have been secured. Collections ^lavc 
been generally light, while expenses have 
increased. The figures are as follows : 
Number of anti-secrecy addresses given, 
117; other addresses, 79; approximate 
number of calls made, 2,231 ; number of 
Cynosure subscriptions taken, 813 ; col- 
lections (aside from moneys used in 
State Conventions), $247.48; receipts for 
Cynosure subscriptions secured, $807.10. 
Expenses: Hotel, etc., $123.20; railroad 
fares, $344.81 ; postage, stationery and 
printing, $14.50. 

For the first time in the twenty-five 
years I have sought to serve you, I am 
left without the comfort and cheer of 
the dear father, who has been the best 
human support I have known. Stand- 
ing in the shadow of our great loss, I 
may be permitted to record my apprecia- 
tion of the heritage which is mine. 
Brothers could scarcely have been closer 
in thought and action than father and 
myself. Our lives have been directed 
along parallel lines. Our tastes, ambi- 



tions and aspirations took the same gen- 
eral direction. He has led ; I have sought 
to follow. As he has been passing into 
the sunset shadow, our lives have 
seemed to get closer, and I think I have 
appreciated more those sterling qualities 
of heart and mind, which have crowned 
his life with success. His work in Chi- 
cago, Washington and Boston is too well 
known to need any comment from me. 
As your Eastern Secretary, it has been 
my privilege ' to build on the founda- 
tion which he laid. Aside from the 
prime mover of this reform, the hon- 
ored President Jonathan Blanchard, 
probably no one of those in the better 
life have been permitted to accomplish 
as much for the work we love as he. The 
divine, coupled with the common sense 
in his life, brought to his aid those of 
like faith and practice. The radiance of 
his sunset in this life is, I believe, only 
to be excelled by his entrance into the 
Glory World. 

To harmonize with my nature I have 
been compelled in the holding of Con- 
ventions and pushing of work in the field 
assigned to me to work along independ- 
ent and sometimes new lines. That God 
has honored my humble efibrts goes with- 
out saying. The record is known. I 
have assisted in holding four State Con- 
ventions since last we met. In Ohio, 
Indiana, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 
It is my judgment that these gatherings 



June, 1909. 



OHRISTIAN CYNOSUIIE. 



59 



are worth to the Cause of Christ all they 
have cost of money and effort. Much 
work has been bestowed upon them. 
Fruitage has naturally followed in many 
ways. Friends have been awakened ; 
new friends found ; many have been 
warned who would likely otherwise have 
been misled ; God's glory has been sought 
and in some degree attained. Their ef- 
fect on the great blizzard of secrecy, 
which is sweeping over this country, 
freezing that which is pure and lovely in 
the Church, family and State, may be 
little seen or felt, but God only knows 
what would be the condition were these 
barriers removed ! 

My appeals have been as heretofore in 
the school, college and seminary, as there 
has been opportunity, for there are tliQ 
men and women of to-morrow. I re- 
joice much in the many opportunities for 
sowing the seeds of light and truth in 
such favored soil. 

As a people we sing of liberty, we 
pray for liberty, we rejoice in liberty. 
The red blood of liberty is in our veins. 
Are the young men and women of this 
country to cower and cringe under the 
lash and slavery of the Lodge? To ask 
the question is to answer, Let them but 
know that it is born of the pit, that the 
oaths and conduct of the Lodge would 
take away their liberty to serve the living 
and true God, and they will assert their 
independence in such fashion as will rock 
anew the "cradle of liberty" and make 
the Bunker Hill of the revolution fade in 
comparison. 

Bless God, the liberty-loving spirit 
won't die. Like "truth crushed to earth," 
it will "rise again !" Let us look with 
expectation for young America to cast 
off the Lodge yoke ! 

Is Not This the Day of Opportunity in 
Our Work? 

The millions who, in their ignorance, 
have been handing over the hard-made 
Lodge bricks to their taskmasters, cry 
for a leader to the better land. Shall 
we falter and fail because the enemy 
has come in like a flood? Shall we not 
the rather arise to our opportunity, and 
in the spirit of Him whose we are, and 
whom we serve, kindle anew the beacon 
fires that shall show the way of Him, 



who is "the life" and "hght" and "in 
whom there is no darkness at all ?" 

W. B. Stoddard. 



FRIENDS IN OHIO TAKE NOTICE. 

The Eastern Secretary expects soon to 
be at work in your midst. The summer 
conventions of your state have been well 
sustained. Where shall the Convention 
meet this year? Bellefontaine and Lima 
have each been suggested as desirable 
because of location. Friends of the 
Free Methodist church in Columbus 
would be glad to have the State Meeting 
again in their city. The Cynosure is 
open for suggestions. Where would the 
State Meeting likely do the most good? 
Let all write who are interested. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOOD'S LETTER. 

Brinkley, Ark., March 17, 1909. 
Rev. Wm. L Phillips, Chicago : 

Dear Brother — Your letter to hand. I 
received the book you sent. Many 
thanks. 

I am here at Brinkley for a few days. 
I have a sister here and I came over to 
see her because of the storm which al- 
most wiped this town off" of the map. All 
the frame buildings but fifteen are split 
up like kindling wood, and all the brick 
buildings are in heaps, not one left stand- 
ing. All the churches were blown down 
except the Catholic, and it is wrecked. I 
found my sister all right. She did not 
get hurt. The stomi did her property 
about one hundred dollars' worth of dam- 
age. 

I am so glad that you sent the books. 
I take pleasure in showing them to the 
ministers. I chanced to meet my sis- 
ter's pastor. I got all my books and 
showed them to him. He is a Knight 
of Pythias. He looked at the books ana 
then looked at me and said : "You are 
a brave woman ; it is a wonder some of 
these lodge brothers don't kill you ; yet 
I will say. these secret orders air i; curse^ 
I will tell you what put me out with 
them. I was at the Hall one night and 
we were discussing some very important 
subjects and one of the elders tried to 
settle it in a Godly way, when one of 
the worst characters in the town said to 
him : 'You remember vou are not in the 



60 



GIIRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



church up here.' When he said that I 
walked out and have been out since." 

He said : "Some ministers don't go, but 
send their money to the Lodge, and are 
no better than the ones that go." I said : 
"Yes, 'brother, you are right; if I don't 
■go to the saloon, but send my money to 
help run it, I am no better than the bar- 
tender. 

One minister that is pastoring about 
six hundred members in Pine Bluff, Ark., 
has a deacon that is a Worshipful Mas- 
ter of a lodge, so the Worthy Matron of 
the Eastern Star told me. This great 
Pastor belongs to two orders, and yet he 
says that no man that is "a Master oi 
the Lodge can be a deacon in his 
Church." Don't you think that strange for 
a man to belong to a thing and know 
that it is wrong and yet be trying to get 
a mote out of his brother's eye? That 
is what Jesus called hypocrisy. 

I was reading a sermon the other day 
of this great lodge man. He had taken 
his text in the sixth chapter of Daniel 
and second verse : He said a man ought 
to belong to some other organization 
aside from the church. Daniel was a 
man of God and yet he was the presi- 
d£nt above the three ; he said, Daniel was 
a statesman and yet a man of God. When 
I read the sermon, I said, poor blind 
preacher ; blind . leading the blind ; and 
all will fall into the ditch together. He 
had not given it a thought why Daniel 
was down in Babylon. Daniel was car- 
ried down there a captive ; he did not 
bow to Babylon's altar blind-folded, with 
some Babylonian's drawers on with one 
leg rolled up to his knee, with a blue 
rope around his neck, with his left hand 
under the Bible, and his right on the 
Bible with the square and compass. Dan- 
iel did not swear to have his throat cut 
from ear to ear. Daniel was m Babylon, 
but he did not bow the knee to the image 
of gold, like these preachers of this day. 
They are in the Lodge for the money, 
and that is Babylon's Golden Image. I 
said, poor fellow, he ought to read Dan- 
iel 8 123-25 ; he would see how this last 
King is destroying the people. Verse 
25 says, he caused the craft to prosper! 
He is the King that is standing up now, 
but this poor preacher is one of those 
Kings in spiritual Babylon — in halls 



speaking dark words, keeping secrets for 
drunkards, and whoremongers and sa- 
loonists, and yet standing up before the 
people and trying to clear themselves. I 
wish we did have some men that would 
not bow down to a few dollars. 

I saw a great evangelist traveling 
through this country not long ago, and 
I asked him if he was a member of a 
secret order? He said, "No! I used to 
belong to several, but since I have seen 
that they are idolatrous I came out of 
them all." I said, do you warn the peo- 
ple about this great Baal worship? He 
said, "No, Sister Wood, I don't." Why? 
He said, "I am a coward, and the whole 
ministry in this -country is a coward." He 
turned and asked Rev. J. G. Bailey: 
"Isn't it true that we are all cowards?" 
Mr. Bailey answered and said, "I used 
to belong to the Odd Fellows. I was the 
Noble Father in the lodge, but ever since 
I found that the lodge was idol worship, 
I have never failed to expose it. I don't 
allow their annual sermon nor their 
burial ceremonies in the church that I 
pastor." The evangelist said, well the 
most of us preachers are afraid of our 
bread, or that some might kill us, and he 
said, "Sister Woods, I am going from 
this day to take a stand against the 
cursed thing.'* 

Give us some more ministers like Paul, 
that they may stand up against the God- 
dess Diana of to-day. 

Yours for the work, 

Lizzie Woods. 



REV. W. B. STODDARD'S LETTER. 

Chicago, 111., May 14, 1909. 
Dear Cynosure : 

I am here to help our General Secre- 
tary and contribute what I may to the 
success of our annual meeting. Chica- 
go is perhaps not the center of the earth, 
but in the great west I judge there is 
no more advantageous place for a large 
gathering. 

When I last reported it will be remem- 
bered I was at work in Boston; On 
Sabbath, April 18, I was given oppor- 
tunity to preach in the First United 
Presbyterian church, where I had gone 
with the expectation of listening to its 
much beloved pastor. Our friends are 
not few in this congregation. The New 



June, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



61 



England work goes forward under the 
leadership of the Secretary, Mrs. A. E. 
Stoddard, who has for so long been 
identified with her husband in this work. 

Returning to New York an address 
was given to a goodly number of young 
people, who gathered in the Norwegian 
Lutheran church, of which Rev. C. S. 
Everson is pastor. Happening near the 
Prospect Heights Presbyterian church, 
Brooklyn, I was informed that Dr. E. D. 
Bailey was pastor, and that it was pray- 
er meeting evening. Sure enough the 
pastor was our Brother Bailey, and the 
prayer meeting was exceptionally help- 
ful. A run over to Corrona, L. L, as- 
sured me that Brother Lagville had not 
grown weary in well doing. He keeps 
Cynosure and tracts in circulation. On 
the 25th of April I found opportunity 
for a message in opposition to the lodge 
in the Second U. P. church. New York, 
Rev. H. Tate, pastor. That the congre- 
gation was divided in thought relative to 
secret societies was evident. My effort 
was ably backed by the pastor and his 
aids. In the evening of the same day I 
found opportunity for testimony at a 
mission meeting conducted by friends of 
the Christian Missionary Alliance. At a 
meeting of the English Missouri Lu- 
theran pastors in Paster Schumin's 
church, we joined in an interesting dis- 
cussion as to the best methods of pres- 
entation of the anti-secrecy work. 

A day was very profitably spent in 
looking up Baltimore friends. Several 
expressed the desire for more lectures in 
the fall. On May 4 I delivered the lec- 
ture advertised to be given in the Grace 
Lutheran church, Washington, D. C. 
Pastor Doermann ihad done his part in 
the advertisement.. The number pres- 
ent was about the same as at a former 
lecture. The time evidently was unfa- 
vorable for large attendance. Pastor 
Doermann is not discouraged, but says 
"we will try again." Those present gave 
close attention. 

In my run to this city, which has oc- 
cupied my time for the past ten days, 
stops were made at Zanesville, Columbus, 
Xenia and Dayton, Ohio. Also Berne, 
Decatur and Fort Wayne, Ind. My work 
was chiefly at Berne, Ind. There is no 
abatement of the splendid interest at 



this place. The recent addresses of 
President Blanchard were praised by 
those who heard them. Fifty subscrip- 
tions were secured for the Cynosure. I 
attended a meeting in the Evangelical 
church, Rev. Mr. Maas, pastor, and lis- 
tended to an able presentation of gospel 
truth. In the large Mennonite church I 
found no decline in interest. The build- 
ing was crowded, as usual, during the 
Sabbath School. Your agent responded 
to the invitation of the Superintendent 
in a brief address. Rev. Mr. Clauser ar- 
ranged for me to speak of the Lodge 
evil to the young people gathered in his 
country church. In the town church of 
the Missionary Association, I also had 
opportunity for expression, Rev. H. H. 
Amstutz, pastor. The closing exercises 
of the Berne schools and the mission- 
aries of the Mennonite church were 
largely claiming attention and support. 
Evidently this people is learning ''to 
abound in the work of the Lord." The 
calls at Decatur and Fort Wayne were 
cut short by the hurrying here. Pastors 
were enlisted in these places as else- 
where. 

It is nearly time for the Ohio 
State Meeting. Those who attended last 
year remember our privilege. I hope 
soon to give time and place, but now 
let all center in the Annual Meeting here. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



Young people are not half so liable to 
shy at distinctive principles as they are 
at suspicious looks and the cold shoul- 
der. 



Heaven's best training schools for 
Christian work and missionary workers 
are the prayer circles of the young men 
and women. 



Pride and vanity shut the door in the 
face of Christ. 



The true Christian walks by faith and 
not by feeling. 



It is well to talk about religion ; it is 
better to experience it. 



Where piety prevails there abide pur- 
ity, patience and peace. 



62 



CHRISTIAN PYNp^URE. 



June, 1909. 



SEEKING CHRIST IN THREE SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

The appended open letter was written 
in reply to a note received by the writer 
from a man connected with a mission 
movement begun by men of our synod. 
This note contained the following para- 
graph : 

"I was instructed to notify you that 
it will be unnecessary to send anyone 
here to do mission work. We will make 
other arrangements for the future." 

Hamilton, Ohio, April, 1909. 
Dear Sir — Your note might have mys- 
tified me, but a letter from the pastor 
now serving you and information gained 
from other sources clear up any possi- 
ble mystery. I did not know that this 
pastor would now take care of you when 
formerly he could not. It seems to me 
simply a case of affording protection to 
an un-Christian system that brought 
about this change. I hope I will not tire 
you with this letter. I also hope the 
said pastor will get to read it. 

About two years ago a man who had 
become unchurchly, but then desired 
again to go to the Lord's Supper, came 
to me. I advised him to go to church 
for awhile and show that he was in 
earnest, saying that in six weeks we 
would have the Lord's Supper again. He 
agreed to do this. Then I said: ''You 
belong to no secret orders?" He re- 
plied that he did belong. I said to him 
that the Odd Fellows have no Jesus 
Christ in their prayers. Well, he finally 
promised he would prove to me that they 
have. Can you perhaps explain why 
this man never came with the proof? Can 
the Odd Fellows furnish the evidence 
that their prayers are really Christian? 

July II, 1908, a man from the Presby- 
terian church made the attempt to prove 
to me that the Odd Fellows' lodge pray- 
ers are Christian. He furnisihed a copy 
of the prayers. I read them aloud to 
him and then asked him to show me 
where the name of Christ was given. 
He admitted that it was missing. He 
requested me to write the Noble Grand 
of his lodge for an explanation. I did 



so July 13, 1908, and am still waiting 
for an answer. 

June 6, 1908, a man came to my house, 
a Mason and an Odd Fellow. His one 
son is a minister. We talked about the 
lodge. He said, "If Christ cannot be 
in the lodge I am coming out of it." 
He promised to read one of my books 
and return it. I have not 'heard from 
him since. 

Last fall a man — a member of the 
Modern Woodmen — declared I was 
wrong and he could easily prove 'that 
Christ was not omitted from the pray- 
ers of his lodge. He was to come again 
in two weeks and show me. Four months 
and more are gone and he has not come 
back. 

My dear friend, do you think these 
men would keep so silent if they could 
prove that the minister was wrong ? The 
fact is, there are people of all shades of 
belief and unbelief in the lodge, and 
many of them despise Jesus Christ. But, 
now, what does Jesus say: 'Whosoever 
shall confess Me before men, him will I 
confess also before My father which is 
in heaven. But whosoever shall deny 
Me before imen, ihim will I also deny be- 
fore My Father which is in heaven." 
Matthew 10:32-33. 

What spiritual and moral good can tJhe 
lodges do, if in their prayers they have 
omitted Christ out of regard for those 
who do not want Him? 'Without Me 
ye can do nothing." John 15 :5. If the 
lodge has no Christ, it as a lodge has no 
true faith. "Whatsoever is not of faith 
is sin." Ramans 14:23. "Without faith 
it is impossible to please God." Hebrews 
1 1 '.G-y. 

The general talk is that we must have 
the lodge for protection. The trouble is 
that people do not believe in God's pro- 
tection as they should. I believe this : "1 
have been young and now am old; yet 
have I not seen the rig^hteous forsaken, 
nor his seed begging bread." Psalms 
37 :25. "Cursed be the man that trust- 
eth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, 
and whose heart departeth from the 
Lord." Jeremiah 17:5. "It is better to 
trust in the Lord than to put confidence 
in man." Psalm 118:8. Can any one 
show even one case where God has failed 



June, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



63 



to provide for His children? But the 
broken pledges of lodges are of daily re- 
currence. 

Your present pastor admits that in 
many things the lodges are against the 
Bible. If they are against the Bible, how 
can we Christian ministers hold our 
peace ? I should hate to be classed among 
the watchmen of whom it is said : ''They 
are all ignorant, they are all dumb dogs, 
they cannot bark; sleeping, lying down, 
loving to slumber." Isaiah 56:10. 

And I tell you, it pays to testify 
against the lodge. Two years ago one 
of my young men joined a lodge and 
quit going to communion, because in my 
church he would not be admitted. To- 
night, before I had finished the first page 
of this letter, he was here. ''May I go 
to communion Sunday? I have left the 

lodge." My dear Mr. , this young 

man has shaken off a dangerous yoke, of 
which you read in II. Corinthians 6:14- 
18. 

But this letter is getting long. Be- 
fore closing I beg you to prove to me 
that I am wrong. I want to be correct- 
ed. But if the truth is on my side, then 
the lodge is wrong and must be attacked. 
If God attacks the lodge in the Bible, 
why should His minister protect the 
lodge ? 

I hope you will show this letter to 
your friends, and especially to the pas- 
tor. Let us study and reason this mat- 
ter and find the truth. "The truth shall 
make you free." John 8:32. 

With kindly greetings, yours, 

C. F. W. Allwardt. 
— Lutheran Standard, May i, 1909. 



A PREFERRED ALTERNATIVE. 

The Baptist Home Mission Monthly 
is a bright and ably edited journal, pub- 
lished in New York City. From its 
May number we copy an editorial relat- 
ing to "oath-bound criminals." 

"Perhaps it was necessary that an as- 
sassination like that of the famous 
Italian detective, Joseph Petrosino, 
should occur before the people of this 
easy-going country would awaken to the 
duty of suppressing the Black Hand at 
any cost. Petrosino was the ablest Ital- 
ian detective in the United States, and 



had done more than all other police of- 
ficers put together to detect and bring to 
punishment Italian criminals. The in- 
creasing number of crimes of the Black 
Hand type — bomb-throwing, blackmail, 
threats and assassination — and the ina- 
bility of the police to find the perpetrat- 
ors, have produced a reign of terror in 
many sections. 

To prevent the coming of more of 
these undesirable immigrants, Petrosino 
was sent to Italy to obtain evidence that 
would make it difficult for members of 
the Italian secret orders to get through 
Ellis Island. In the discharge of his 
duty, the fearless officer was shot down 
in Palermo. The Italian government, 
which was thoroughly in favor of Petro- 
sino's mission abroad, and which would 
be only too happy to discover the Camor- 
ra chiefs, will doubtless do all it can to 
discover the assassins ; but, judging 
from the past, little will come of the 
police efforts. What can be done here 
remains to be seen. 

"We fully agree with the New York 
Times that the situation has become in- 
tolerable, and that the Black Hand out- 
rages must be stopped, if it be necessary 
in order to do it to prohibit immigration 
from Sicily, or from Italy altogether. 
Better to put a race under a ban than 
to have this free land terrorized by a 
band of oath-bound criminals who neith- 
er regard law nor fear God or man. 
Petrosino's martyrdom should result in 
some measures that will make America 
unhealthy for Italian murderers." 



INDUBITABLY A PEST. 

The Fort Wayne Daily News, in 
speaking of a statement concerning fra- 
ternities in the high school issued by the 
School Board, said that it merited "the 
serious consideration of every parent in 
Fort Wayne," and added : "It merits 
more — the hearty co-operation of all, 
in the board's endeavor to eliminate what 
is indubitably a pest." Claiming that the 
illegality of such a combination of pupils 
should, alone, be "enough to bring the 
foot of every right-thinking parent down 
hard," it condemned, moreover, the 
caste and snobbery resulting among the 
pupils, while charging the fraternity with 



64 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1909. 



interfering sadly with class-room work. 
It also cited experience, both local and 
more general, as having shown the sys- 
tem to exert an influence against the 
legitimate ends of the high school, and 
pleaded the character of the school itself 
as an institution supported by public ex- 
pense, and as, at least in theory, oflfering 
an equal chance to all, ''unhampered by 
cliques, and unembarrassed by the as- 
sumption of superiority by groups of 
half-baked little kids." Perhaps the lan- 
guage could have been improved, but this 
support of the school board is commend- 
able. 

The Cincinnati Star, also, when allud- 
ing to the law passed by the Ohio Leg- 
islature last year, and brought to the at- 
tention of the Union Board of High 
Schools in Cincinnati by the superintend- 
ent, said : 

''There is at least one fraternity in ev- 
ery high school, and in Hughes there 
are two — Delta Beta and Triginta Op- 
timi. In Walnut Hills there is the Delta 



Alpha Phi frat and a girls' sorority. At 
Woodward the famous old Tredecim fra- 
ternity formerly existed, but has been 
succeeded by the Mystic Seven and 
Knights, as the Tredecim was only 
founded to run thirteen years, with thir- 
teen members in the active chapter each 
year. The order to the high school prin- 
cipals to drive out the "frats" will be is- 
sued by Superintendent Dyer as soon as 
he shall obtain authority from the board 
to do so." 



Prejudice produces spiritual blind- 
ness. 



Fear should be banished when duty 
calls. 



Eccentricity is a mole on the face of 
character. 



Better be poor, with an untarnished 
name, than have plenty of money and a 
ruined character. 



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and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
niake a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Post Office at Chicago, IJl., under Act of M irch 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Testimony of Rev. Dr. John Earl 65 

Minutes of Annual Meeting 65 

Letter from Cyrus Smith, Iowa 68 

Church and Lodge Statistics 69 

Treasurer's Annual Report ! 70 

"What Is Freemasonry?" by Rev. Wil- 
liam Dallm.ann 7j 

Report of Auditors 75 

Address by President C. A. Blanchard 7G 

"A Personal Word," by the new president, 

Rev. Samuel H. Swartz 82 

Death of Mrs. Hills 83 

Lodge Sympathy for Criminal 83 

Guests of Aletheia Grotto 84 

Wilson Masonry Again , 85 

Honors Paid For 86 

College Fraternity Rushing 86 

So There 87 

American Masons in England 87 

Profanation 8S 

Twenty-five Cent Links 90 

Resolutions New England Board relative 

to the late Rev. J. P. Stoddard 91 

Good Words from Rev. E. Zath 91 

Secretary Stoddard's Letter 92 

Mrs. Lizjie Wood's Letter 93 

Debate with an Oddfellow .94 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This hook gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
gravings. The oaths, ohligations and lectures are 
quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flezible 
ClOtll, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes : "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARBON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
shioing Freemasons in the Christiaii Church. 10 
cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THL 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By "Spectator," Acianta, Ga. 16 pages J 
5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigious 
system, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion' ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
Interesting. 30 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workinfifs of 
Freemasonry," by Ex-President Charles G. Finney, 
of Oberiin College. 

President Finney was a "brigrht Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have, 5 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

Its relation to civil government and the Chpis- 
tian religion. By President J. Blanchard. The 
un-Christian, anti-republican and despotic char- 
acter of Freemasonry is proved from the highest 
Masonic authorities. 5 cents. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly tw iHe world; and in secret have 



said nothing," John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLII. 



CHICAGO, JULY, 1909. 



NUMBER 3 



The Annual Meeting 

Thursday and Friday, June 3rd and 4th, 1909. 

formation I can gather, and from an ex- 
tended observation of the influence of 
secret societies upon Ihe church, I am 
not only not a secret society man myself ^ 
but I am opposed to all forms of secret 




organization. 



JOHN A. EARL. 



John A. Eirl. 
Pastor Belden Avenue Baptist Church. 

The church of Jesus Christ is good 
enough for me. The preacher v^ho 
thinks it is necessary to belong to any 
secret order in order to get to the front 
in his calling is mistaken. I have never 
taken the vows of secrecy, and therefore 
cannot speak from experience, but I 
have read the books of Brother Blanch- 
ard vrho was opposed to secret societies 
before he was born. From all the in- 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING. 

MRS. N. E. KELLOGG, SECRETARY. 

The Thirty-fifth Annual Meeting of 
the National Christian Association, Op- 
posed to Secret Societies, was held in the 
Belden Avenue Baptist Church, June 3d 
and 4th, 1909. 

President Chas. A. Blanchard called 
the meeting to order and requested Rev. 
T. C. Sproul of Pittsburg, Pa., to read 
a portion of Scripture, after which Rev. 
H. H. George, also from Pennsylvania, 
led in prayer. 

Minutes of last Annual Meeting were 
read and approved. 

The Annual Report of the Board of 
Directors was read by Mr. J. M. Hitch- 
cock and approved. 

Rev. H. H. George was called upon 
for an address at this time, as it was 
necessary for him to leave the city soon. 
He gave a most interesting address, in 
which he showed that "lodge religion is 
not only unchristian, it is anti-chrisfian, 
and will therefore be utterly over- 
thrown." 

The Treasurer read his annual report ; 
and also the report of the Auditors, 
which vouched for the accuracy of the 
Treasurer's report. The Auditors re- 
port was signed by Prof. J. P. Shaw of 
Chicago Metropolitan Business College 



66 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



and H. F. Kletzing, publisher, Christian 
Witness Company. It was voted to re- 
ceive and approve both reports. 

Brief addresses were given at this 
time by Rev. G. A. Pegram, Poplar 
Bluff, Mo., and by Mrs. E. A. Whitham, 
.and Mrs. Mary L. Brumbaugh of Pon- 
tiac. 111. ; Rev. T. C. Sproul and Rev. S. 
H. Swartz also gave interesting ad- 
dresses. Rev. Mr. Swartz spoke of the 
fact that the Christian church is being 
depleted in numbers by secret lodges, 
which offer a way of salvation, which 
does not humble the heart. 

Mrs. J. W. Fischer of Wheaton, III, 
suggested that since there is great need 
•of laborers in this work, that Theological 
Seminaries and other institutions of 
learning should be furnished with infor- 
;mation in regard to secret orders and 
especially as to their anti-Christian char- 
.acter. 

The President of the Association was 
called on and spoke briefly on the 
general condition of affairs, and showed 
that there are cheering tokens of the 
triumph of Truth. 

The membership roll of those present 
.at the morning session is as follows : 

Names and Denomination. State. 

:Rev. H. H. George. . . . R. P Pa. 

llev. J. T. Sproul R. P Iowa 

J. M. Hitchcock Independ. ..111. 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard D. C. 

"Rev. C. A. Blanchard . . Congl. 111. 

Mrs. N. E. Kellogg 

Mrs. J. B. Fischer. .... 

W. I. Phillips 

Rev. Sam'l H. Swartz. M. E " 

J. L. Culler M. E. . . .Okla. 

Rev. G. A. Pegram... M. E Mo. 

Rev. A. R. Merrill Weslyan .Mich. 

E. A. Cook Cong'l 111. 

"Frank E. Noe Wesl'n M. Ohio 

Mrs. W. Orvis Cong'l 111. 

Mrs. M. B. Phillips... " " 

Mrs. E. A. Whitham. .M. E " 

T^ev. E. B. Stewart... .U. P " 

Rev. E. B. Bergesen. . . Luth " 

Mr. Geo. Windle Breth " 

Elder Jos. Amick Breth " 

It was voted that the Chairman name 
^committees. 

Committees were appointed by the 
President as follows : — • 



jj 



>j 



)) 



}) 



On Nominations : 

Rev. S. H. Swartz, 111. ; J. T. Culler, 
Okla.; G. A. Pegram, Mo.; Rev. Mer- 
rill, Mich.; Frank Noe, Ohio; J. T. 
Sproul, Iowa. 

On Resolutions and Memorials : 

W. B. Stoddard, Wash., D. C. ; Mrs. 
Mary E. Brumbach, 111; Rev. A. R. 
Merrill, Mich. 

On Plan of Work : 

W., I. Phillips, 111. ; Miss Fischer, 111. ; 
J. T. CuUor, Okla. ; J. T. Sproul, Iowa ; 
G. A. Pegram, Mo. 

On Finance: 

E. A. Cook, Jos. Amick, Geo. Windle. 

On New Members : 

Mrs. N. E. Kellogg, Mrs. E. A. Whit- 
ham, Mrs. M. B. Phillips. 

After the appointment of committees, 
Rev. B. E. Bergensen spoke of the po- 
sition which the church of Christ should 
maintain in reference to secret lodges, 
which teach religion, but a Christless re- 
ligion. 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard of Washington, 
D. C, was called for and spoke of how 
in the anti-lodge work the Providence of 
God is often shown, and gave interest- 
ing instances which had come under his 
own observation. 

The following report of the Nominat- 
ing Committee was given by the Chair- 
man of the committee : 

For President, S. H. Swartz; Record- 
ing Secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 

For Board of Directors, C. A. Blanch- 
ard, B. E. Bergensen, J. M. Hitchcock, 
S. H. Swartz, Geo. Windel, Robert 
Clark, E. A. Cook, E. B. Stewart, J. T. 
Logan, J. L. Moore, C. J. Haan. 

For Auditors, J. P. Shaw, H. L. 
Kletzing, W. B. Rose. 

The report was adopted. 

Rev. E. B. Stewart gave an address 
on Masonry, and by reference to an ora- 
tion made by a Masonic Minister 
showed that the organization is selfish, 
narrow and superfluous. 

Rev. A. R. Merrill of Holland, Mich., 
spoke on the selfishness and hypocrisy 
of lodgism. 

Rev. Walter Elliott, a returned mis- 
sionary from China said : "The secret 
societies of China are legions." He ex- 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



67 



pressed his sympathy with the Conven- 
tion. 

The new President, Rev. Samuel H. 
Swartz, was introduced and made a stir- 
ring appeal to renewed courage and 
faithful service. He said that we are 
called to stand against a false religion ; 
against an enemy to our country, to the 
home, and a menace to the church. 

Notices were given and meeting ad- 
journed to meet in the main Auditorium 
of the church in the evening. 

The evening program was carried out 
as printed; a fair audience in attend- 
ance. 

Friday Morning. 

W. B. Stoddard in the chair. Devo- 
tional exercises began at 9 o'clock and 
were participated in by those present. 
President Swartz took the chair and 
Rev. W. B. Stoddard gave the report of 
Committee on Resolutions. The Me- 
morial part of the report was adopted. 
After considerable discussion and some 
alteration and the addition of a resolu- 
tion in regard to Labor Unions, the re- 
port was adopted as a whole unani- 
mously. 

The Committee on Plan of Work 
found it difficult to meet as a com- 
mittee and the following suggestions 
were offered by the different members; 

Your Committee recommends that the 
various States be encouraged to secure 
State lecturers and to push their State 
organization, and that this Association 
aid such movements as during the past 
years, by small appropriation of cash 
and a liberal appropriation of Cynosure 
subscriptions. 

It also recommends that fraternal 
delegates be appointed to meet with the 
different annual conferences, synods, 
etc., as in the past, only that this work 
be more- largely entered into if possible. 

It is also most earnestly urged that all 
denominational gatherings be mernorial- 
ized to take action respecting the rela- 
tion of secret societies to the Church of 
Christ. 

We also suggest that symposiums of 
ministers and theological instructors be 
obtained on this reform. 

We heartily approve of the fund con- 
tributed by Rev. Edward Hildreth for 
the supply of anti-secrecy literature to 



the graduates of the Chicago and Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminaries, and 
we suggest to the Board of Directors 
that this work be extended so as to 
reach the graduates of other theological 
and Bible schools of our country, during 
the coming year. 

We most urgently suggest that a defi- 
nite work be undertaken among the 
women. The lodge is an enemy espe- 
cially of the home, and we recommend 
that Mrs. Mary L. Brumbaugh be en- 
gaged to speak on the Lodge and 
Church. She has had a knowledge of 
the Masonic lodge from the days of 
Morgan, having been born in Western- 
New York. She is also a prominent W. 
C. T. U. worker. 

We believe that the most imperative 
need of the Association at the present 
time is a General Field Agent located 
here at Chicago, who shall give his time 
to the organizing of the work of the va- 
rious States throughout the country. 
The central West has been the" backbone- 
of this movement and it seems to your 
Committee that for some years the work 
has been neglected here. 

We urge every pastor of an anti- 
secret church to preach on the subject at 
least once a year. Let him also get an 
experienced lecturer to address his peo- 
ple at least once a year. To make it 
more convenient and less expensive, let 
all the churches of a given community 
arrange for a course of lectures to be- 
given, one in each church. 

Let every Sunday-school and Young 
People's Society of anti-secret churches 
study this subject at least once a year. 
We have a lesson on Temperance once 
a quarter. Why not one on the Lodge? 

We suggest that several anti-secret de- 
nominations in a State arrange together 
to support a State Lecturer; and ar- 
range also to take one church after an- 
other in consecutive order, so as to 
waste neither time nor money. 

We wish that every church would fol- 
low the example of the Christian Re- 
formed church and take an annual oft'er- 
ing for the National Christian Associa- 
tion ; then the plan of work could be car- 
ried forward with power and success. 
• Extracts from letters to Convention- 
were read and it was voted that the- 



68 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



Cynosure editor insert* at his discretion. 

Recess was taken until 2 p. m. 

Rev. G. A. Pegram was called to the 
chair at the opening of the afternoon 
session and Rev. C. DeLeeum read the 
Scripture. 

During "Seceeder's Conference" M. 
A. Housholder and others testified 
against the various lodges with which 
they had been allied. 

Rev. C. De Leeum tendered the greet- 
ing of the Christian Reformed (Hol- 
land) church to the Association in an 
earnest address. The following persons 
were recommended by the Committee 
and elected members of the corporate 
body of the National Christian Associa- 
tion : 

Mr. J. G. Miller, President Mt. Mor- 
ris College, Mt. Morris, 111. ; Elder D. L. 
Miller, Mt. Morris, III; Mr. J. O. 
Thomas, Mt. Morris, 111. ; Rev. Galen B. 
Royer, Elgin, 111. ; Mrs. Mary L. Braum- 
bach, Odell, 111.; Miss Emma J. Maris, 
Chicago, 111.; Rev. J. M. Moore, Chi- 
cago; Rev. C. J. Haan, Chicago; Rev. 
James Stickel, Toledo, la. ; Mr. and Mrs. 
A. Householder, Roberts, 111. ; Rev. C. 
De Leeum, Chicago, 111. 

The last session on Friday evening 
was not largely attended. The speakers 
were both present as per program. It 
seemed a great pity that the multitude of 
pastors, anxious for members, as Rev. 
Mr. Dallmann said he was, could not 
have heard. him relate his experience and 
also have heard the address that fol- 
lowed. After the address by Rev. G. A. 
Pegram, President Swartz made a few 
happy remarks and then declared the ses- 
sion ended and the Convention ad- 
journed. 



''The Christian is not left to his own 
guidance as he goes on his pilgrim way 
through the world. Two companions 
are provided for him : the word of God, 
in which he will find help for every dif- 
ficulty and temptation, and the Holy 
Spirit, who will open his mind to under- 
stand what he reads. Thus it is not 
God's plan that we should ever feel for- 
saken ; the feeling is only the result of 
willful neglect of the word and the 
Snirit." 



"When we trust we do not worrv, nor 
are we anxious about the future. Worry 
and anxiety bring fear, and fear has 
torment. It is easy to trust God in the 
sunshine and calm. But the time to 
trust is when you cannot trace, and 
when the storms and trials of life op- 
press on every side." 



FROM IOWA. 

When I first tried to write on the 
lodge question, I was helped by Jona- 
than Blanchard and H. L. Kellogg, both 
of whom are of precious memory to me. 
The Cynosure was then a pioneer pa- 
per. 

Since that time, the cause of secret- 
ism has grown and the truths on the 
secret society question have had their ef- 
fects everywhere. There are even lodge 
men now, who agree with the Cynosure 
and its principles. 

The state superintendent of the pub- 
lic schools of Iowa, who is now serving 
his third term, is in line with the facts 
on the secret society question. 

Senator J. P. Dolliver, a noble states- 
man of Iowa, is also at the front. In 
a recent speech made by him, he said : 
"The young men of this state have an 
incalculable interest in putting the quar- 
rels and conventions of the last few years 
behind them. We ought to train up a 
generation of independent thinkers in 
Iowa politics. We need no programs 
issuing for our approval out of secret 
conclaves. We do- not desire to have 
the offices which ought to dignify our 
public life made the subjects of traffic, 
and barter, and private negotiations run- 
ning over a term of years. The time 
has come to deliver the state from these 
evil tendencies." 

It is seen that secret societies are more 
capable of being used for bad and cor- 
rupt purposes, than other organizations, 
and designing men take advantage of the 
opportunity and make it disgusting to 
good men in the lodge. Honest lodge 
men believe that the lodge should be 
abandoned, and that it would have been 
better if the lodge had never existed. 

Cyrus Smith. 

Leon, Iowa, June 8, 1909. 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



69 




DEAN JOHN 0. REED, 
University of Michigan. 



Dean Reed of the University of Mich- 
igan gave an able address at the Conven- 
tion on June 3d, and we expected to give 
it to the readers of the Cynosure, but 
Mr. Reed writes requesting us not to 
print it as it is a part of a series of ar- 
ticles that he is preparing for one of the 
prominent magazines. He does not oc- 
cupy the position of the Cynosure re- 
specting secret societies. Prof. Reed 
thinks that the evil of college fraterni- 
ties can be eliminated. He is for re- 



forming them without making them 
open societies. For his criticisms, how- 
ever mild, he is already feeling the fangs 



of the 



lodge. 



The Chicagfo Tribune 



''wilfully neglected" to publish the cor- 
rections sent to the editor, though he had 
published statements accredited to Mr. 
Reed which he had never uttered. 



We may know each other's deeds, but 
we cannot know each other's hearts. 



70 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT. 
National Christian Association. 

From May 1, 1908, to April 30, 1909. 

RESOURCES. 

Real estate — • 

Carpenter Building $15,000.00 

Kansas land 1,000.00 

Minnesota lots . . . • • • • • 103.83 

Bills receivable (annuity 

funds) 5,201.50 

Merchandise on hand — coal, 

etc 65.00 

Subscriptions due on Cynosure 60.53 

Cynosure inventory 2,000.00 

Books in stock 1,269.49 

W. II. Fischer, Trustee 9,500.00 

Fixtures 381.15 

Publishing material 802.31 

Reference library 296.95 

Tracts in stock 374-62 

Dawson farm interest. ...... 5,000.00 

Suspense account 1,350.00 

Taqua land contract 120.00 

Personal accounts due 81.20 



$42,606.58 
Cash on hand May i, 1900 . 354-20 

$42,960.78 

LIABILITIES. 

Annuities — 

Capwell $ 24.00 

Johnson 100.00 

Ohio 1 ,000.00 

New York 1,200.00 

Michigan 300.00 

Woodward 50.00 

Smith ' ■ 200.00 

Amick 500.00 

Sunday funds — 

Ohio $ 1,160.00 

Pennsylvania 100.00 

Theological Seminaries 8.09 

Personal accounts payable . . . 260.48 
Cynosure subscriptions paid 

in advance 944.02 

Capital account ( Carpenter 

Building, pub. material, 

etc.) 37,114.19 

$42,960.78 



LOSS AND GAIN. 

For the Year 1908-1909. 

LOSSES. 

Expenses : Attorney's fees, 

fuel, etc $ 313.32 

Appropriation for distribution 

literature 207.74 

Appropriation for distribution 

of tracts 108.48 

Appropriation for distribution 

conventions 327.14 

Annuities paid 98.00 

Postage 269.36 

Agents' traveling expenses. . 123.20 

Personal accounts i.oo 

Fixtures 36.50 

Salaries of agents — PhilHps, 

Stoddard, Randle, Davidson 

and Pegram 3,0152.81 

:..: , $4,537-55 

GAINS.' .-4% 

Interest .$ 836.51 

Carpenter Building 610.5S 

Contributions 1,617.53 

Cynosure 559-73 

Kansas real estate 3.79 

$3,628.14 
Net loss, as per ledger, page 

270 .,....$ 909.41 

$ 4.537-55 

National Christian Association. 

1908, May I, N. C. A. capital 
account ••••_• -$38,023.60 

1909, April 30, net loss 909.41 

$37,11419 

Let every new sight of your wicked 
heart, and every new wave of trouble, 
drive your soul to hide in Him, the rock 
of your salvation. There is no true 
peace but in a present hold of the Lord 
our Righteousness. — McCheyne. 

The peace of God is said to garrison 
the believer's heart and mind. He is 
surrounded with such blessed privileges 
that he is as safe as one" in an impreg- 
nable castle. — Garnall. 



Jealousy is simply another name for 
self-love. — Sel. 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



71 




WILLIAM DALLMANN. 



WHAT IS FREEMASONRY? 

Rev. William Dallman of Milwaukee, 
Wis., president of the English Lutheran 
Synod, spoke as follov/s : 

Mr. Chairman and Friends : Manv 

years ago a company of Lntiieran min- 
isters were invited by the National 
Christian Association to listen to a lec- 
ture by Mr. Edward Ronayne, and I, a 
school boy, Vv^as there to hear and see. 
Not being one of McCauUey's typical 
school boys, I did not know very much 
what it was all about, but I do remem- 
ber the great impression created by Mr. 
Ronayne upon those Lutheran ministers. 
Twenty-one years ago I was asked to 



start the first English Lutheran City 
Mission within the bounds of a large 
Sunday school conference. I was asked 
to take charge of that mission. 

I had, when I began there, seven 
young men. We worsniped on the thir^ 
floor, over a livery stable. Now aside 
from any high motives as a missionary, 
but simply as a business proposition, it 
wi]] appeal to you when I tell you that I 
\^'anted members knd I wanted them bad- 
ly. A very fine young man and his wife 
and little girl wanted to join my church. 
I said to the man, **You cannot." "Why 
not?" "Why, because you are a Free 
Mason ; it is not in accord with the 
Bible." "Are you a Free Mason?" he 



72 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



asked. "No." "Then you "know noth- 
ing about it.'' 

I admitted the soft impeachment that I 
did not know much about it. I had heard 
so from my teachers and professors; it 
was the rule of my church and that is 
all I did know about it. I admitted it, 
but I said, I will know more about it. 
"No, you cannot,'' he said. "Well, I will 
try." I wrote a letter and addressed it 
and was just about to send it to the 
Christian Cynosure, 221 West Madi- 
son street, Chicago, 111., for information, 
but just before I dropped it into the mail 
box I said, "No, those people may be 
prejudiced ; I know they are fighting the 
Masonic institution and other secret so- 
cieties, and while they might not'^'Jiist be 
willing to state the false, they may pos- 
sibly suppress the true. (There is a way 
of getting a certain impression by put- 
ting on your lights and your shades.) 
No, thought I, I will not send the letter. 
I will go for my information to a Ma- 
sonic source. 

From a Masonic friend I found that 
Albert G. Mackey; M. D., Past General 
Grand High Priest, etc., etc., was con- 
sidered a standard authority on Mason- 
ry. As they put it, anything that Mack- 
ey says goes. I went to the Enoch Pratt 
library and got Macke3^'s Lexicon of and 
Mackey's Encyclopedia of Freemasonry 
and to these two large books I devoted 
myself for days and nights. I went 
through these two books conscientiously 
for the purpose of breaking down that 
barrier raised by my church against Ma- 
sons and other secret societies. 

I told you that I wanted members and 
wanted them badly, and I thought per- 
haps the old fathers had been too strict 
in enforcing such rules. Here was a 
fine young man seeking to join my 
church, and I could not see for the life 
of me why I could not take him into my 
church, and others like him. You well 
know when a man will leave a large and 
fashionable church and will say he is 
willing to ^o with seven young men onto 
the third floor, over a livery stable, that 
^here must be some interest and some 
^mcerity about him. So I thought; so I 
felt; and it hurt me very much person- 
ally that I could not take into my church 
this young man — a friend of mine. T 



felt this also — they told me so. "If you 
will take in these people you will become 
popular, you will become prosperous. If 
3^ou do not, you will have an uphill fight 
all the days of your life." I realized 
that. I realized the truth of that fully^ 
and so I went through ; these Masonic 
books to see if I could ilot find a loop- 
hole to break through the barrier raised 
by our church. And with that intention, 
in view, I looked through these books 
carefully and now I wajit to give you 
the result of mv studies, and what I 
found, simply as a matter of principle. 
I am not saying a word against an in- 
dividual Mason. Not prejudice, but 
principle shall be the guiding star. 

Albert G. Mackey, M. D., has been 
Past General Grand High Priest and 
Secretary-General of the Supreme Coun- 
cil 33d for the southern jurisdiction of 
the U. S. I shall quote from his Lexi- 
con, fourteenth edition, published by 
Moss & Co., Philadelphia, and from his 
Encyclopedia, on which he worked ten 
years, the result of more than thirty 
years' study anc^ research, published also 
by Moss & Co., 432 Chestnut street, Phil- 
adelphia, 1879. I shall go according to 
Mackey, and quote no others, so as to 
make m.atters simple. Mackey is a rec- 
ognized standard authority among Free- 
masons. 

What Is the Age of Freemasonry? 

"Anderson traces Masonry only to Adam 
in the garden of Eden." 

Preston: "From the commencenrient of 
the world Vv-e may trace the foundation of 
Masonry." 

Oliver proclaims: "That our science ex- 
ip.led before the creation of the globe, and 
was diffused amidst the numerous systema 
with which the grand empyreum of univer- 
sal f-pace is furnished." 

"Now, all this is to write romance, not 
history. . . . The reader . . . either aban- 
dons in disgust a study which has been 
treated with so much folly, or he is led to 
adopt theories, which . . . are absurd." En- 
cyclopedia, p. 297. On page 296 Mackey ad- 
mits that what we mean by Freemasonry 
had its beginning "in the beginning of the 
eighteenth century." 

Brockhaus' Lexicon says: "Specula- 
tive Freemasonry began in the Apple 
Tree Tavern, Convent Garden, London, 
in 1 717. Its founders Vv^ere Anderson 



July, 1909. 



CHKlSTIAxN CYNUSUUK. 



73 



and Desaguliers ; its lirsl Grand Master, 
Anton Sayer. Anderson prepared the 
constitution and submitted it Dec. 27, 
1721 ; in 1723 it was printed." 

Is Freemasonry Despotic? 

*'We find that the Master's authority in 
the lodge is despotic as the sun in the firma- 
ment. . . . This spirit of obedience runs 
through the whole system, and constitutes 
one of the greatest safeguards of our insti- 
tution. The Mason is obedient to the Mas- 
ter; the Master and the lodge to the Grand 
Lodge; and this, in its turn, to the old land- 
marks and ancient regulations of the order " 
•p. 333 Lexicon. 

"Freemasonry more resembles a military 

than a political organization. The order 

must at once be obeyed; its character and 

its consequences may be matters of subse- 

•iiuent inquiry. 

"The Masonic rule of obedience is like the 
nautical imperative: 'Obey orders, even if 
you break owners.' " Encyclopedia, p. 541. 

But Christ says, Matt. 23 :8, 10, Neith- 
er be ye called masters; for one is your 
Master, even Clirist, and all ye are 
brethren. 

No Christian has a right to put him- 
.self under such absolute authority and 
thus surrender his freedom and thus be- 
dcome a "Grand Master's" grand slave. 

Does Freemasonry Require an Oath? 

Dr. Harris says: "What the ignorant call 
'the oath,' is simply an obligation, covenant, 
and promise." Encyclopedia, p. 539. 

On page 5^11 is the "Tiler's Oath." 
"I, A. B., do hereby and hereon solemnly 
and sincerely swear," etc. 

In spite of its denial, then, Masonry 
has an oath. 

To what does the applicant swear? 
He does not knozv. An oath is a most 
solemn thing, and it is utterly wrong to 
swear an oath in such uncertain matters, 
in which a man does not know what he 
is about to swear to. 

AgTiin, the oath is altogether needless, 
in vain. But God's commandment says: 
"Thou shalt not take the name of the 
Lord thy God in vain." Of such need- 
less oaths Christ savs, "Swear not at 
-all." Matt. 5:34. 

Is Freemasonry a Religion? 
"Masonry is a 'religious institution,' its 
-ceremonies are 'part of a really religious 
-wordiip.' " Encyc-lopedia, p. 60. 

"Masonry is, in every sense of the word. 



except one, and that its least philosophical, 
an eminently religious institution — that it 
is indebted solely to the religious element 
which it contains for its origin and for its 
continued existence, and that without this 
religious element it would scarcely be 
worthy of cultivation by the wise and good." 
Encyclopedia, p. 640. 

"Inculcating religious doctrine, command- 
ing religious observance, and teaching relig- 
ious truth, and who can deny that it is em- 
inently a religious institution?" Encyclo- 
pedia, p. 641. 

"Freemasonry is a religious institution, 
and hence its regulations inculcate the use 
of prayer as a proper tribute of gratitude to 
the beneficent Author of Life!" Encyclope- 
dia, p. 594. 

Is Freemasonry the Christian Religion? 

"Freemasonry is not Christianity, nor a 
substitute for it. It does not meddle with 
sectarian creeds or doctrines, but teaches 
fundamental religious truth. 

"The religion of Masonry is not sectarian. 
It admits men of every creed within its hos- 
pitable bosom. 

"It is not Judaism, though there is noth- 
ing in it to offend a Jew; it is not Christian- 
ity, tut there is nothing in it repugnant to 
the laith of a Christian." Encyclopedia, p. 
641. 

"Hutchison and Oliver have, I am con- 
strained to believe, fallen into a great error 
in calling the Master Mason's degree a Chris- 
tian institution. ... If Masonry were sim- 
ply a Christian institution, the Jew and the 
Moslem, the Brahman and the Buddhist, 
could not conscientiously partake of its il- 
lumination. But its universality is its boast. 
In its language citizens of every nation may 
converse; at its altar men of all religions 
may kneel; to its creed disciples of every 
faith may subscribe." Encyclopedia, p. 162. 

Freemasonry being a religion, and 
not being the Christian religion, is a 
false religion, therefore no Christian can 
join it, and every Christian must leave it. 

On page 595 two prayers are given, 
one lor opening and the other for clos- 
mg the lodge ; both are Christless, of 
course. The jew, tlie Mohammedan, the 
Brahman, the Buddhist do not believe in 
Christ, do not pray to llim, and hence 
the Mason may not pray to Christ, so as 
not to offend the enemies of Christ. 
Christ is purposely excluded, not con- 
fessed and hence denied, "\^^losoever 
denicth the Son, the same hath not the 
Father." i John 2.2^^. 



74 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



What Is the Religion of Freemasonry? 

"Its religion is that general one of na- 
ture." Encyclopedia, p. 641. . 

The religion of nature ! So the Word 
of God is ignored; the Savior and the 
salvation lie won for us by His suffer- 
ing, death and resurrection is ignored or 
rejected. 

Does Freemasonry Accept the Bible as 
God's Word? 

"In 1856 the Grand Lodge of Ohio de- 
clared 'that a distinct avowal of a belief in 
the divine authority of the Holy Scriptures 
should be required of every one who is ad- 
mitted to the privileges of Masonry, and that 
a denial of the same is an offense against 
the Institution, calling for exemplary dis- 
cipline.' It is hardly necessary to say that 
the enunciation of this principle met with 
the almost universal condemnation of the 
Grand Lodges and Masonic jurists of this 
country. The general sense of the Fraterni- 
ty has rejected all religious tests except a 
belief in God." Encyclopedia, p. 97. 

To acknowledge the Bible as God's 
Word was almost universally condemn- 
ed by Freemasonry. But Christ says : 
"Search the Scriptures; for in them ye 
think ye have eternal life ; and they are 
they which testify of Me." John 5 139. 
How Does Freemasonry Use the Bible? 

"The Bible is used among Masons as the 
symbol of the will of God, however it may be 
expressed. And, therefore, whatever to any 
people expresses that will may be used as a 
substitute for the Bible in a Masonic lodge. 
Thus, in a Lodge consisting entirely of Jews, 
the Old Testament alone may be placed upon 
the altar, and Turkish Masons make use of 
the Koran. Whether it be the Gospels to 
the Christian, the Pentateuch to the Israel- 
ite, the Koran to the Mussulman, or the 
Vedas to the Brahman, it everywhere Ma- 
sonically conveys the same idea — that of the 
symbolism of the Divine Will revealed to 
man." Encyclopedia, p. 114. 

Among Freemasons the Bible is not 
regarded as God's Will, but only as a 
symbol of God's Will. But according 
to the Bible, the Bible is God's Word, 
given "by inspiration of God." 2 Tim. 
3:16. "Holy men of God spoke as they 
were moved by the Holy Ghost." 2 
Peter i : 19-21. 

Among Freemasons the Bible is put 
upon the same level with the Koran of 
the Mohammedans, and the Vedas of 
the Brahmans. 



What Is the Creed of Freemasonry? 

"This creed consists of two articles: First,, 
a belief in God, the Creator of all things,, 
who is therefore recognized as the Grand 
Architect of the Universe; and secondly, a 
belief in the eternal life, to which this pres- 
ent life is but a preparatory and probation- 
ary state. ... 

"In ancient times. Masons were charged 
in every country to be of the religion of 
that country or nation, whatever it was; yet 
it is now thought to be more expedient only 
to oblige them to that religion in which all 
men agree, leaving their particular opinion 
to themselves. 

"This is now considered universally as 
the recognized law on the subject." Ency- 
clopedia, p. 192. 

Here we see again that Freemasonry 
does not worship the true God, Father, 
Son and Holy Ghost; we see again that 
Christ and His blessed work of salvation 
is wholly ignored; we see that the re- 
ligion of the Bible is treated as a "par- 
ticular opinion," which one may have or 
not have just as he pleases ; we see 
Christianity is put on the same level with; 
Judaism, Mohammedanism, Buddhism,, 
Brahmanism, etc. 

Are the Ten Commandments Binding on 
the Mason? 

"The ten commandments are not oblig- 
atory upon a Mason as a Mason, because the 
Institution is tolerant and cosmopolite, and 
cannot require its members to give their ad- 
hesion to any religious dogmas or precepts, 
excepting those which express a belief in the 
existence of God, and the immortality of 
the soul. No partial law prescribed for a 
particular religion can be properly select- 
ed for the government of an Institution 
whose great characteristic is its universali- 
ty." Encyclopedia, p. 205. 

Freemasonry regards the Ten Com- 
mandments as a "partial law prescribed 
for a particular religion." Freemasonry 
is more "tolerant" than God's Ten Com- 
mandments. This is wrong. God wants 
the Ten Commandments tO' be binding 
upon all men. 

What Is the Object of Freemasonry? 

"It is neither charity nor almsgiving, nor 
the cultivation of the social sentiment; for 
both of these are merely incidental to its 
organization; but it is the search after truth 
and that truth is the unity of God and the 
immorality of the soul." Encyclopedia, p. 
217. 

"The real object of Freemasonry, in a phil- 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



75 



osophical and religious sense, is the search 
for truth, . . . that which is properly ex- 
pressed to a knowledge of God." Encyclo- 
pedia, p. 834. 

If ''truth" is the object of Masonry it 
is on a wild goose chase, for there is no 
"truth" — rehgious truth, saving truth — 
but in the Bible. To find the truth, 
Christ bids us search the Scriptures, not 
join the Freemasons. 

Does Masonry Teach Salvation by 
Works? 

"The definitions of Freemasonry, says Oli- 
ver, in his Historical Landmarks of Free- 
masonry, have been numerous; but they ail 
unite in declaring it to be a system of moral- 
ity, by the practice of which its members 
may advance their spiritual interest, and 
mount by the theological ladder from the 
Lodge on earth to the Lodge in heaven." 
Encyclopedia, p. 210. 

"It inculcates the practice of virtue, but it 
supplies no scheme of redemption for sin. 
It points its disciples to the path of right- 
eousness, but it does not claim to be 'the 
way, the truth and the life.' " Encyclopedia, 
p. 641. 

"It is the object of the speculative Mason, 
by a uniform tenor of virtuous conduct, to 
receive, when his allotted course of life has 
passed, the inappreciable reward, from his 
Celestial Master, of 'Well done, thou good 
and faithful servant.' " p. 450, 451, Lexicon. 

PVeemasonry teaches salvation by 
works ; the Bible says : We conclude 
that a man is justified by faith, without 
the deeds of the law. Rom. 3 128. 

By grace are ye saved, through faith; 
and that not of yourselves ; it is the gift 
of God; not of works, lest any man 
should boast. Eph. 2 :8. 

Freemasonry does not claim to be 
^'the way, the truth, and the life." 

But Christ does ; He says : ''I am the 
way, the truth and the life ; no man 
cometh to the Father, but by Me." John 
14:6. 

Conclusion. 

Now% what is Freemasonry, according 
to its own description in the standard 
works of Mackey? 
Freemasonry is laughable in its claim to 

antiquity, put forth by many of its 

writers ; 
Freemasonry is a despotic organization, 

demanding the blind obedience of its 

members ; 
Freemasonry is a religious organization, 



teaching the ''universal religion," 
treating Christianity as a "sect" and 
placing it on the same level with Juda- 
ism, Mohammedanism, Brahmanism 
and heathenism ; 
Freemasonry teaches the belief in the 
''Great Architect of the Universe," 
and ignores the Holy Trinity, Father, 
Son and Floly Ghost; 
Freemasonry ignores the Bible as God's 
Word and places it on the same level 
w^ith the Koran of the Turks and the 
Vedas of the Hindoo ; 
Freemasonry excludes Christ from its 

prayers and thus practices idolatry; 
Freemasonry denies the gospel plan of 
salvation by faith in Christ and 
teaches salvation by man's good works 
without the work of Jesus Christ for 
us. 

Such is Freemasonry, judged from its 
own publications. Such being the case, 
what does the voice of God say of it? 

Be ye not unequally yoked together 
witli unbelievers; for what fellowship 
hath righteousness with unrighteous- 
ness? . . . Wherefore come out 
from, among them, and be ye separate, 
saith the Lord, and touch not the un- 
clean thing; and I will receive you, and 
will be a Father unto you, and ye shall 
be My sons and daughters, saith the 
Lord Almighty. 2 Cor. 6:14 — 18. 



REPORT OF AUDITORS. 

To the National Christian Association : 

The undersigned. Auditors of the Na- 
tional Christian Association, have exam- 
ined the books of your Treasurer, W. 
L Phillips, up to April 30, 1909, inclu- 
sive, and find that they are correctly 
kept, and that there are vouchers for all 
expenditures. We also find that securi- 
ties are on hand, as stated in the an- 
nual report of the Treasurer. 

W^e have also examined the report 
of Wm. H. Fischer, Trustee of Annuity 
Fund, and find the same to be correct 
and in accordance with the books of the 
Treasurer. J. P. Shaw, 

H. F. Kletzing, 
Auditors. 



No preacher can live by critici'sm 
alone. 



76 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



CHAIRMAN INTRODUCES NEXT 
SPEAKER. 

Rev. S. H. Swartz — Now I know you 
will be happy and delighted to listen 
to our friend and brother, true and tried, 
President Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege. 1 have heard him a good many 
times, but he always delights me and 
warms my heart and sends me away 
from the platform ashamed that I should 
stand on the same platform with him. 
He is the one man that makes me feel 
my insignificance, my brother and yours, 
President Blanchard. 



President C. A. Blanchard — P do not 
know that I will allow Brother Swartz 
to introduce me any more if he talks 
that way. It is rather hard when he 
says he is ashamed to appear on the 
same platform with me. 

A FEW COMMENTS. 

Just a moment, brothers and sisters, 
if I may call your attention to one or 
two things in this most remarkable and 
admirable address to which we have lis- 
tened. 

Notice in the first place that all the 
advantages which Dr. Reed says are pos- 
sible to the fraternities are also possible 
to open fraternal association. 

Since the world was made, I judge 
there has been no question in regard to 
those advantages. As long ago as Solo- 
mon's time the world knew that two 
were better than one, and that a three- 
fold cord was not quickly broken. It 
stands to reason that Oxie hundred men, 
or a dozen men, co-operating can accom- 
plish more good things if they have a 
correct motive than the same numbers 
of persons working independently could. 
We must admit that association is a 
fundamental law of human society in 
order to the accomplishing of large 
things. Dr. Reed has instanced the fra- 
ternities as a place where men may 
bring about good results. There is no 
question about that at all. 

In the second place observe that all 
the evils he mentions as resulting from 
these fraternities are natural results of 
secrecy, while the good results named 
do not involve secrecy as a necessary 
element at all. The good involves asso- 



ciation, companionship, fellowship, but 
there is nothing in secrecy to bring them 
about ; on the other hand, secrecy is 
the natural parent of the evils of which 
he has been speaking. 

The young man mentioned who came 
up from his home and spent a year in 
the university without membership in 
the fraternity, got along well ; when he 
reached his second year and came into 
the fraternity he began to deteriorate 
mentally and morally. There is no 
policeman in the world who does not 
know that the time when men commit 
crimes and when vice prevails is the 
time of darkness. The evils that the 
police in this city are constantly endeav- 
oring to keep under are directly the evils 
of the night. Secrecy is the natural 
parent of evtl. Now that is not saying 
that every person who is in a secret so- 
ciety is a bad person, nor is it saying 
that every secret society has a bad pur- 
pose, as its professed object, nor even 
as its real design, but it is calling at- 
tention to the ordinary experience of 
human nature. You know every one of 
you that Dr. Crosby of New York Uni- 
versity was right when he said years 
ago, "Out of the darkness dark deeds 
grow." 

One of our speakers said this after- 
noon that he thought perhaps it was a 
mistake to pivot our movement so large- 
ly on the fact of secrecy. He preferred 
we should swing over to the authority 
and personal work of the Lord Jesus 
Christ. I quite agree with him as to 
the latter matter, that the relation of 
the secret society movement to the per- 
son and work of Jesus Christ is the 
fundamental thing, but I call your at- 
tention to this fact : Secret societies nat- 
urally occupy a position of hostility to 
Jesus Christ, and since this is true, it 
is not by accident nor by error that our 
work is very largely pivoted on the mat- 
ter of secrecy. The Lord Jesus Christ 
did all things openly and told His dis- 
ciples to do the same. He said the word 
3-0U hear even in private conversation 
from Me, preach from the house-tops. He 
explained that men love darkness rather 
than light because their deeds are evil. 
He said that men who did things that 
were right loved the light, and came 



July, 1S09. 



CllKlSTlAiN CYNOSURE. 



77 



to it. The moment you plan a move- 
ment of a secret sort you are planning* 
it without Jesus and as certain as seeds 
grow to produce their likeness, just so 
surely an organization thus organized 
will work out evil everywhere, as Dr. 
Reed says it does, in the universities. 

Pardon me if I take a single moment 
more on this great address. I wish to 
speak of the proposed ''reform of the 
fraternity?" You are none of you ig- 
norant of the fact that there is a move- 
ment on foot in our country starting 
from the men who make and sell liquor 
for the reformation oi liquor selling. 
There is a feeling among liquor men that 
the liquor traffic has been a law breaker 
and that it must cease to be thus crim- 
inal if it is to live. For this reason 
liquor men all over the country are pro- 
testing against law breaking saloons; not 
because they are particularly interested 
in human society, the history of this 
business does not allow us to lay this 
flattering unction to our souls. We 
would like to believe it if we could, but 
we cannot believe it if we would. We 
know that it is not true. 

The brewers that we have here in this 
city have stayed here and sent their 
noxious fumes up into the sky for years. 
Men who drank their beer and whisky 
have been knocked down, taken to the 
police courts, sent to State's prison for 
murder, or hanged in the city jail here 
for years and years. When did the de- 
sire to improve the liquor business take 
hold of the brewers and distillers? It 
took hold of them when the sales of their 
product began to be cut off and the 
profits of their business began to be dim- 
inished. There is no question here for 
a man who has considered the question ; 
he cannot believe, and he dare not say 
that these men are actuated by the desire 
to do away with the evils of their traffic. 
It is their bank balance that is in trouble. 
They wish to elevate the liquor busi- 
ness, not so men can be bettered, but 
so the liquor business may survive the 
long smoldering, but at last outbreaking 
indigation of an outraged nation. And 
just as the effort to elevate the liquor 
business is not arising from the desire 
on the part of the liquor dealers to com- 
passionate men, who commit crimes, and 



women who suffer sometimes in silence 
and sometimes with shrieks of agony — 
these liquor men are not seeking to help 
these people, they are seeking to help 
themselves — just so the movement to 
elevate the fraternities in our schools has 
not originated, so far as I am able to 
determine, from the desire on the part 
of anyone to make men better, but from 
the desire on the part of the fraternities 
to stave off the day of judgment, which 
they feel in their hearts is coming. It 
does not require a wise man who notes 
the action of State Legislatures, of city 
boards of education and of Circuit and 
Supreme Courts to see the hand writ- 
ing on the wall. The father of frater- 
nities is quick to discern facts which are 
now before our people and he wishes to 
save the fraternity, not to benefit the 
man. I am not speaking of men like 
Dr. Reed, but I am speaking of fraternity 
men, who are seeking to improve fra- 
ternities. W^hy do they wish to improve 
them? Not for the sake of the men, but 
for the sake of themselves. I must feel 
this is true, for if they really wished to 
make their lodges better they would have 
been about it long ago. Not for the 
sake of improving men, but for the sake 
of saving the fraternities in the schools, 
this we must believe to be the object of 
the movement. 

Now a second word on this subject. I 
believe the movement for reformation of 
the liquor trade is doomed to failure ; 
that thing was a law breaker in the 
very beginning, demoralizing to the souls 
of men and the bodies of men, and the 
ruin of their homes. They were talking 
once about improving the beauty of a 
certain dog by cutting oft' his tail, and 
the question arose as to where to cut 
the tail. Some one suggested that a 
good place to begin was just behind his 
ears. That is the necessity as regards 
the liquor business, and as to the secret 
society, such things are never reformed, 
they are killed. Mad dogs are not im- 
proved, they are shot. Slavery was not 
reformed, it died. 

The men and women who are here to- 
night ought to build their plans on these 
truths : secrecy is an evil element in 
human association ; those who are true 
come to the light, that their deeds may 



78 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



be made manifest, and that they are 
wrought in God. Evil always seeks 
secrecy; secrecy is the inevitable mark 
of evil and all secret school associations, 
secondary or collegiate, throughout the 
length and breadth of our country, ought 
to be at once and forever abolished. It 
seems to me we ought to plant ourselves 
on this ground now, and as far as we 
can, win our fellows to this conviction, 
that honest men do not need secret as- 
sociations; that dishonest men are not 
entitled to them for their protection and 
help, and that therefore the associations 
of our schools and colleges ought to be 
free and open to the world. I believe 
this is the conclusion to which the 
thoughtful people of our nation, and of 
every other nation, are to come. 

I feel like closing this portion of the 
remarks I make at this time by congrat- 
ulating you and myself on the privilege 
of listening to Dr. Reed. While I do 
not believe all he seems to believe, and 
while I do not share his faith that secret 
fraternities can be radically changed, I 
do believe that every movement in that 
direction will be a helpful thing and will 
be a part of the great movement which 
v/ill in the end bring the triumph of 
truth in regard to the secret order ques- 
tion. 

Now, Mr. Chairman, I do not propose 
to keep these patient people here a great 
while to-night. While I feel like con- 
gratulating you on the privilege of hear- 
mg Dr. Reed I feel like criticising our 
committee for not giving you a chance 
to hear Dr. George, but he has had to 
go to Pittsburg and you are at my mercy 
for a few moments. 
ALL LODGES PROFESS GOOD ENDS. 

I call your attention in the first place 
to this fact, that there never has been a 
secret society since the world began of 
which any record is found, that has not 
professed good objects as its end and 
purpose. We here in the North thought 
the Ku Klux Clan was a terrible kind 
of sn organization. It was. It marked 
its course by the burning cabins of poor, 
inoffensive negroes and law abiding 
white men. Wherever it went men were 
found dangling from the limbs of trees, 
were taken out of their beds and beaten 
with heavy clubs until their blood and 



mangled flesh were together falling down 
on the ground, and yet the Ku Klux Clan 
when stating its object and purpose said 
"the purpose of this association is to 




C. A. Blanchard. 



perpetuate liberty and to establish firmly 
the government which Washington 
founded." That was the professed ob- 
ject of that secret order. 

It is said that when Napoleon and his 
brothers went through Spain and de- 
stroyed the secret houses, religious 
houses though they were, they found 
the places where little children had been 
thrown, their flesh consumed with quick 
lime, their bones to waste away more 
slowly. It is said that men who had been 
seasoned in blood on hundreds of battle 
fields sat in these so-called religious 
houses and wept like children, yet these 
institutions put the walls about them, put 
the gates up, had an understanding that 
nobody came within these walls who was 
not to be trusted to keep secret what he 
saw and this was the result. They pro- 
fessed religious objects and purposes. 
They said we want this place so that 
religious people can be by themselves 
and have a good, quiet time and grow 
spiritually, and if these same men had 
been in some place where they would 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



79 



have been subject to inspection, they 
would probably have been decent men. 
The}' had a secret order and it worked 
out all nameless iniquities. 

Some of you have heard me repeatedly 
mention the Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians. It exists in this city to-day. Their 
professed object is simply fraternity and 
benevolence. They say, we are a com- 
pany of men gathered together for the 
purpose of assisting and helping one an- 
other. An angel from heaven would not 
be ashamed to have the purpose the An- 
cient Order of Hibernians professes. At 
the same time there was a day in the 
history of our country, not so very long 
ago, when it became necessary, as these 
men believed, to kill a few men, and 
these lodges called themselves the Molly 
Maguires, and they terrorized the whole 
State of Pennsylvania, and it came to 
be so that a man who was known to be 
related to a mining corporation could 
not go about in the State of Pennsyl- 
vania without fear of his life until twen- 
ty-two men, connected with that organi- 
zation, had been hung by the neck until 
they were dead. After the State of 
Pennsylvania had spent tens of thous- 
ands of dollars in finding these men and 
securing sentences on the part of judges 
and juries, and had executed the sen- 
tences by the sheriffs, that saw that they 
could not carry their work any farther, 
and gave it up. 

Then, too, take the Clan na Gael, it 
hasn't a bad name, at least the name was 
not bad until it was stained with blood 
in this particular city. And what did the 
Clan na Gael do? It sent its emissaries 
to the office of a physician to call him 
in haste to relieve the sufferings of a 
man in a part of the city, not very far 
away from where we are now gathered. 
They said there is a man there suffering, 
and that man who was ready to give 
himself for the relief of suffering, leaped 
into the buggy which was bringing him 
to his death. The organization which 
did that work did not profess to be a 
murderous body. The men were never 
sworn to go and entrap physicians on 
the plea of the great need, and lead 
them away to desolate homes for the pur- 
pose of murdering them. The professed 
object was as holy as the object pro- 



fessed by this church in which we meet, 
and if those men were to-night in the 
blessed light of publicity there is no rea- 
son to suppose that the men might not 
live up to the profession which they 
made. 

I might say. on this ground, what I do 
not hesitate to say, that if angels from 
heaven should organize a secret organi- 
zation they would be corrupted by it; 
they vv^ill not do it; those bright beings 
hate darkness and love light. They 
would not form a secret association, and 
no man is good enough to belong to a 
secret society, and no man can be so 
sure of his manhood that he ought not 
to fear personal corruption, if he be- 
comes a member of an organization of 
this kind. 

Allow me to say a word, if I may, in 
regard to the duty of men and women 
of our day. I heard George Bain arise 
and speak of the fact that most evils 
prevail, not because the majority of per- 
sons wish them to remain, but because 
they fear that they could not accomplish 
anything against them. They say we 
cannot accomplish this work. If we 
could, we would, but it is impossible and 
therefore we will not undertake it. As 
a man said to me forty years ago when 
I was moving in this work for the first 
time, ''Man, you are simply running your 
head against a stone wall, the thing never 
can be done." 

In this house to-day. Brother Phillips, 
our Secretary-, showed me a letter receiv- 
ed from a Masonic publication here in 
Chicagq, in which the writer called oui 
attention to the fact that there were three 
times as many Free Masons in the State 
of Illinois reported at the present time 
as there were forty years ago when this 
organization began. He says, 'Tiow do 
you like this result of your organiza- 
tion?" That was the substance of the 
inquiry. 

I suppose there is no intelligent per- 
son who does not sometimes feel tlie 
force of an argument of this kind. I 
do not believe there is a preacher in 
the city of Chicago who does not some- 
times look at his congregation and then 
in imagination stand on the steps of his 
church and see the swirling hosts who go 



80 



CIIKISTIA.N CYNUSUKE. 



July, 1909. 



by and ask himself, how do you Hke the 
results of your efforts? 

When I was a boy we had exactly this 
same argument used to show to us the 
futility of all efforts to do away with 
that tremendous crime, American slav- 
ery, and up to the very time when the 
death blow of slavery was struck this 
argument was used. I think it was in 
1857 that the Dred Scott decision was 
giyen — a decision given by a Chief Jus- 
lice of the United States, which declared 
that a black man had "no rights"^ which 
-cL man who was white was bound to re- 
spect. In 1857, I think this same Chief 
Justice, who gave that decision, went to 
Missouri to administer on the estate oi 
his brother, and there sold the children 
of his ovv^n brother, his brother's life 
blood, on the same block with horses 
and cattle, household goods and farming 
implements. In 1859 John Brown was 
hung. It was in 1858 that Abraham 
Lincoln said it would take two hundred 
years to work out the problem of Ameri- 
-can slavery. He said v/hen Douglas, 
taunted him with desiring to turn loose 
a horde of black savages to burn and de- 
stroy: We do not propose immediate 
emancipation, it will take two hundred 
years to wind up slavery. W^endell Phd- 
hps, and certainly no man is here to- 
night to charge him with infidelity to 
the slave, said it would take one hun- 
dred years. Harriet Beecher Stowe 
said she did not expect to see the end 
of slavery ; she did not expect her child 
to see the end of slavery, but she hoped 
her grandchild might possibly live to 
see the end of slavery; and yet in five 
years after Lincoln had said it would 
take two hundred years he wrote the 
doom of that cursed institution with his 
own right hand. In less than ten years 
after Harriet Beecher Stowe and Wen- 
dell Phillips were saying that it would 
take one hundred years to destroy Ameri- 
can slavery it had gone, and to-day chil- 
dren have to learn from books, not from 
the sight of their eyes, that there was 
ever such an institution tolerated under 
the fair skies of this beautiful, land, 
which God has given us for our home. 
How was this brought about? By just 
such meetings as this. Lincoln was a 
member of the State Legislature in 



Springfield, and he was to make a speech 
against slavery. There were three peo- 
ple there, one his friend, who was to be 
chairman, and one old man. Lincoln 
said ; "1 knew I was to be here, because 
I was to speak, and I knew you were 
to be here, because you were to intro- 
duce me; but how are we to account for 
this other fellow?" At that time when 
he vvith others were telling of the awful 
nature of this system, and humble men 
were printing papers, little papers, that 
found it hard to live, papers that were 
despised by the great papers of the day 
that knew how ''to crook the pliant 
hinges of the knee, v/|iere thrift might 
follow fawning" — humble men despised 
by the great ones of earth, because they 
did not have the wisdom to set the sail 
just right to catch the popular breeze, 
and yet these humble men in public life, 
these humble men starting papers, these 
were the men that wrought out the pop- 
ular sentiment which sent hundreds of 
thousands of men across the land sing- 
ii^g"? ''John Brown's body lies mouldering 
in the ground, but his soul goes march- 
ing on." 

I stood at the corner of Michigan and 
Jackson boulevards last Monday and 
saw those thousands of men, gray hair- 
ed, uniformed in blue, as they used to 
be, and the khaki clothed boys behind 
tliem, marching down that magnificent 
boulevard, and I said, is it not a marvel 
that these men enlisted in the Army of 
the Republic, enlisted not knowing what 
they were called to work out and yet 
under God these men were the men to 
execute judgment against that crime 
against men and Almighty God. 

I want to say to you, men and women, 
to-morrow morning we will be gathered, 
notverymany; to-morrow afternoon there 
will be more of us, not very many; and 
to-morrow night we shall have the priv- 
ilege of listening to a man, a preacher 
in a great church, and yet we shall never 
be, while this convention is in progress, 
a great company of persons, a few hun- 
dreds at the most, and at the same time 
God Himself that looks down from heav- 
en and that loves light and hates dark- 
ness, and that loves to see fair skinned, 
fair eyed young men and that hates to 
see these men with their skins purpled 



July, 1909. 



CliiilSTlAN CYNOSURE. 



81 



and mottled by the liquor traffic and 
their eyes dimmed, that same God who 
loves these people., these children that 
are drifting up and down our streets — 
that same God who is in favor of right- 
•ecusness, is to be with us to-morrow, 
as He IS here to-night, and so also is 
Ilis Spirit who is leading those that do 
His bidding. 

Sometimes I wish I knew how many 
there were in the Heavenly hosts. i\fter 
the Holy Spirit says a million, He says 
thousands of thousands. I do not know 
how many thousands of thousands are, 
but among those men who were like 
ourselves, who are redeemed by the 
precious blood of Christ from the guilt 
of sin, kept by the power of the Holy 
Gliost day by day, we also shall have a 
place. It will be a great company of 
men of all nations and kindreds and 
peoples and tongues. There are thous- 
ands, yes , tens of thousands o£ wives 
that will wait to-night for footsteps that 
tliey will , not hear, and children who 
will say, '^Mamma, when will papa 
■come?" wiho will not see their papas 
come, and! those hearts also are with us 
in this great struggle against evil, and 
just as sure as God continues to sit upon 
His throne, just as sure as righteous- 
ness is to prevail, secret societies are 
to go, where slavery has gone, where the 
liquor shop is going, where every evil 
is to go when the Lord Jesus Christ 
comes. 

Gladstone closed one of his great 
speeches with a remark like this : "Gen- 
tlemen, the House will divide and we 
shall be defeated. We are ^oing into 
lobby a defeated party, but time is on 
our side and when the thing goes on, 
and all is said and done that has to be 
done and said, the principles for which 
tlie minority stands to-night, ar^ the 
principles which are to prevail." So it 
shall be with us here to-night; we will 
help on the great victory. We will be 
partners in the struggle for eternal 
righteousness. W^e shall at last see the 
struggle end in triumph of the truth. 
Time is on our side. 



Mr. Swartz — I want the privilege of 
congratulating you upon hearing my 
Brother Blanchard. I think you found 



out what I meant when I said I was 
ashamed to be on the same platform 
with hmi, unless I could get my little 
whistle in first. God bless you, Brother 
Blanchard, and grant that your life may 
long be spared to sound the call to God's 
people, to brmg them to the front and 
to the fight. This is a fight. It is on. 
Some of us have been in it a little while, 
some of us have been in it longer. Some 
of us have come in close touch with the 
grand old saints that represented the 
foundation of this association and start- 
ed It on its mission, and we learned to 
love them as we sat at their feet and 
were taught of them. I could not help 
,but think of them to-night when my 
brother was talking. It seemed to me I 
could catch a glimpse of the dear old 
face of Jonathan Blanchard, his father, 
as he looked over the battlements down 
upon this company. I could not help 
birt somehow see the refiected image of 
that dear man. Brother Stoddard, v»^hom 
we laid away to sleep m Wheaton a few 
months ago in the bright sunshine of a 
winter day, and another and another and 
another that has gone before. I am glad 
that they have found those of us whom 
they started out on the work loyal and 
faithful and true in holding up the colors 
of our cause. We stand shoulder to 
shoulder and foot to foot no matter what 
comes of oppression, misunderstanding, 
or Vvhat comes of disappointment as to 
worldly wealth and prospects, here we 
stand on the ground on which they stood 
years ago. We can do no other. 



God loves to be importuned by souls 
that are sincere. 



Beware of any one who neither fears 
God nor regards man. 



It is not always easy to right a wrong ; 
but it is alwavs noble to trv. 



Application is the water on the wheel 
that sets the machinery a-going. 



No one should be satisfied with a 
glimpse of Christ; every child of God 
should pray, 'T beseech tlie, show me 
thy glory." 



82 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 




SAMUEL H. SWARTZ. 
President W. C. A. ^ 



PERSONAL WORD. 

One does not succeed a man like Pres- 
ident Charles A. Blanchard. The most 
one can hope to do is to follow him more 
or less closely, and to make up for lack 
of genius by emulation of his spirit and 
consecration. He came to just eminence 
in his work chiefly by reason of the se- 
rious temper in which he took his re- 
sponsibility. He sought in his own way 
and in the exercise of his peculiar gift's, 
to furnish for those who looked to his 
leadership a right understanding of the 



issues and the Christian way of dealing 
with them. In loyalty to that ideal, with 
which he is in perfect sympathy, your 
newly elected President will continue the 
policy of' his predecessor. If he may not 
bring the brilliant versatility, or the im- 
pressive- intensity of President C. A. 
Blanchard, he can at least vie with him 
in single-hearted devotfon to the work 
of establishing the supremacy of the 
Kingdom of God upon earth. It would 
be the merest affectation to withhold an 
expression of has sense of the ho^nor con- 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



83 



ferred upon him by an election to this 
position, in accepting which, he feels 
himself pledged to the utmost endeavor, 
that the confidence of those who were 
responsible for the choice shall not be 
disappointed. Brethren, don't forget to 
make mention of me in your prayers; 
that God may use me for His glory in 
the saving of men from the empire of 
organized secrecy. 

Your President, 

Samuel H. Swartz. 
Seneca, Illinois. 



tbttortal. 



The Rev. J. T. Logan, editor of the 
Free Methodist, is greatly bereaved by 
the death of his wife, Mrs. Sylva B. 
Logan, at the home of her mother in 
Alientown, Pa., May 29th. Brother 
Logan has our tenderest sympathy, as 
we know he will also have that of our 
readers. 



DEATH OF MRS. HILLS. 

Mrs. L. G. B. Plills died at her home 
t>n West Lorain street Monday, May 
17th, aged ninety-one years. 

Mrs. Hills came to Oberlin in the 
early days, graduating in 1846. Her 
maiden name was Laura Branch, and 
her birthplace and early home in Ver- 
mont. 

Her husband dying after a brief 
married life, she returned to Oberlin 
and made her home with her sister's 
family, Rev. and Mrs. George Clark, 
where she has resided all these years. 



LODGE SYMPATHY FOR CRIMINAL. 

Cornelius Shea has often been called 
on for speeches at meetings of the 
Teamsters' Union, where he has re- 
sponded with acceptable volubility. 
Formerly president of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, he has of 
late been secretary of a district council 
of the same secret order. For many 
years he has been a conspicuous strike 
leader, having come into prominence 
several years ago when he led a team- 
sters' strike in Chicago. Wherever he 
has been prominent in a labor disturb- 
ance, violence has been a feature of it. 



When the recent strike of teamsters 
began along the water front of 
New York, Shea came and with- 
out delay took command. He was 
warned that no Chicago methods 
of intimidation would be tolerated; 
but soon after his arrival egg- 
shells loaded with vitriol were thrown 
at non-union drivers, just as they had 
been in Chicago. Inspector McCafferty 
forthwith summoned Brother Shea to 
headquarters, and said to him : *'We 
know your record here. We know you 
were indicted twice for assault in Chi- 
cago. We know that vitriol throwing 
has followed your taking charge of 
strikes; but that sort of thing won't do 
in this town, and if we get you it will 
mean your finish." 

This lodge man was born in South 
Boston, Mass., and as a boy he spent al- 
most a year in the Concord reformatory. 
For several years he has had a wife and 
children in Boston, with whom he did 
not live. Five years ago he met Alice 
Walsh in Buffalo, when conducting a 
strike there. She is said to be a strik- 
ing brunette, now 24 years old; she 
must have been about 19 when their ac- 
quaintance began. . She came with him 
to New York, and it is said that he 
found some way to put off marrying her, 
when she repeatedly plead with him. She 
continued to live with him after he re- 
turned from Boston, where he went two 
years ago. At that time he was sen- 
tenced to six months in the house of 
correction upon complaint of his wife for 
adbandonment and non-support. The 
case, which he appealed, was dropped ; 
he came back to New York, and Alice 
Walsh is supposed to have known noth- 
ing about it when she resumed living 
with him. 

Not long ago, Shea's wife proposed in 
a letter to overlook the past, bring the 
children, and begin life over with him. 
Shea is said to have told Alice about his 
wife, and to have received her promise 
to go away. Probably she did leave him 
for a little while. It was, however, a 
close place for a man who seems to have 
had a wife who had never known about 
the other woman, and a woman with 
whom he had lived several years, who 
had just heard of his wife — while, still 



84 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUREi. 



July, 1909 



further, one was coming and the other 
would not go away. One night the 
crisis came which the woman Hving in 
the apartment below is reported to have 
described as follows : 

''The quarrel which ended in the stab- 
bing began last night about 9:15. There 
was a long quarrel, and then I heard 
screams. The woman suddenly reached 
the door and ran into the hall. She was 
covered with blood and crying : 'Mur- 
der !' Shea came behind her, and before 
anyone could interfere, he caught her by 
the hair and dragged her back into the 
room. Then I sent the little boy for the 
police." At headquarters. Shea said that 
he deserted his wife for Alice Walsh five 
years ago. For some time he had been 
trying to get rid of Alice ! she persisted 
in living with him, and he stabbed her in 
a fit of anger. 

At the hospital it was thought she 
might live in spite of 20 knife wounds. 
The lodge is said to have rallied to the 
support of Brother Shea; an early sug- 
gestion was miade, without being im- 
mediately acted upon, to raise a fund for 
his defense. This ought to impress us 
all with the importance and value of be- 
longing to some secret confederacy. 



QUESTS OF ALETHEIA GROTTO. 

For the first time, and at its twentieth 
annual convention, the Supreme Council 
of the Mystic Order of Veiled Prophets 
of the Enchanted Realm was entertained, 
in June, so well that no excuse was left 
for finding fault. Yet the rain from the 
sky paid little respect to their parade, 
while in spite of the weather they march- 
ed in a kind of crimson Mother Hubbard 
rig, wearing Turkish caps and smoking 
cigars on the way. The cold rain was 
not wholly to their disadvantage, since it 
kept the fool-killer within doors. 

Began as "Deviltry Committee." 

"The Fairchild Deviltry Committee" 
was organized within the membership of 
a Masonic lodge in Hamilton, N. Y., 
twenty years ago, by the Mr. Fairchild 
for whom it was named. It still remains 
necessary to be first a Blue Lodge Mason 
in order to gain entrance to this En- 
chanted Realm of the Deviltry Commit- 
tee. Just as one may go from the Com- 



nandery into the Mystic Shrine and be- 
come a roystering Shriner, so he may go 
from the Blue Lodge into the Enchanted 
Realm and become a hilarious Veiled 
Prophet. Neither the Shrine nor the 
Realm is Masonic, but every person 
found in either has first been a Mason. 

Seventeen members, whose object ap- 
pears to have been fun and frolic, held 
the first meeting of the Deviltry Com- 
mittee in 1889; eight thousand and more 
have since joined. When the order had 
spread in New York and taken root in 
other States, the founder called the or- 
ganization together in a meeting which 
created a Grand Lodge called the Su- 
preme Council. Like the first one, this, 
meeting was held in Hamilton. A board 
of Grand officers was now elected, and 
the constitution and statutes of the Su- 
preme Council were adopted. An obh- 
gation was also adopted, and the rule 
that the turban of a Veiled Prophet 
should conform in color to that selected 
by the lodge to which he belonged; at 
the same time grottoes were interdicted 
from, selecting purple, that royal color 
being reserved to the Supreme Council 
of the order, which has a monarch — who 
is, moreover, a Grand Monarch. What 
more could human ambition crave or 
wait for, than to be the G. M. S. C. M. 
O. V. P. E. R.? 

The Grand Monarch chosen at the 
sixteenth annual meeting, held at Buffalo 
in 1903, was out of sight in secrecy. 
At this time he was already Past Grand 
Steward of the;. Grand Lodge of New 
York, F. & A. M. ; Grand Representa- 
tive of the Grand Chapter, R. A. M., of 
Missouri ; Past Grand Representative of 
the Grand Commanderies, K. T., of both 
Nebraska and New Jersey; Past Master 
of Central Lodge, No. 361, of Brooklyn, 
and York Lodge, No. 197, F. A. M. of 
New York ; Past High Priest of Amity 
Chapter, R. A. M., of New York; Past 
President Fraternal Union of Anointed 
Hif^h Priests ; Past T. I. M. Union Coun- 
cil, R. and S. M., New York : Past Emi- 
nent Commander Palestine Commandery, 
No. 18, K. T., New York, and a Scot- 
. tish Rite Mason ; besides being a mem- 
ber of Mecca Temple, A, A. O. N. M. 
S., and Past Monarch of Azim Grotto. 

At the time when the Supreme Coun- 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



85 



cil was formed, a charter was granted to 
Druid Lodge or Grotto, of Hamilton, but 
its name was changed to Mokanna. Like 
the Mystic Shrine, the Enchanted Reahn 
has the Mohammedan tinge, and these 
are some of the names of Grottoes : Lalla 
Rookh Grotto, Azim Grotto, Zuleika, 
Kedar Khan, Zemzem, Al-Sirat and El- 
Zobeda. The Worcester Grotto, which, 
entertained the twentieth convention in 
June, has a Greek name meaning Truth. 
Worcester Magazine, pubhshed by the 
Board of Trade, made its June edition a 
Masonic number, and in its sketch of 
the local lodge it said that ''the name 
Aletheia was adopted in honor of the 
Greek goddess of Truth." It is the thir- 
teenth grotto, and in 1904 ventured to be 
organized April 13. Perhaps it trusts 
that cancellation will nullify the power 
of the number. 



WILSON MASONRY AGAIN. 

Mr. Writer's trial at Fitchburg, Mass., 
under the new State law enacted to help 
Free Masonry, or Massachusetts grand 
lodgery, was in one sense a trial of Dr. 
Darius Wilson's type of Masonry. In 
Worcester, Dr. Wilson had an assistant 
who helped him initiate about two hun- 
dred men rather more than a year ago. 
This assistant has now made what pur- 
ports to be a confession, which appears, 
in efi'ect, an effort to prove Dr. Wilson 
an even more ridiculous humbug than 
ordinary Masonic manipulators. This 
may be possible. Thomas E. Holt, Dr. 
Wilson's late assistant, says that the Cali- 
fornia earthquake destroyed his home, 
and that he then came East, where he 
saw on Washington street, Boston, one 
Sundav, a number of men in front of 
a building, to whom he gave the Masonic 
sign upon noticing their emblem. They 
insisted on his attending the meeting, and 
the Worshipful Master, with whom he 
had a long talk, insisted on his joining 
the lodge. All he had to do was to pay 
the dues. He says that Wilson, finding 
him to know something about Masonry, 
took him into his confidence and made a 
business proposal which was attractive to 
a man who had been 

Through An Earthquake. 

Holt came to Worcester, where he 



soon gathered a large number of men 
to whom various degrees were given for 
ten, fifteen and thirty-five dollars. To 
the first few only, he gave real Masonry. 
He was supposed to work the Scottish 
Rite, but Wilson framed first, second and 
third degrees, whereas real Scottish Rite 
Masonry lies wholly beyond the first 
three degrees of the Blue Lodge. 

Holt says the Worcester followers of 
Wilson are now as far as ever from be- 
mg real Masons. ''Dr. Wilson gave them 
a lot of dope on paper — not the real 
Masonic signs.'' ''They think it funny 
when no one recognizes their signal vv^hen 
they make the sign of distress ; but the 
real Masons think they are 

Trying to Flag a Train 
when they give their sign. One would 
think that his Worcester initiates were 
much given to desperate calls for rescue ; 
really, such a remark suggests suspicion 
of the genuineness of the confession it- 
self. 

Holt claims to have been a Mason in 
India in the year 1894. He charges that 
Wilson was expelled from the New York 
Grand Lodge, whereupon he set himself 
to "get even" by giving other rites. Al- 
though a lodge made Holt a life mem- 
ber, it will not now recognize him ; and 
while he knows their password and all 
their secrets, they will not admit him 
to a lodge meeting. Having a password, 
he declares, convicts them of not being 
real Masons, because State Masons have 
none. In view of the report of the 
Winter trial, and other printed matter, 
this seems a non-sequiiur. 

Judging from the report of his recent 
confession, Holt is a 

Past Master of Slang. 
For instance, he says of Wilson : "He 
is a smooth article, and gets away witli 
a lot of coin." He avers that some of 
the Wilson initiates are "wise to the 
fact that they got stung" ; most of them, 
however, "think they have got the real 
thing, but they have got another think 
coming." This reminds me of Buflfon's 
familiar saying: "The style is of the 
man" — a saying often misquoted with- 
out the preposition, but probably applica- 
ble in either form to the jingling white- 
apron man. 



S6 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



HONORS PAID FOR. 

Overlook is the name of a fine hotel 
that was built by an electric road as a 
resort a little outside the city of Wor- 
cester, Mass. Not wholly profitable, it 
has now been sold for a Masonic home, 
and when -the purchase was undertaken 
a solicitor of funds approached a prom- 
inent Worcester Mason vv^ith the ques- 
tion, ''How much are you going to give 
for the new Masonic home?" 

"1 am not going to give a dollar." 

"What! Not going to give anything? 
Why, you have been taken into all the 
degrees, have been appointed to all the 
chairs, and have been granted all the 
honors of the order — and that is a great 
honor. You cannot refuse to give some 
return." 

''I want you to understand," was the 
emphatic reply, "that every honor I have 
received in Masonry, I have paid for." 

The truth of his position cannot be 
questioned : Masonry is a thing of price ; 
it costs money; it sets upon its favors a 
cash value. There is a stipulated price 
for initiation, and a price for every ad- 
vanced degree. Expenses for regalia, 
banquets and excursions must be paid, 
running expenses must be met, and dues 
are to be kept up under penalty of sus- 
pension. It costs money to become a 
Mason, continues to cost money to re- 
main an active Mason, while each new 
rite or degree beyond the Blue Lodge is 
one more sluice into which to pour 
money. 

If cash payments were the whole, they 
might yet be made, even though the in- 
vestment yielded meagre returns. But 
granting the Masonic claim to be valid, 
that "as Masons we must surrender 
private judgment," more than money is 
paid. The sacrifice made by every third 
degree Mason, is beyond estimate in 
monetary terms ; yet a price even heavier 
is extorted by the Royal Arch degree, 
and such a price as no honorable and 
no independent man should be willing to 
pledge. A man who promises to aid a 
stranger even though it be in doing 
wrong, sells his character. One who 
pledges himself absolutely to keep any 
secret of any stranger, however evil it 
may be, however hostile in effect to the 



interests of his own best friend, sells true 
fraternity — sells human fellowship. Ab- 
dicating human freedom he sells him- 
self into moral slavery. No cash price 
could be so large. A Mason does in- 
deed pay for all his Masonic honors ; he 
pays money and more. Masonic honor 
costs the price of dishonor. 



COLLEGE FRATERNITY RUSHING. 

Brown University in Providence, R. I., 
which was first called Rhode Island Col- 
lege, and from 1764 to 1770 was at War- 
ren, held this year its 141st commence- 
nient. Among its presidents have been 
men like Francis Wayland, Barnas Sears 
and Ezekiel Robinson. For a number of 
recent years Dr. W. H. P. Faunce, a 
former pastor of the Fifth Avenue Bap- 
tist Church in New York, has been its 
president. 

In his annual report given in June, 
he improved the opportunity to speak of 
the rushing system now in vogue in the 
fraternities. He said : "Boys are pledged 
for life-long associations before they 
have been in college forty-eight hours. I 
beg all the Alumni to aid the university 
authorities in stopping the demoralizing 
and dangerous scramble for new men 
which marks the opening of the college 



j> 



year 

Although this fault is carried to an 
extreme in the college, some degree of 
it seems inseparable from all secret so- 
cieties, including these fraternities. 
Blind, sudden and rushing methods ap- 
pear to belong inseparably with all sorts 
of initiations. Not seldom does it seem 
to be fitly described by his other phrase, 
"Demoralizing and dangerous." It is a 
salient feature, striking early the notice 
of initiates, many of whom having vowed 
in haste repent at leisure. 

In all other secret orders as well as 
in these, members are "pledged to life- 
long associations," and the rush feature 
does not fade out with the lapse of forty- 
eight preliminary hours, nor with the 
lapse of any period of time. Conceal- 
ment purposely precludes part of what 
should precede even lighter undertakings 
than forming permanent associations and 
taking irrevocable vows. Few Masons 
know even the surface of Masonry, be- 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



87 



fore they are hopelessly plunged within 
the very depths of its irrevocable obliga- 
tions, llie real fact of rushing, is one 
of tiie most obvious in the case. How- 
ever slow in deciding to take it, they find 
all the suddenness left for them in the 
actual plunge. 

In his text book of Moral Science, 
President Wayland of Brown treated the 
subect of making promises, in a way that 
virtually condemned the ordinary prac- 
tice of all secret orders, though he did 
not mention them. If his suggestion to 
suspend over night the making of a 
serious promise were followed, not 
students of his university alone, but 
tliousands outside would be kept from 
things '^demoralizing and dangerous," 
into which tiiey are actually rushed, at 
last, however long they have hesitated 
with hesitation due to nothing else more 
than to the forced impossibility of real 
deliberation. 



SO THERE! 

"And the men who oppose woman suf- 
frage say that woman hasn't the mind 
to comprehend politics," remarked a 
politician who had "listened to reasons 
and explanations until every hair on his 
silk hat stood on end." The Companions 
of the Forest were trying to hold an 
election ; Sister McCarthy bossing one, 
while Sister Mahoney steered another 
clique, and each party was the real one. 
A report of the convention began by say- 
ing: "Each faction claiming to be the 
only original legal convention, the dou- 
ble-header meeting of the Grand Circle 
of Massachusetts, Companions of the 
Forest, goes merrily on." 

One faction claimed to be occupying 
the place where the meeting was called ; 
the other claimed sole legality because it 
held the charter, the seal and the books. 
One also claimed the majority of dele- 
gates. No doubt each party was correct 
in declaring that the other was doing all 
the talking. At one hotel a reporter 
whom a delegate was guiding to the lady 
who headed the party there, tried to talk 
with her a little about the newspaper 
talk the opponents were making; upon 
which she responded: "All lies; all of 
it is lies. We are holding the only legal 
convention." The leader herself was 



milder. Smihngly, she said: 'The strong 
can afford to be generous." Her man- 
ner and smile would have driven the 
other side to frenzy. 

The deeper root of the trouble appear- 
ed to be found in the fact that this is 
Supreme Circle year — whatever that may 
be. "This year, the woman who can go 
to the convention of the Supreme Circle 
and remark: T carry in my reticule the 
lOO Massachusetts delegates. What have 
you got?' is in a position to make de- 
mands." Mrs. McCarthy had, besides 
the charter, seal, and books, ii of the 
15 Grand officers; Mrs. Mahoney 's meet- 
ing was attended by only two Grand 
ladies. Not only this, but at Mrs. Mc- 
Carthy's meeting there v/ere three Su- 
preme officers. 

The janitor of Odd Fellows' Hall re- 
fused to rent the room the second morn- 
ing until it should be decided where re- 
sponsibility for damage lay. In the meet- 
ing held there before secession or divi- 
sion took place, blows of the gavel had 
broken a marble slab an inch thick. A 
dance was attempted in the evening, but 
it does not appear to have been very well 
attended — possibly because the Compan- 
ions of the Forest were not yet out of 
the w^oods. 



AMERICAN MASONS IN ENGLAND. 

In London, England, June 3d, Lord 
Ampthill, provincial grand master, con- 
secrated (sic) the American Lodge of 
Free Masons, for citizens of this couii- 

* 

try in London, in the presence of sixty 
grand officers. Deputy Grand Master 
Van Duser, of Pennsylvania, was there, 
and the membership includes twenty-five 
Americans. Lord Ampthill received a 
telegram from the President of the Uni- 
ted States, who said : "I congratulate you, 
your brethren, and the American lodge, 
on the day of its consecration, and felici- 
tate the lodge on its peculiar creation as 
additional evidence of British good feel- 
ing toward the United States, and as an 
additional bond between the English and 
American Masons and nations. 

Is it really so important as all that? 

A responsive message was cabled to 
the President. It will be recollected that 
Grand Lodge Masonry began in London, 



88 



CHUISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



in the same month of the year, one hun- 
dred and ninety-two years before this 
American lodge arrived there. All Amer- 
icans were colonists then, many of them 
being Englishmen. Plymouth Colony 
was less than a hundred years old, and 
its king was George First, who had been 
less than three years on the English 
throne. Baltimore was not yet founded, 
and William Penn, the founder of Penn- 
sylvania, was still living, though he died 
the next year, and, hkely enough — like 
the Plymouth founders — never heard of 
Grand Lodge Masonry. It was the very 
year in which Stanhope displaced 
Townsend as Prime Minister of Eng- 
land. How little he dreamed of such a 
cablegram to such a cabal from an Amer- 
ican President. 



PROFANATION. 

One feature of the secret system is so 
shocking that even to mention it is pain- 
ful. One of its various forms is typi- 
fied where the Templars form a cross in 
marching, — thus literally trampling the 
cross in the public street. Many such 
things, questionable under any circum- 
stances, appear glaringly profane when 
acted by ungodly men. 

Another form is the use of names 
made honorable by noble characters, or 
associated in the Scriptures with sacred 
history. Some of these are persona] 
names; others belong to objects like a 
city, a mountain, or a temple. Like com- 
mon street profanity, this sort selects 
words for the very reasons that ought to 
keep them honored or sacred. Inadvert- 
ance does not excuse the profanation; it 
is elective and designed. 

Women who banquet and dance with 
Freemasons use the name Eastern Star, 
which, however pagan it may be in eso- 
teric significance, is adapted to give the 
unitiated an impression of relating to the 
star of Bethlehem. On the other hand, 
the dancing partners of Odd Fellows use 
the name of the mother of that Patriarch 
from whom God's chosen people derive 
their significance and sacred name. 

The New Testament as well as the Old 
invests this title, given to the patriarch at 
Peniel, with high dignity ; it 'holds a place 
in that profound argument addressed 



to the Romans. Rebekah was his moth- 
er. Can we forget that she was the wife 
of the son of the Father of the Faithful 
who believed the angelic promise con- 
cerning him, with faith counted right- 
eousness ? To Rebekah herself came the 
word of Jehovah before her immortal son 
was born. The biography of this woman 
is inseparable from the essential course 
and range of Sacred history. The dying 
words of the father who blessed the pa- 
triarchs of Israel's tribes, mention his 
honored mother as wife of the child of 
promise, in whose seed the heirs of the 
father of all the faithful should be called. 

''And he charged them and said unto 
them : T am to be gathered unto my 
people ; bury me with my father^ in the 
cave that is in the field of Machpelah, 
which is before Mamre, in the land of 
Canaan, which Abraham bought with the 
field from Ephron the Hittite, for a pos- 
session of a burying place." There they 
huried Abraham and Sarah his wife ; 
there they buried Isaac and Rebekah his 
wife ; and there I buried Leah — the field 
and the cave that is therein, which was 
purchased from the children of Heth.' " 
Guarded walls protect her grave at He- 
bron, but lips unguarded trifle with her 
name — dragging it into silly lodges and 
ball-rcoms. 

An instance of this kind occurred not 
long ago at Northampton, Mass., the 
home of President Edwards. Not con- 
tent with sharing the common abuse of 
the name Rebekah, certain women of 
Northampton also brought from across 
the Connecticut river flowing by, the 
name of that woman who, more than al- 
most any other, was the mother of high- 
er education for the girls of America — 
not to say of the world. They have 
named their local frivolous club, the 
Mary Lyon Rebekah Lodge. But on the 
stone marking the grave in the grounds 
of Mt. Holyoke College, teachers and 
missionaries educated there have read 
this sentiment of their honored founder : 

"I fear nothing save that I may not 
know and do my whole duty." 

Think of such a name under the feet 
of a dancing lodge ! 

A Northampton lodge of Odd Fellows 
was invited by this set of women to an 
evening entertainment on the nineteenth 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



S9 



anniversary of their American society. 
A Methodist minister, who might have 
been rebuked by John Wesley, and who 
was pastor in the place where the saintly 
President Edwards once preached and 
lived, made the address of the evening. 
There followed a drill by ten young 
women, who also attended, in a tableau, 
a young woman called the Goddess of 
Liberty. Other things entered into the 
evening's entertainment; and after all 
these, and the minister's address, the 
Mary Lyon Rebekah Lodge ended of 
course with dancing. 

Yet, beyond the river the stone at the 
grave still bore the same legend in the 
light of quiet stars. 



IS MASSACHUSETTS MASONRY 
REGULAR? 

The new lodge law and its testing in 
the Writer trial, may result in making 
the status of the so-called Massachusetts 
Grand Lodge better known. It would be 
amusing if that body should be hoisted 
by its own petard. Possession is nine 
points of the law, and there is no lack 
of influence, yet this Grand Lodge may 
be too well glazed for a fortress from 
which to throw stones. For historic de- 
tails herewith subjoined, w^e disclaim re- 
sponsbility. We merely report that Ma- 
sonic enemies of the so-called Massachu- 
setts Grand Lodge are understood to 
allege the following among various 
points of the regular and irregular Mas- 
sachusetts Masonic history. 

Until the year 1902 there had been in 
the state, and among various pretended 
bodies, only one genuine Grand Lodge 
since the death of Dr. Warren at Bunker 
Hill. That was an African lodge con- 
taining: no white men. In 1769 the 
Grand Master of Scotland annointed 
Tosenh Warren as his Denutv, to be Pro- 
vincial Grand ]\ faster of St. Andrew's 
Provincial Grand Lodge. Jurisdiction 
extended from P)Oston one hundred 
miles. The authoritv of this provincial 
lodge over subordinate lodges exoired 
^^dien the denutv of the Grand Master of 
Scotland died in battle. No new apnoint • 
mcnt WIS made. The only Grand Lodge 
fver existing: in the state w'ith authoritv 
from the original Grand Lodge of Lon- 



don is that still maintained by colored 
Masons. Dr. Warren's authority, how- 
ever, was regularly Masonic, though 
coming round by way of Scotland, and 
not, like that of Prince Llall, the first 
colored grand master, directly from 
England. 

The end of the provincial Grand 
Lodge having come in 1775, Joseph 
Webb assumed that he could continue to 
act with the other officers of the lodge, 
doubtless because he had in Dr. War- 
ren's lifetime been his deputy. Yet it 
is part of the Constitutions of the Grand 
Lodge of England that ''The provincial 
Grand Lodge emanates from the author- 
ity of the provincial Grand Master," and 
that it ''ceases to exist on the death, sus- 
pension, or removal of the provincial 
Grand Master." Without authority of 
even the subordinate lodges, these usurp- 
ers pretended to form an Independent 
Grand Lodge. In 1792 it joined with 
another which assumed to be a resuscita- 
tion of one that had passed cut of exist- 
ence, and the two formed what now con- 
tinues to claim to be the "Grand Lodge 
of Massachusetts." 

What is called throughout the Masonic 
world "The Massachusetts Departure," 
took place in 1882. In that year it ad- 
mitted as Masonic, and under Grand 
Lodge regulations, such bodies as Ro-:al 
Arch Chapters and Commanderies, with 
others. Regular Grand Lodge T^Iasonry 
throughout all countries, on the contrary, 
has nothing to do wath any but Blue 
Lodge subordinate lodges. In conse- 
quence of this departure from Ancient 
Craft Masonrv, the Declaration of St. 
John's Grand Lodge says in part: 

"By this preamble, the Grand Lodge 
of Massachusetts affiliated with certain 
bodies which it declared to be Masonic, 
and which never before the adoption of 
these Sections were recognized by any 
pT^nd lodges as being ^Masonic." . . . 
"The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, as 
n Grand Lodp'e of Free and Accented 
Ma^'^ns, h^s therefore ceased to exist." 

This conrUision rests on the state- 
n-ient of eminent Masonic authoritv that 
"If a Grand Lodge has denarted from 
the original plan of ^Masonrv, it ha^ 
ceased to be a Grand Lodge of the craft." 



90 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



The same authority says that in such a 
case it "would become the duty of gen- 
uine Masons to estabhsh against it, and 
in spite of it, a genuine Grand Lodge." 
This was done when St. John's Grand 
Lodge was formed in Boston, November, 
1902. It conforms to "regular Mas- 
onry" by recognizing as its subordinates 
only Blue Lodges. Yet it is probably 
obnoxious to the lodge that has made 
the Massachusetts Departure, and has 
secured the law that was enacted in order 
to give it a monopoly of the trade in de- 
grees, and protect its high rate by outlaw- 
ing competition. Nevertheless, St. John's 
Lodge has appealed to "all the Grand 
Lodges throughout the world to cry out 
in opposition to the threatened subvers- 
ion and destruction of true Masonry." 



TWENTY=FIVE CENT LINKS. 

The Daily Tribune of Beaver Falls, 
Pa., reports that a minister from 
Youngstown, O., who is a member of 
the East Ohio Methodist Conference, is 
introducing what it calls a "novel plan 
for furthering Christianity." Novel, it 
surely is, and one that neither of the 
Apostles appears to have thought of ; the 
only one we could imagine devising the 
25-cent-link plan is Judas. 

The title by which the Ohio man is 
known is in part borrowed from Scrip- 
ture, for he is called an evangelist; yet 
this name is perhaps used in something 
other than its Biblical sense when com- 
bined in the composition of his dis- 
tinctive personal title. It is nothing new 
for a Methodist preacher to do the work 
of an evangelist in preaching the gospel, 
but this man is apparently more or other 
than an evangelist; he is the Evangelist 
of Universal Brotherhood. An evan- 
gelist does indeed promote brotherhood 
of a real kind, but his work is not strict- 
ly identical with that of the one called 
The Evangelist. 

About two years ago he made a trip 
around the world; his present plan in- 
cludes another journey around the globe. 
In the first, he secured many names and 
addresses ; before starting again, he had 
more than four hundred names of per- 
sons whom we understand to be connect- 
ed with his "world movement," and a 



thousand "links" had been taken. It is 
a fair question whether he will effective- 
ly promote Christianity in connection 
with the lodge system which excludes 
the name of Him who is the Head of 
Christianity. He seems to dream — or to 
wish others to dream of a fellowship be- 
tween light and darkness, between evan- 
gelistic proclamation in the name of 
Christ sounded from the housetops, and 
whispers in the narrow cell of a dark 
and secret lodge ; his chain is golden, the 
links are linked with coins, souvenirs can 
be obtained, and by and by he will have 
a book to sell. The newspaper report 
says : 

Rev. Van Kirk, in speaking of the 
plan, said : 

"All are most fraternally requested to 
become a part of this great world move- 
ment by taking one or more links, each 
of which is valued at 25 cents. The 
stamp and cards for each link cost about 
10 cents, leaving 15 cents for carrying 
fraternal peace and good will to our fel- 
low men around the world. An interest- 
ing and suggestive collection of cards 
could thus be secured and at the same 
time share in spreading the gospel of 
the Fatherhood of God and the Brother- 
hood of Man throughout the earth. 

"It is our plan to give addresses wher- 
ever opportunity affords and afterward 
give to the world in book form an illus- 
trated account of the tour with its ob- 
servations, experiences and of the Golden 
Chain." 

Rev. Van Kirk will speak in the 
Grace M. E. church in New Brighton 
on Sunday morning and on Monday 
evening he will address Robertson Lodge, 
I. O. O. F., of New Brighton. 



"Have no fellowship with the unfruit- 
ful works of darkness, but rather re- 
prove them" (Eph. 5:11). 



WANTED. 

I will pay twenty-five cents for the 
Jiily number of the Cynosure for the 
year 1903. 

Rev. A. J. Millard. 

1410 Gaines street, Little Rock, Ark. 



Some men feed on doubts as a fungus 
feeds on muck. 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



91 



Jletti0 of ®uir Pori 



RESOLUTIONS NEW ENGLAND BOARD 
Relative to the Late Rev. J. P. Stoddard. 

(These resolutions were received too 
late for the April number and the editor 
regrets their having been mislaid and so 
omitted until now.) 

At the monthly meeting of the Board 
of the New England Christian Associa- 
tion, held at the headquarters of the As- 
sociation, 560 Columbus avenue, Bos- 
ton, March i, 1909, the following reso- 
lutions were heartily and imanimously 
adopted, relat.we to the death of our be- 
loved brother and leader. Rev. J. P. 
Stoddard, who passed to his eternal rest 
on January 29, 1909, in the 77th year 
of his age : 

Resolved, That we deeply and sin- 
cerely lament the death of our beloved 
leader, and General Secretary, the Rev. 
J. P. Stoddard. 

Resolved (2d), That we desire to ex- 
press our gratitude to God for sparing 
him so long-, as our efficient and honor- 
ed leader; and also our appreciation of 
the help received by his Godly life. As 
a man and a Christian, he was always 
the same warm-hearted, genial, court- 
eous Christian gentleman, and one whose 
life commended^ itself to the community 
at large. 

Resolved (3d), That we record our 
testimony to his faithful devotion to the 
principles of truth and righteousness, re- 
lative to the whole Kingdom of Christ, 
in its aggressive work at home and 
abroad; Mr. Stoddard was the friend of 
every righteous cause. 

Resolved (4th), That we express our 
high appreciation of his untiring effort 
by speech and pen to uphold and ad- 
vocate the principles for which the as- 
sociation stands. We especially record 
our appreciation of the kindly, court- 
eous manner of our beloved brother's 
approach to those who differed widely 
from his point of view. We realize in 
his death that the board has lost a true, 
and faithful friend, whose interests were 
always on his heart, and to whose sup- 
port he was always ready to contribute 



with open hand. He was a man of 
genial nature, strong convictions and un- 
swerving aim in effort to promote the 
interests of the Redeemer's Kingdom. 

Resolved (5th), That we express our 
sincerest sympathy with all the members 
of the bereaved family in Boston, and 
elsewhere, especially to his beloved wife, 
genial companion and co-worker, for so 
many years, and we commend her to 
the loving sympathy of the ever present 
Savior, the only true and abiding friend. 

Resolved (6th), That a copy of these 
resolutions be given to Mrs. Anna E. 
Stoddard and published in the Home 
l^ight and Christian Cynosure. 

Rev. a. K. MacLennan,, 
Rev. Samuel McNaugher^ 
Committee. 



A Methodist Episcopal pastor in Ohio 
writes for suggestions and aid in his 
struggle against the lodge Baalism in 
his city. If the readers of the Cynosure 
cannot do anything more they can at 
least pray for such men. He writes, 
''The spiritual ebb is low, a new Odd 
Fellow lodge is formed here and my 
members are going in, and are opposing 
me in my teachings on the lodge. I am 
a young man in the ministry. I want to 
preach on the Church vs. the Lodge. 
Can you aid me?" 



QUESTION. 

Will our friends in different States in- 
form themselves as to the law under 
which the lodges of their State have in- 
corporated ? We have seen several state- 
ments that the lodges are securing in- 
corporation articles or laws in dift'erent 
States by which they are able to escape 
all taxation on their property. It is said 
that they take the ground that lodges 
are charitable institutions the same as 
churches. Let us hear what the exact 
facts are in your State. 



GOOD WORDS. 

From Rev. E. Zath, May wood. 111. 

"I intend to continue taking the Cynos- 
ure, as long as I can spare the dollar, 
which I hope will be the case as long as 
I live." 



92 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



SECRETARY STODDARD'S LETTER. 

Lancaster, Pa., June i8th 1909. 
Dear Cynosure : 

I expected to write you from Ohio 
this month, but delays at Chicago, 111., 
and Washington, D. C, so occupied my 
time as to make it expedient to work 
nearer home for the rest of this month. 
The Lord willing, I will report from 
Ohio next month. 

Attendance at our Annual Meeting is 
always an inspiration. This year was not 
an exception. The coming together of 
any company of earnest Christians, in- 
terested in a common cause, could 
scarcely fail to arouse enthusiasm. Truly 
God has given our Association a mis- 
sion, and sustained our work all through 
the year ! 

While helping our General Secretary 
in the preparation for this meeting, I 
found opportunity to attend a conference 
of Free Methodist brethren; a pastoral 
gathering of Swedish Mission brethren ; 
a Synodical meeting of the Reformed 
Presbyterian church, and also looked in 
on a District Synod of our Missouri 
Lutheran friends. These all gathered in 
Chicago. I spoke when there was op- 
portunity and received subscriptions to 
the Cynosure, and invitations to lecture 
at a future date. I failed to discover 
any intention on the part of any of these 
bodies to recede from the strong position 
they have taken in opposition to the 
Lodge. 

A lecture given in the Free Methodist 
church, Aurora, 111., was not largely at- 
tended. Questions and discussions in- 
dicated interest, however. I found a 
brother of many years' acquaintance in 
charge of this church. May the Lord 
bless D. W. Hart and 'help him in his 
difficult work. 

At Roseland, a District now in the 
limits of Chicago, I found an opportun- 
ity to lecture in the Third Christian Re- 
formed church, of which Rev. Wm. 
Stuart is pastor. This church is an out- 
growth of the two Holland churches of 
the same faith close at hand. A good 
foundation has been laid, and there is 
every reason to expect a large, strong 
church in the years to come. There will 
be no compromise with the lodge, if the 



present policy prevails. Pastor and peo- 
ple were most cordial. The collection 
was $6.35. 

In company with our General Secre- 
tary, I visited the F. M. church at Glen 
Ellyn, 111., May 30th and spoke to some 
''who received the truth gladly." There 
were five ministers in the congregation. 
At a brotherhood meeting, and later at a 
prayer meeting, it was my privilege to 
meet many of the leaders of the College 
Church, at Wheaton. This church is 
much favored in having for pastor Dr. 
Wm. Evans of the Moody Bible Insti- 
tute. Dr. Evans has never been known 
to apologize for the church's opposition 
to the lodge. 

On the evening of June ist I spoke to 
a large congregation in the Christian Re- 
formed church at Munster, Ind. I was 
the guest of Rev. Wm. Borgman. The 
faithful domine had made prepartion for 
my coming. He interpreted in the Hol- 
land language to the few who could not 
fully understand the English. A neigh- 
boring Domine also helpefi. The collec- 
tion was $15.76. I need not write of the 
helpful Annual Meeting addresses as 
they will doubtless appear in the Cyno- 
sure. 

On my return to Washington, D. C, I 
found the church of the Brethren packed 
to the doors, many visitors being pres- 
ent who had been at their Annual Meet- 
ing at Harrisburg, Va. This was an op- 
portunity to meet many from a distance 
who are interested in N. C. A. work. 1 
have spent some time in work in Balti- 
more, Md., York and Columbia, Pa. I 
find friends encouraged and ready to help 
on the work. Rev. J. Geo. Bornman, 
Lutheran pastor at Columbia, entertained 
your Secretary and helped much in 
pushing the work. Since coming to 
Washington I hear of some who have 
left lodges, as a result of our recent con- 
vention and other meetings. 

More meetings are called for. Let us 
praise God and move on to victory. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



God's angels open locks as easily as 
His sunbeams open rosebuds. — H. W\ 
Warren. 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



93 



Rev. F. J. Davidson sent in a list of 
eight subscribers to the Cynosure, and 
reports having dehvered one lecture and 
five sermons against Secret Societies. He 
attended the Convention at Harrisburg, 
111., last month. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOOD'S LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., May 31, 1909. 

I promised in my last letter to tell 
you about the Church Board meeting. 
We had a great meeting. God got glory 
out of that meeting. One of the lead- 
ing ministers of this State Board is anti- 
secret; he preached on Saturday before 
the Board, from the text, "I am the 
way." He said, I cannot see hov^ the 
preachers who belong to secret orders 
have time to mix with sinners and god- 
less men and still have time to preach 
the Gospel ! He said the preachers in the 
early church did not have time to even at- 
tend to the poor widows, but looked out 
men among themselves to take care of 
that part of the church work. Acts 6:1-9. 
1 his work of taking care of the poor 
was done by the church and not by 
the lodge. The men that were set apart 
to do this work were full of the Holy 
Ghost, not full of whisky! 

He said, what time have you brother 
preachers got to join with the world, 
with saloonist and all kinds of men to 
take care of the poor? '*Ah, brother, 
that is your way." Jesus says, 'T am 
the way, the truth and the life, no man 
Cometh to the Father but by Me." In 
tiiat great day coming, my brother, vou 
will have to stand before God and give 
an account for your stewardship here. 
You are hand in hand with the world: 
The people all over the house said 
Amen. Rev. P. Knowles is a preacher 
of high standing. He is a leader in the 
church work of this State. 

The Board meeting was held with 
the First Baptist Church of Dermott, 
Ark., Rev. I. G. Bailey, pastor. Rev. 
Mr. Bailey don't allow "Annual Ser- 
mons" in his church, nor the use of the 
burial ceremonies of the secret orders, 
either. After the close of the service 
as we were coming out of the church, I 
stopped at the door and spoke to the 
President of the State Baptist Sunday 



School, and asked him how he liked Rev. 
P. A. Knowles' sermon against secret 
societies? I knew when I asked him 
how he felt, because he is a Mason. 
He said the sermon was all right. I 
said. Are you still in the lodge? "Who. 
said I belonged to the lodge?" I said, 
You told me you were an Eastern Star 
member at Fordyce, Ark., summer be- 
fore last at the Women's State Board 
meeting. He said, "Yes, I am in them 
yet for policy, but I don't go to their 
meetings, I am just after the policy." 
I said that is why you ought to come 
out of the thing, if it is too bad for a 
preacher to visit it is too bad for a 
preacher to belong to. They use your 
name to get others into it. He is a good 
man. He smiled and walked on out and 
I sent up a prayer to my Father for him 
that He might let him have sight, for 
he is blind on that thing. Ah ! Brother 
Phillips, my prayer is going up for the 
preachers. Jesus gives them the keys to 
the kingdom, but not to keep up the 
lodges that lead men to death and hell. 
A great preacher in this State died 
not long ago that used to be a leader 
of the Masonic lodge ; he said, when he 
was sick, "I don't want a man that be- 
longs to a secret order to preach my 
funeral." That is enough to show any- 
one that he had found the order was a 
wicked thing. A deacon of one of the 
churches at Dermott, Ark., joined an 
order no-t long ago, and they had an in- 
stallation service not many days after 
they "made the deacon over." After the 
officers weiie installed they began to 
dance. This deacon of the church had 
to collect the money from the dancers. 
As he was walking among them to col- 
lect the money from each dancing gen- 
tleman the crowd laughed and said, "pay 
the deacon for your dance." "Give the 
deacon your money, boys." Brother 
Phillips, that is bad on the man that 
handles the Lord's Supper, don't you 
tliink so? There is a woman that lives 
the third door from me who is an old 
widow, about sixty-five years old ; she 
joined the female part of the K. of P. 
lodge and stayed in the lodge three 
years. She got behind in her dues about 
three months. When she got the money 



94 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 



she went to the lodge to pay up and 
they would not let her reinstate. They 
said she was too old. So you see they 
robbed that poor old widow and would 
not let her come in, but kept her money. 
My heart aches when I think of these 
conditions. I am praying for the poor 
preachers that are in the lodge trap. 
God bless the N. C. A. 

Yours for the work, Lizzie Woods. 



A DEBATE WITH AN ODD FELLOW. 

Lundy, Mo., June 2, 1909. 
The Christian Cynosure. Greeting: 

I have just got home from Mountain 
View, Mo., where I was engaged in a 
meeting. I was invited there by Bro. 
M. L. Londrum. He got the Christian 
Church building for me to preach in; 
so I began to "preach the Word'' (II. 
Tim. 4:2) and reprove and rebuke. Their 
preacher, T. J. Head, heard me twice, 
but could not stand ''sound doctrine' 
and while I was showing the people they 
must "hear Christ" (Luke 9:35), Rev. 
T. J. Head could not stand it and cried 
out, "Do you belong tO' the Masons or 
Odd Fellows?" I said, "Why, do you 
call in question what I say?" That made 
him worse and he said, "I belong to 
four orders. Masons, Odd Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias and Red Men." I 
then began to tell the people how the 
orders take the people intO' them blind- 
folded, and that they sometimes kill the 
poor blind fellow ; that the Masons killed 
an M. E. preacher, J. W. Johnston, at 
Huntington, W. Va., Jan. 10, 1870, 
while taking the 7th degree, and many 
others have lost their lives while en- 
gaged in that kind of foolishness. 

Brother Head began to feel worse and 
others began to twist about in their seats, 
lie again cried out and wished to be let 
alone (Luke 8:28). I asked him to 
come to the house where I was stop- 
ping, and have a talk with me, and to 
let me show him whether the orders 
were in harmony with the Bible. After 
I dismissed he came up to me and asked 
me to give him the Odd Fellow's pass- 
word. Here it is, said I, "Fides." 

He then called the house to order and 
said he would meet me there in a public 
debate and he affirmed "that the prin- 



ciples of Odd Fellowship as taught in 
Odd Fellow lodges are morally and 
scripturally right." I said all right. The 
time was set for Saturday, May 29th, 
and we met at 10 a. m. The fight be- 
tween ''light" and "darkness" began. It 
lasted four hours. It was wonderful to 
watch him try to defend a Christless 
lodge. He said, "Christ and His Apos- 
tles belonged to a secret order." I shov/- 
ed it to be lie No. i (John 18:20). He 
said, "Odd Fellowship was as old as 
God." Lie No. 2. The first lodge was 
organized at Manchester, England, 1812. 
See Chambers' Encyclopedia on Odd Fel- 
lowship. He said, "It would live on 
through eternity." I did not deny that, 
but I thought it would be in that place 
mentioned in Rev. 14:9-11, where Odd 
Fellows go and others like them that 
teach with the fingers (Prov. 6:12-16), 
for that is one of the things that the 
Lord hates. 

Well, it was a great victory for the 
Truth. One old man that had been an 
Odd Fellow for a long time said in the 
presence of Brother Head, "No man 
could be an Odd Fellov/ and a Chris- 
tian." Several of the order men I think 
will give up the lodge. I had Bro. J.- 
E. Armstrong, of Elk Creek, Mo., mod- 
erate for me. He has belonged to five 
secret orders, but he left them all when 
he saw how bad they were. So may 
the good work go on until all come out 
of the Christless lodges and go to work 
in the name of Christ. (Col. 3:17.) 

I am having a hard fight in the 
"Ozarks" just now, but the Lord is 
blessing my labor. 

I am your brother in the one church 
and a,gainst the orders of men. 

J. L. Davis, Evangelist. 



A man to be conscious of divine lead-^ 
ing must make spiritual things his chief 
business. — Dr. McBryde. 



Memory is a bank into which we must 
first make some deposits ere we can 
draw out in time of need. — J. S. Shoe- 
maker. 



When true faith grips one end of 
prayer, God will grip the other. 



July, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



95 



STANDARD WORKS 

ON 

Secret Societies 

FOR SALE BY THE 

National Christian Association, 

22 1 West Madison Street, Cliioago, IlL 



"PillPPF Ppp5 



111! 



l\ 



>3 



BY- 



REV. SHERLOCK BRISTOL. 

336 Pages* 

Cloth, 5X7j^, Postpaid, : One Dollar 



There Is nothing so Interesting to the humAn 
heart as human experience; an<J this yolume, set 
ting forth scenes in the life of Rev. Sherlock Brl»^ 
tol, presents a wider range of experience In many 
lines of thought and action, and a greater varletj 
of adventures than are often found coucentrnted In 
a single human life. The book contains ninch that 
Is amusing and Inspirlng.^Bev. J. H. Fairchlld, 
D. D., President of Oberlln College. 



Rev. Sherlock Bristol now lives In Los AnieelM, 
Cal. The Editor of the Cynosure began the jxjruBal 
of "The Pioneer Preacher" as a duty, which soon 
changed Into keenest pleasure. The price la Jl, 
postpaid. And anyone dlssatlsfled after rending 
will have the dollar refunded upon the return of 
the book. The late President Fairchihi, of Oberlln, 
from whom we quote above, picked up thU book 
for a half hour's scanning, but did not lay It down 
until he had read It through. Address 

CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE, 
2ai West Madison St. - Chicago, Ills 



Divorce and Remarriage 

An Appeal for Reform 

By ELDER I. J. ROSENBERGER, 

COVINQTON, OHIO. 



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ON FREEMASONRY 



FBEEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of "^^^lly Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
Institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
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pages, cloth, $1.00; paper covei., 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- 
trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
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conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
jhich are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
.vuraey of this work has been attested by high and 
unimpeachable Masonic authority. Cloth, $1.85; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 

OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 

KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master. Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
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A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc., 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen have 
been taken from the columns of the Christian Cyno- 
sure and published in pamphlet form. While not 
strictly accurate, it is substantially true, and as 
such is vouched for by Rev. S. A. Scarvie. of 
Decorah. Iowa (R. F. D. G). a very excellent 
•''hrlstian gentleman, and a socoder for conscience* 
'ike from this order. 10 cents. 



96 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1909. 




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KNICMn 
TtHPlAH. 





KNICNTS 
Kit) CROSS 



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DECREES 



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MA^SONIC CHART. 

ILLUSTRATING THE RELATION OF SOME OF THE DEGREES AND RITES IN 

FREEMASONRY TO EACH OTHER. 

The accompanying chart represents one hundred and forty two degrees. 

I. The American Rite of 13 degrees; 2. The Scotch Rite of 33 degrees: 

3. The Egyptian Rite of 96 degrees. 4. The Mystic Shrine of one degree. 

5. The Eastern Star of 5 degrees for Master Masons and for women. Tkese are side degrees, and not 
genuine masonry. 

The Symbolic degrees, or Blue Lodge of three degrees, are common to every Masonic rite, whether 
American, Scotch, or Egyptian, or whichever of the Masonic rites, named in Mackey's Masonic Encyclo- 
i;?dia one may choose to investigate. 

This chart shows in the Blue Lodge the Dosition of the Worshipful Master and some of the other offi- 
cers of "the lodge. Several positions of the ca^tdidate who is being initiated are also shown. In the Master 
f4a?on's aegree is r€r:ogn\zed the murder, buriai aul resurrection .«ene ao full of r^Usrious slgnifi<> 'nee tc 
)iree masons. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



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EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MEBRITT, 

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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

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GRACIOUSLY DELIVERED 

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TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

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CHICAGO. AllSUST. 1909. 




% Praget 



By the Rev. A. Ilyiid-Lindsay 

Lord, I thank Thee for life, and for the 
privileg-e of living it, for faith to strengthen 
it, hope to brighten it, love to sweeten it, 
and truth to enlighten it. May the duty of 
each day he performed faithfully, responsi- 
bility met bravely, opportunity embraced 
heartily; and while I must not wish for 
sorrow, yet when it comes, help me, Lord, 
to find thy sweet portion in it, and in its 
darkness may I ever look for the glints of 
Thy welcome sunshine. To everything 
which in Thy wisdom Thou dost send to 
my life, may I be able to say with sincerity, 
^'Thy will be done." Give me the grace 
to be courageous in danger, patient in suffer- 
ing, pure in thought, kind in deed, and true 
in friendship. And when my 

weary soul weighs anchor, <and the last load 
of life's freight has been placed aboard, cut 
softly and tenderly, O Lord, this earthly 
cable that binds me to the shore of time, 
and assure me a safe voyage across the *'bar'' 
and I shall count all the pains and penalties 
of this mortal life a privilege to bear, when 
knov/lng at last I shall hear the "Well 
done'' from my heavenly Pilot. Amen. 

— The ]\^eiv York Observer. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
850 We^ Madison Street, Chicago. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Per year, in advance, $ 1 .00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
nnake a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
s^nd no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19. i897, at the 
Poet office at Chicago, Dl., under Aci ol March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Victory, by Tlicmas E. Kennedy 97 

The Denver Resolution 97 

"Independent Order Bnai Britii" Secret 

Work 93 

The Preacher Help 98 

A Spelling Lesson , 93 

"Give a Joint Ball" 9s 

Moral and Spiritual' Counterfeits, by Rev. 

James M. Gray 99 

Remarks by Rev. H. H. George, D. D...101 
The Bible and Secret Societies, by Pres- 
ident C. A. Blanchard 105 

Answering a Correspondent 107 

Woman's Organizations, by Mrs. N. E. 

Kellogg 107 . 

Analysis of Lodge Oaths, by Rev. G. A. 

Pegram HI 

The Help of the Lord 118 

Not Almost Rule But Quite Exception. . .US 

Labor Unions 119 

A Statesman to College Men llD 

A Lump from a Trowel ^ 120 

The Elsie Sigel Mystery 120 

Do Lodges Pay Taxes? 120 

Tennessee Needs Organizing 121 

Secretary Stoddard's Letter 122 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter 123 

Good Words from Friends 124 

Same Old Word 12? 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book gives^ 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with' 85 en- 
gravings. The oaths, obligations and lectures are 
quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flexible- 
cloth, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles- 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Kev, B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis,. 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes : "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's* too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 

SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
shining Freemasons in the Christian Church. 10 
cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THL 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By "Spectator,' Ananta, Ga, 16 pages; 
6 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 

LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigions 
S3'steni, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion' ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
interesting. 30 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workinsrs of 
Preemasonry," by kx-President Charles G. Finney» 
of Oberlin College. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the Byes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper. 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Assoqiatlon. 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

Its relation to civil government and the Chris- 
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un-Christian, anti-republican and despotic char- 
acter of Freemasonry is proved from the highest 
Masonic authorities. 5 cents. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly t© ilie world; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOI-UME XLII. 



CHICAGO, AUGUST 1909. 



NUMBER 4 



VICTORY. 

Not by Might^ nor by Power, but by My Spirit. 

1. 

"Not by might, not by power;" 
The conqueror's sword shall smite 
In vain, his kingdom pass away: 
His splendor as a flower 
Which blooms but for a day 
Shall surely pass away 
Before the conquering Right. 

2. 
"Not by power," 

Strong customs, base as strong 
With all the power which centuries of sway 
Have given, not long 
Shall still have rule, the day 
Shall come when God, the lord of light 
Shall stretch his hand to smite 
And they shall pass away. 

3. 

"Not by power," 

Kings, emperors have striven 

To overthrow the right 

And all hell's hosts have fought 

Since man to earth was known. 

Defeated hour by hour, 

Their mighty armies riven 

Before the sword of light, 

Their powers shall come to naught. 

Unshaken, still, God sits upon His throne 

And rules the world alone. 



But by My Spirit, saith the Lord, Most High, 
Before the breath, the word of My command 
The mightiest powers of sin shall surely 

fail. 
They shall in nowise stand 
Before the living right, which shall prevail 
While highest heaven resounds with victory. 

Thomas E. Kennedy. 



— PresideM Taft seems to carry out 
the McKinley-Roosevelt policies so far 
as subserviency to secret orders is con- 
cerned. The Bee Hive says : ''President 
Taft has given expression to his appre- 
ciation of t'he work of tJhe fraternal as- 
sociation, in a letter to the secretary of 
the National Fratermal Congress, in these 
words : 

"I realize the power which these fra- 
ternal associations exercise for the good 
of their members, their protection in 
sickness, and the protection at their 
death of those depending upon them. I 
sincerely hqpe that the efforts of all may 
be exerted in perfecting and perpetuat- 
ing a system by which the two com- 
mendable purposes of all such societies 
may be fully achieved." 



I love the world the more, because I 
know it is God's world; even as a dry 
leaf given by a lover is dearer than all 
pearls from whoso loves us not. — Theo- 
dore Parker. 



THE DENVER RESOLUTION. 

The Springfield Republican of July 14 
said : 

"The national education association at 
its recent meeting in Denver adopted a 
resolution demanding the abolition of 
fraternities and sororities in all public 
schools, upon the ground that their de- 
parture is essential to the maintenance of 
the democracy of the schools. It is to 
be noted that this positioii was adopted 
by a unanimous vote. There is no need 
for further demonstration of the fact that 
the educators of the country, whatever 
they may think about secret societies in 
colleges, are agreed that they have no 
legitimate place in the public schools." 

What is thought of the effect of col- 
lege fraternities on the scholars>hip of 
college students, appears to be coming 
to light. Opinions may be expected to 
gain freedom of expression through the 
discussion of the same question in con- 
nection with institutions supported by 
public funds. The subject has thus been 
virtuallv treated with vis^or already. Its 



98 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



iden'tit'y is emphiasized by the fact that 
this year's high school senior is next 
year's college freshman, who, as a boy 
or a frat., will be only a few weeks older 
when he matriculates, than when he 
graduates. 



I. O. B. B. Secret Work. 

It is generally known that secret work is 
not a part of Judaism, and the secret work 
in Jewish fraternal orders is an importa- 
tion. Yet members of these Jewish orders 
will not part with it and give it the place 
of honor, not even secondary to the prin- 
ciples of the order. It seems that it will 
not he abolished at the next constitutional 
Grand Lodge session, and it is a great pity. 
With the abolition of this secret work the 
labor of our. order would be greatly en- 
hanced. And yet when we come to regard 
those who are so violent in their support 
of its retention, we will find that for the 
most they are recruited from the ranks of 
those who have cast intense Jewish cere- 
monialism to the winds and cling to this 
work for no plausible reason whatsoever. 
Without the secret work, the I. O. B. B. 
would be materially strengthened.^— Jewish 
Outlook, June 11, 1909. 

The Independent Order Bnai Brith is 
recruited for the most part from those 
who have cast their Jewish ceremonial- 
ism ''to the winds," and yet are intense- 
ly devoted to the ceremonialism of their 
secret lodge. How do our readers ac- 
count for the fact? Let us hear from 
them. 



THE PREACHER HELP. 

Here is a case in real life. A member 
of a Missouri church had gone to an- 
other State. He and the pastor belonged 
to the same lodge as well as the same 
church. After a time the pastor re- 
ceived a letter from his lodge-church 
brother asking for a letter of dismis- 
sion from both lodge and church. In 
the letter was a check for more than 
the amount necessary to cover his lodge 
dues, with a request that any balance be 
returned to him and also a statement 
that he would send his church dues later. 
The pastor did as requested, and then 
wrote the following answer : 

''Dear Brother — Request has been 
made to the lodge with endorsed check 
and request has been made to the 
church without the dues. Church-letter 



will be sent Central Baptist. The man 
has a very light case of Christianity 
who will pay lodge dues before he pa)^s 
v/hat he owes the Lord. Will a man 
rob God?" 

There is no good which a man is able 
to do that he cannot do in the Church 
of- God. It is a serious reflection on 
the blood bought church for a Chris- 
tian " to turn away from the church to 
the lodge. Yet this man is not an ex- 
ception. Thousands who pay their dues 
to lodges because compelled to do so, 
refuse to pay their debts to the Lord, 
and then criticise the church for its in- 
efficiency. Shame! — Gospel Advocate. 



A SPELLING LESSON. 

■ In the July number of The Circle, Dr. 
S. W. Purvis says, in his article on The 
"West End" Circle of St. Martha : "Not 
because of anything she has done, but as 
a -theological labstraction, Mary has been 
canonized. As a simple miatter of justice 
why doesn't som>e great council immor- 
talize Martha? Meanwhile she is the 
unhaloed worker in the strongest arm 
of the modern church — ^the Ladies' Aid 
Society. That excellent organization is 
man's meanness spelled in woman's 
work. When men feel in need of econ- 
omy they think the cutting down ought 
to begin at 'home and the church, instead 
of personal expenses and at the club. 
And 'Sio they chip in two dollars for a 
"Stag" spread at the Elks, and object 
to 'the quarter spent for the Lord. The 
dime they give their wives looks larger 
than the dollar they give to 'the boys.' " 

Perhaps an Elk eats more than a 
woman. # 



"GIVE A JOINT BALL." 

This is the heading of an article in 
The Royal Neighbor, the organ of a 
woman's society claiming relationship 
with the Modern Woodmen. A "heel 
and to'C dance," we seem to have heard 
of ; but what is a joint ball — looking 
again, we find that the M. W. of A. and 
(the R. N. of A. danced "till the wee 
hours of the morning." 

The combined circulation of The 
Modern Woodman — for men — and The 
Royal Neighbor — for women — ^is almosf* 
1,300,000. 



August, 190S. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



99 




JAMES M. GRAY. 

Dean, Moody Bible Institute. 



MORAL AND SPIRITUAL COUNTER^ 
FEITS. 

BY REV. JAMES M. GRAY. 

I have entitled my theme IVloral and 
Spiritual Counterfeits, and if a passage 
of Scripture were selected as an intro- 
duction it would be Paul's wor.ls to the 
Galslians : 

"Though we or an angel from heaven, 
preach any other gospel unto you than that 
which we have preached unto you, let him 
be accursed." 

Satan is a great counterfeiter and the 
prince among them. His business is not 
so much to deny God, as to substitute an- 
other god in the place of the true one. 
We are impressed with this from *he 
very beginning. There was no atheism 



in the Garden of Eden. God was ac- 
knowledged there, only some improve- 
ments were suggested as to His methods 
of dealing with the works of His ov/n 
hands. And so it has been ever since. 
The whole system of paganism was, and 
is a vast coimterfeit. So near alike is it 
in certain particulars to the religion of 
the Eible, that to this day there are those 
who profess to be in doubt as to whether 
it does not owe all the good it has to 
that source, or as to whether the latter 
indeed is not merely a sort of evolution 
from the former. We know better than 
this. We know that paganism and the 
worship of the true God are essentially 
distinct in their origin, their nature. 



100 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



their purpose and their effects. But it 
is no insignificant tribute to the won- 
drous power of the pr.ince of darkness 
that he should have initiated and per- 
petuated a system which has received 
nearly the whole world, and practically 
dethroned its rightful sovereign for a 
period of 6,000 years. 

It is startling beyond anything to ob- 
serve the trail of the serpent in this par- 
ticular throughout the windings of sac- 
red history. Now it is Egyptian sorcer- 
ers doing as marvelous things as Moses. 
Now it is a king of Israel leading the 
whole nation in the worship of golden 
calves. Now it is a Levitical priest- 
hood substituting ceremonies for obed- 
ience, and a fossilized religiousness tith- 
ing the mint and cummin and forsaking 
the matters of the law. In every in- 
stance it is not the denial of God that 
is proposed, but the worship of a false 
god under a pretended representation of 
the true. 

The histor}^ of the establishment of 
Christianity affords an impressive illus- 
tration of the same truth. No sooner 
-does the Lord Jesus Christ begin His 
active ministry among men than Satan 
is at His right hand to assist Him — not 
so much to resist as to counterfeit Him. 
And so well does he succeed that even 
they who should have been the judges 
are unable to discriminate against him, 
and attribute the power of the Holy 
Ghost to the worship of Beelzebub. Philip 
has his Simon Magus, Paul and Barna- 
bas their Elymas, Paul and Silas their 
Pythonic maid. And when these super- 
human works are overborne by divine 
power, and they are no longer able to 
deceive, other methods of counterfeiting 
are employed. The law is sought to be 
engrafted upon the gospel, and the grace 
of God is nullified and perishing souls 
duped by the specious plea that to be 
saved it is necessary to be circumcised. 



The work of the apostles is handicapped 
all the way through by false teachers, 
who privily bring in damnable heresies, 
and through covetousness, by feigned 
v/ords, make merchandise of men. More- 
over, the book of Revelation is a signal 
prophecy that such would continue to 
be true even to the end of the present 
age. The harlot of that book, the mod- 
ern Babylon, the Church of Rome is 
Satan's master counterfeit. For more 
than 1,200 years has he thus had his 
own church in the earth, which by her 
pretentious claims, her splendid wealth 
and her world-wide influence has com- 
peted only too successfully, alas ! with 
the poor and humble, and persecuted 
Church of the Living God. 

Modern spiritualism is a further case 
in point. We are living in the latter 
times when many have departed from 
the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits 
and doctrines of devils. And as in the 
other instances, they claim to be wor- 
shiping and honoring God thereby. To 
be sure they ignore the teachings of the 
Bible, but then they have their temples, 
their oracles and their mighty works. 
And, they name the name of Jesus. And 
they challenge you to prove that they are 
frauds. And the greatest scientific men 
of our generation admit the genuineness 
of much of what they do, and are struck 
dumb with amazement at that which ail 
their knowledge and all their ability can 
not explain. 

We are living in a rationalistic age; 
in a time when human reason is sitting 
upon the throne of faith, and when the 
natural powers of men are being endued 
with the attributes of God. The word of 
God is being denied piece-meal to-day. 
Intellect is being put as a substitute for 
spirituality. Sworn defenders of the 
gospel are ssr-img her leading and 
strongest opponents. All this in the 
name of religion, in the name of God 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



101 



and in the name of Christianity. What 
a counterfeit have we here in the so- 
called ''liberal" preaching and teaching 
of .this day! 

It was with these thoughts and con- 
victions in mind that mv attention was 
turned to the whole subject of Secret 
Societies. I had known something of 
Jesuitism, of Mormonism, of Clan-na- 
Gaelism and the like, and abhorred them. 
But I had known nothing, comparative!}^ 
speaking, of the Lodge System. I had 
known nothing of the underlying prin- 
ciples which sustained it, nothing of its 
history, nothing in any large and gen- 
eral sense of its effects. I was prepared 
to rebuke it for extravagance, for a 
waste of time, for a corruption of mor- 
als in some cases. I was prepared to 
laugh at it for its puerility, and ready 
to antagonize it as an increasing enemy 
to attendance on the hotise of God. But 
I did not dream of very much beyond 
this. The benevolent features of the 
system seemed commendable. Many 
friends fellowshipped it. Brethren in 
the ministry threw the cloak of their 
approval over it. It occurred to me that 
the world and the church to-day might 
be better oft without it, but how much 
better off had never come in my way to 
particularly inquire. Very recently, 
hov/ever, my eyes have been opened on 
the subject. No longer do I see men 
even as trees walking, but believe that 
I can discern the cloven foot all the way 
along quite as clearly in this system as 
in those of other names already refer- 
red to. 

Very recently an opportunity has been 
embraced to read a "Philosophical His- 
tory of Freemasonry and other Secret 
Societies," by Augustus Arnold — not 
the highest original authority I am in- 
formed, but one whose statements are 
sufficiently verified by those who are. 
And the greatest surprise has been ex- 



perienced to perceive the striking simi- 
larity between certain of the postulates 
he presents, and those which underlie 
the other counterfeits to which attention 
has been called. The author takes pride 
in pointing to the early heathen source 
of Masonism for example, and claims 
that the possession of the same rules, 
constitutions, symbols and rites as were 
in vogue in the mysteries of those times 
vvould prove this to be true, even if there 
were no other evidence to the same fact. 
He does not hesitate to say that secret 
societies in general worship not the God 
revealed to us in Scripture, but that 
'Tdeal of a Society which shall represent 
more truly the Christian doctrine of fra- 
ternity." The love of God with Him 
means simply the love of truth, good- 
ness and virtue, a rationalistic, or even 
atheistic conception of the God head 
which one is relieved to say many of his 
Masonic acquaintances would indignant- 
1}^ reject, but which nevertheless stamps 
the order which he especially represents 
as still retaining an essential peculiarity 
of its birth. 

He speaks of these ancient mysteries 
as being in a certain degree the "Ideal 
of a church" ; baptism of candidates is 
spoken of and their reception of a new 
name like unto that mentioned of the 
Christian believer in Revelation, in all 
of which we again see the marks of the 
counterfeiter very plainly. And to this 
day the system counterfeits or usurps 
the place of the Christian church, if our 
author's words are to be received in tes- 
timony, since he makes it appear "the 
refuge of the oppressed," "the educator 
of public and private morals," "the need 
of the world at the present crisis," "and 
the only green spot in the dreary waste 

of Hfe." 

But if it be a church it is very much 
like the harlot of the New Testament. 
What! Any affinity betweea Freema- 



102 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



sonry for example, and Romanism — 
they are antipodes. Not necessarily; it 
is very striking how many points of re- 
semblance there are between them. And 
it would not be at all astonishing, nor 
contrary to precedent, if Satan should 
use both of them for the execution of 
his purposes, by setting one over against 
the other. Observe the following com- 
parisons : If Freemasonry with its sis- 
ter societies is a church, it is first, an in- 
tensely ritualistic church, for it believes 
in symbols, ceremonies and images ra- 
ther than in words, and does not the 
church of Rome ? Secondly, it is a blas- 
phemous and boastful church, for it 
speaks of "the majestic figure of Christ 
as irradiating its portals, "to the exclu- 
sion of the true church which He found- 
ed on the Day of Pentecost, and pur- 
chased with His own blood. "Freema- 
sonry," says our author, "is the truest 
expression of the mind and thought of 
Christ which this age is destined to wit- 
ness." To which he subsequently adds 
the claim that it has done more for the 
civilization of the world and the progress 
of society than all other means com- 
bined — utterances which certainly sug- 
gest "the mouth that spake very great 
things," referred to by the prophet Dan- 
iel, and commonly understood as apply- 
ing to the Church of Rome. It is third- 
ly, a hypocritical or Jesuitical church, 
for it confesses to a concealment of cer- 
tain of its degrees for ulterior ends. The 
nobles of France we are informed were 

induced to take the trowel and gird 
themselves with the apron, seeing in it 
all occasions for diversion and joyous 
banquets, while all the time they were 
covering with their name, and serving 
blindly with their influence, enterprises 
v/hich contemplated the destruction of' 
that ver> nobility of which the> ii^rmed 
a part. Is there any very clear distinc- 
tion between this and that fundamental 



doctrine of the papacy that the end jus- 
tifies the means? It is finally, a hereti- 
cal church, for it seems to believe in. 
purgatory, and in praying to the dead. 
It does teach symbolically at least, that 
the soui passes through various stages 
of discipline from the receptacles of bor- 
row to the Elysian beatitudes of purity, 
and hesitates not to say that in our 
struggles after wisdom, holiness and 
peace we are aided by invoking the vir- 
tues and perfections of the wise and 
holy of past time. Is this very dilterent 
from the worship of Mary and the 
saints ? 

Time forbids any fuller comparison 
between these two systems, which, while 
claiming to be so much opposed to one 
another, are yet so very much aHke. But 
I think that if the Secret Society sys- 
tem be a church, I have made out a case 
that it is a counterfeit church. It may 
look like the church of the Living God, 
but it is not. A counterfeit remember, 
not in the mind and intent of those who 
belong to it, for I do not wish to be a 
slanderer, but in the mind and intent of 
him who originated it, and who holds 
men to its adherence by those subtle so- 
phistries which he knows so well how to 
employ. 

In the foregoing I would not be con- 
sidered personal. I am not attacking 
men. My father was an Odd Fellow, 
my eldest brother a Mason. The former 
died before I ever recognized him, and 
the latter nobly and self-sacrificingly as- 
sumed his place as the protector of and 
provider for the family. If his lodge 
made him what he was, I would be 
loathe to speak against it, and yet it 
would be my duty to do so nevertheless, 
as that which was contrary to the gos- 
pel of the Son of God. I have no con- 
troversy with any Roman Catholic. Ajs 
Toble a Christian act as was ever done 
tow^ard me was that of a Roman Catholic 



August, 1909. 



CHRIS'nAN CYNOSURE. 



103 



relative who claimed to have been con- 
verted in that church, and who treated 
me a's he did from the promptings of 
Christian love. But shall I close my eyes 
and seal my lips to the false teachings 
of the papacy on that account? Friends 
have 1 among the spiritualists, whose do- 
mestic virtues and consistent moral life 
so far as known to me, demand my ad- 
miration, but shall I say that spiritualism 
is of the Bible for that reason? It is 
generally adniitted that many of these 
''New Departure" men, the ''Higher 
Critics" and Nealogians of our time are 
amiable and attractive in their disposi- 
tions, desirable to be acquainted with 
because of their intellectual acumen, their 
social qualities and all that, but is ra- 
tionalism to be commended therefor, and 
the point yielded as to the inspiration 
and authority of the revealed Word? 

I do not know that I shall change the 
mind of any member of a lodge by any- 
thing I have now said. But I may hope 
to be instrumental in saving some young 
man from being entangled in what I 
cannot but consider a delusion. I would 
plead with him to beware of that whole 
svstem as I would with reference to 
any other of the moral and spiritual 
counterfeits herein enumerated, and for 
practically the same reasons. It is con- 
trary to the Word of God. It is dishon- 
oring to Jesus Christ. It is hurtful to 
the highest interests of the soul. It has 
the stamp of the dragon upon it. "Come 
out from among them and be ye sepa- 
rate." — 2 Cor. 6:17. "To the law and to 
the testimony, if they speak not accord- 
ing to this word it is because there is no 
light in them." — Isaiah 8:20. "Though 
he, or an angel from heaven, preach any 
other gospel unto you than that which 
we have preached unto you, let him be 
accursed." — Gal. i :8. 

Confirmation. 

[The author of this testimony is a Bishop 



in the Reformed Episcopal Church, and Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics in Claflin University. 
— James M. Gray.] 

, Orangeburg, S. C, Jan. 19, 1893. 
My Dear Brother : 

Just read your "Moral and Spiritual 
Counterfeits.'' You are perfectly right. 
When a young man I was a Mason and 
as Master of a Lodge used to make my 
lectures as Christian as possible. I never 
thought or heard of Masonry as derived 
from heathen sources. When I entered 
the ministry and sought to lead men to 
Christ, I became satisfied that Masonry 
lulled many a conscience with its moral- 
ity and teachings about God, and de- 
ceived them with the thought, that a 
good Mason was as good a Christian 
and the profession of Christ in the 
church was therefore unnecessary. I 
gave it up and have not entered a lodge 
for over thirty years. 

Yours fraternally, 

P. F. STEVENS. 



"O, dear Lord, increase our love for 
Thee and for one another, so that the 
keeping of Thy commandments may 
grow easy for us, because, with our 
hearts full of love, we will not desire to 
do such things as will grieve Thee, or 
bring unhappiness to anyone with whom 
we are thrown. Help us each day to 
try more earnestly to be true Christian 
children." 



The crown must be won for heaven, 
dear. 
In the battlefield of life; 
My child, though thy foes arc strong 
and tried. 
He lovcth the weak and small ; 
The angels of heaven are on thy side 
And God is over all. 

— Adelaide A. Proctor. 



Ah ! what would the world be to us 
If the children were no more? 

We should dread the desert behind us 
Worse than the dark before. 
— Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 



104 



(JHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 




H. H. GEORGE, 

Secretary, National Reform Association. 
• REMARKS AT ANNUAL MEETING. 

BY H. H. GEORGE, D. D. 

Passing objections not a few to the 
cause of secrecy, I am always most 
deeply grieved and even horrified at their 
antagonism to Christ. With enough of 
religion in their system to seem to be 
religious, when it suits the occasion, and 
little enough to be no religion at all, 
when tliey have to do with people that 
have no religion and want none, they are 
Mohammedans among Mohammedans ; 
Jews among Jews, and would be Chris- 
tians among Christians. But the one that 
this hurts and harms, denies and de- 
thrones, dishonors and crucifies, is the 
blessed Christ, who alone is the Saviour 
of men : than Whose there is no other 
name under heaven nor among men 
whereby they may be saved, and who 
will not give His glory to another. 

These societies are not only un-Chris- 
tian, but they are anti-Christian. They 
rob Him of His glory from the time 
they deliberately cut His name out of 
their platform, initiate their members by 
Christless ceremonies and in every step 
of their administration, till they hide 
that member's lifeless body in the grave 
bv Christless ceremonies. 

While the injunction above the door 



of Christianity is, "Whatsoever ye do, 
in word and deed, do all in the name of 
the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to the 
Father by Him," Masonry repudiates 
that name entirely. It does nothing in 
the name of Christ. When it prays it 
prays without a Christ, although prayer 
without Christ is mockery if not blas- 
phemy. When it uses the Bible, it is the 
Bible with the name of Christ cut out. 
When Masons plan and plot and counsel 
in the lodge they never ask nor seek nor 
want any light from Christ. He is not 
in all their thoughts. When they give 
what they call charity, it is not Christian 
charity, it is lodge charity. It is not 
in the name of Christ, only in the name 
of the lodge. There is no honor done 
to Christ in all their loud sounding alms, 
it is all glory done to the lodge. Thus 
you see instead of doing all things in 
the name of Christ, they do all things 
out of the name of Christ. It is most 
amazing to me that such facts as these 
do not freeze the words upon the lips of 
a minister, who proposes to preach Christ 
when he advocates and bolsters up the 
lodge. In all charity it can only be that 
he defends the lodge because he cannot 
see these facts. And it is still more 
amazing that he is so blinded that he 
cannot see them. 

Every dollar the church member pays 
into the lodge he saps the church of so 
much strength. He cripples the church 
of so much usefulness, and he dishonors 
the church by attempting to make a con- 
cord between Christ and Belial. 

Another feature of this un-Christian 
character is their opposition to those who 
oppose them, and especially their fury 
and rage against all who have separated 
from them. While Christianity says 
"Love your enemies, bless them that 
curse you, do good to them that hate 
you," etc.. Masonic morals is to hurt, 
mob, persecute and ruin in every pos- 
sible way a member who has gotten his 
eyes open to the evil, comes out and 
testifies against them, swearing a man 
at the beginning to what he does not 
know, and later cannot believe, heaping 
oaths with shocking penalties upon every 
one that does not hold to the dictum 
"to ever conceal and never reveal." When 
a mian, who has any conscience, gets his 



Aiigust, 1909. 



OHKISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



105 



eyes open to the folly and wickedness, 
and comes out and renounces the every 
step lie has ever taken with them (which 
every man has a right to do : to renounce 
his oath, confess the sin of it before God, 
turn from it and turn away), then it 
is they hound him to destruction. It is 
a tremendous mistake in morals that a 
man shall keep a wicked oath, to keep on 
doing a wicked thing because he was 
bound by man to do it. No, a thous- 
and times no. A wicked oath has no 
force. It is a sin to take it, and it is 
a duty to break it and repent before God 
for ever having taken it. 

Was Herod's oath to that foolish, 
dancing daughter of Ilerodias to give 
her half the kingdom, binding when 
she asked the head of John the Baptist. 
Not for one moment. Should he com- 
mit atrocious murder because of a fool- 
ish oadi ^^^ No, his duty was to break 
that oath, confess his sin to God and 
spare the life of John the Baptist. So 
with everv other such oath. It is wicked 
to take such oaths and more wicked to 
keep them. An oath that binds to sin 
ought never to be kept. So that the 
persecutions that follow the renunciation 
of the Mason's oath, are cruel and bar- 
barous — of a kin to the course of Abdul 
Hamid, who recently made Turkish cities 
run with blood. 

The voice uttered against secrecy is 
-too often like the arousement of a wild 
beast. Even down to labor unions. If 
a man will not dance to their piping — 
if he will stay out from under their 
hands and mind his own business, they 
will use any means to keep him from em- 
ployment. If he thinks best to work 
when they say no, his life and property 
are often put in jeopardy. It is hard 
to sec how the devil could devise a sys- 
tem more antagonistic to Christ from 
corner to capstone; apparently friendly 
to such as put themselves under its yoke, 
but relentless in their persecutions even 
to the death of such as move their 
tongues against them. But the Lord in 
His time will sweep them from the earth, 
for this earth is too little to hold per- 
manently anything, man, organization, 
institution of society or nationality that 
will refuse to own Christ and come into 
obedience to His will. 



THE BIBLE AND SECRET SOCIETIES. 

BY PRES. C. x\. BLANCHARD. 

Dear Friends and Brethren — I receiv- 
ed a short time since a letter from a 
friend in Arkansas who asked me to 
give him the scriptural arguments 
againt the lodges. 

This is an old topic and has been dealt 
with in these columns by myself and 
others a great many times. Neverthe- 
less, it is an all-important topic, for the 
relation of any system to the person 
and work of Jesus Christ is the deter- 
mining thing respecting that system or 
person. 

I therefore submit to you the reply 
I sent to diim. Possibly it may be of 
some value to you in your thinking, in 
your labors, with your neighbors and 
friends. I shall be glad if God makes 
it of service to some of you, as I fully 
expect Him to do. The reply after the 
salutation was as follows : 

'T thank you for your note. The 
whole Bible shows that God is light; 
that His people are light; that sin is 
darkness and leads to darkness, and that 
the head of fhe kingdom of evil in 
this world is Satan, the prince of dark- 
ness. 

"Secrecy is a real or pretended, suc- 
cessful or unsuccessful attempt to keep 
things in darkness. The rituals of the 
orders are not the secrets of the orders, 
properly speaking. They, the secrets, 
are the things which are done and said 
in the lodge rooms and among the lodge 
members under cover of the oath. This 
list of things runs the whole scale from 
simple follies and nonsense to the most 
horrible crimes known to law, human 
and divine. 

"Persons who become lodge folk and 
who have been decently raised, especial- 
ly if they have some sort of Christian 
hope, do not mean any harm, and if 
they are not spiritually minded, do not 
see that there is any. Nevertheless, the 
whole system is downward in its trend. 
A few little secrets at first, intimacies 
that are occasioned by the lodge rela- 
tions, association with bad people, lead- 
ing on the evil comnuuiications of one 
kind or another, and j^retty soon you 
■have fornication, adultery, murder, no- 
body can fell what. It is a pitiful thing 



106 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



to watch this procession for a while and 
see the corruptions which are produced, 
and especially to see the blind religious 
teadhers, who give their moral support 
to this system of darkness which orig- 
inated in the pit and will end in the 
pit. 

''So much for the general system ; now 
as to the Scriptures. I John i \y : 'If 
we walk in the light as He is in the 
lig'ht, we have fellowship one with an- 
other, and the blood of Jesus Christ His 
Son cleanseth us from all sin.' I John 
2 :22 : 'Who is la liar but he that denieth 
tihat Jesus is the Christ? He is anti- 
Ohrist that denieth the Father and the 
Son.' Many lodge men do not know 
that they are denying Christ, yet as 
■soon as they come to seardh into the 
facts, they find fhis is true. They talk 
about God and doing rigtht, but they, 
speaking generally, entirely omit Jesus 
Christ, and they state the reason why 
they do it. They say that there are Jews 
and other persons who do not believe in 
Christ, who are good people, and who 
ought to be received into their lodges; 
that these men would not come if they 
had to confess faith in Jesus, so they 
leave Him out. This definitely decides 
the character of the lodge movement. It 
denies Jesus and therefore has not the 
Father, and it denies Him for the sake 
of getting in His enemies, people who 
do not believe in Him and will not con- 
fess Him. 

''Matt. 5:14-16: 'Ye are the light of 
the world.' If we are Christian peo- 
ple, we are born of God and have His 
nature. We are actually kin to Jesus 
Christ, and we shall do the way He 
did. The effect of our living will be 
like the effect of His living. Only in 
the measure that this is true can we 
dare call ourselves Christians at all. 
W'hy should any man call himself a 
Christian if he does not live the way 
Jesus Christ did? It is true we come 
short but, nevertheless, it remains that if 
we do not live the life of Jesus Christ 
in some measure, we do not belong to 
Him, and if we profess that we do, we 
are simply Hars and hypocrites. 

"John 18:20, Jesus said: 'I spake 
openly to the world . . . and in se- 
cret have I said nothing.' And repeat- 
edly He says that He has given us an 



example that we should do the way He 
did. Now how can I as a Christian 
man yoke up with godless and unbeliev- 
ing people in secret lodges and pretend 
to be following the example of Jesus 
Christ ? We know that He was never in 
any such organizations ; He declares this 
Himself. If one should afiirm the con- 
tradictory, he would make Jesus Christ 
a liar. 

"I mention a single Scripture further, 
II Cor. 6:14-18. Here the law is laid 
down as plainly as it could be in the 
English language. Our fraternal asso- 
ciations and fellowships, if we are Chris- 
tian people, are to be with Chris- 
tians. If we are intimately associated 
vv'ith godless people in worldly affairs, 
we shall become like them as sure as 
two and two make four. This has been 
proved in the experience of tens of thou- 
sands of men. There are literally tens 
£>f thousands of people to-day who used 
to be professed Christians who are now 
aHen from the church, alien from God, 
prayerless, many of them, as well as un- 
believing, because they were unequally 
yoked with people who had no faith in 
God. No man who cares for his soul 
or for the souls of other people ought 
to be for an hour yoked up with these 
lodges. A minister who joined three of 
them not very long ago, said to me: 
'Yoiu are perfectly right aboiit these 
lodges. I joined three of them, with, I 
think, fairly good motives, but I found 
in every instance that they were hurt- 
ing mc, and that I was not doing them 
any good.' 

"The Lord bless you and build you up 
in iholy faith and strengthen you for the 
battle." 

I feel like adding a single word, not 
on this particular subject, but on the 
reason for faith and courage in out 
work. As far as I am able to compre- 
'hend the situation, public sentiment is 
changing respecting the secret society 
movement as rapidly as it is on any 
one subject now before the people. For 
so many states, courts and boards of 
education to take action adverse to se- 
cret societies as have done so during 
the past three years seems to me noth- 
ing short of a miracle. Now when God 
grants us a reward. He intends it for 
an encouragement. A promise fulfilled, 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



107 



is an inspiration to duty. We oug'ht not 
to be asleep when God is showing His 
disposition to bless our work. By day 
and night, in street cars, steam cars, 
walks by the way, prayer meetings, pub- 
lic addresses, local newspapers, and gen- 
eral publications, we ought to be kindly 
but persistently urging folks to come 
out of secret societies and identify them- 
selves with the Kingdom of God. If 
we do this, we are sure of reward. 

You will perhaps pardon a personal 
word. I have myself been very ill and 
God has said to me, ''Come apart and 
rest awhile," so I shall not be privileged 
to be so active in this good work for 
a time as I have sometimes been, but I 
wish you all to understand that as I 
look back over the years of labor, I 
find nothing to regret in my service for 
this cause except that I have not been 
able to accomplish more for it. If I 
had been more humble, more consecrat- 
ed, more prayerful, I am sure God would 
have used me more than He has, but for 
what He has done, for the s-hare He has 
permitted me in the struggle for 
rig'hteousness, I am grateful. 

W'heatO'n College, July, 1909. 



WOMAN'S ORGANIZATIONS. 



Their Relation to the Religious Life of 
the Church. 

BY :MRS. N. E. KELLOGG. 

This is an age of great undertakings, 
vast financial schemes, magnificent enter- 
prises, and these can be successfully car- 
ried out only by organized effort. 

The cry 'Taddle 3^our own canoe," *'if 
you want anything done, do it," '*'put thy 
shoulder to the wheel and the gods will 
hel]) thee," all this has given place to 
sucli maxims as 'Tn union there is 
strength," ''Two are better than one" 
and "A three-fold cord is not quickly 
broken." 

The self-valiant spirit, or shall I say 
the simple reliance upon God, which en- 
abled our fathers with cool courage and 
confidence to undertake and by His grace 
to accomplish the impossible, seems fast 
]">assing away. The word hns i?fone out 
"organize, oriranize, ORGANIZE." and 
lo, men. women and children respond to 
the call. 




MRS. N. E. KELLOGG. 

As we contemplate the moral condition 
about us it seems as if the awful scene 
described in the Apocalypse were pass- 
ing before us. The fifth Angel has 
sounded, the bottomless pit is opened, 
and, from its yawning depths arises a 
smoke so dense that "the sun and air 
are darkened." And out of the smoke 
come locusts, (living organisms) upon 
the earth, societies, clubs, lodges, liter- 
ary and business, sporting, religious, 
missionary, for young and old ; more 
than can be numbered, literally "the air 
is full of them," and the revelator adds, 
"unto them was given power." Ah, pow- 
er, does not the imiversal desire for this 
explain the almost universal spread of 
these organizations? 

The first president of Wheaton Col- 
lege who so strongly and so blessedly 
helped to build public opinion in his 
day. used to say to his students : "What- 
ever brings men together in masses, if 
it does not elevate, degrades them." 

In Christ Jesus (Gal. .V-*^). there is 
neither man nor woman. He looks down 
upon us and sees in every one a human 
soul "launched upon the sea of time, 
whose destined port is eternity of bliss 
or woe." 

But our sn1)iect confines us to Wom- 
an's organizations, and of these the 
church may truly say in the words of 



108 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



her Lord, ''He that is not with Me is 
against Me." Every sincere attempt to 
resist sin, or to help others, necessitates 
prayer and reA^ves the church. 

Woman's organizations as a whole 
may be easily divided into three classes : 
Literary societies, secret lodges, and or- 
ganizations of women for benevolent 
and Christian work, according to the 
special occasion or need which caused 
their formation. 

The many literary, study or history 
clubs as they are variously called, were 
a result of the felt need of pleasant so- 
cial intercourse and study, by women 
whose home cares and duties did not re- 
quire their whole time and strength. 
From such a meeting we would suppose 
she might return to her children or her 
routine of work, stimulated in mind and 
refreshed in body. 

It is with reluctance that we speak of 
woman's secret lodges, but "their name 
is legion," they profess to have hundreds 
of thousands of members (and we do 
not doubt their claim), and they handle 
an immense amount of money which is 
either helping or hindering the cause of 
Christ in the worJd. 

Woman's Secret Organizations. 

Of the more than a hundred woman's 
secret lodges. I will refer verv briefly to 
tliree. The O. E. S., or Order of 'the 
P>astern Star, sometimes called female 
Freemasonry : the Rebekah degree of 
Odd Fellowship, and the Royal Neigh- 
bors of America. Let us consider for a 
moment the membership and obligations 
of those orders and their moral effect 
upon the church. 

The persons entitled to receive the 
five degrees of the Order of Eastern 
Star are all Master Masons in good 
standing, their wives, sisters, mothers, 
and the widows of Master A^Casons who 
died in good standing. 

The opening ode sung at the initiatory 
ceremonies is as follows : 

"Here around the altar meeting, 

Where the sons of light combine; 
Mingled with our friendly greeting, 

Is the glow of love divine; 
For this Hall to virtue given, 

And our emblems on the wall, 
Point us to the Lodge in Heaven, 

And the Master of us all. 



"Chorus. 
"Keep in view the Lodge supernal, 

Life is love enthroned in heaven, 
Where the true light never wavers, 
And our mortal sins forgiven. 

"In the bonds of Mason's duty. 

Seek we now the Mason's light, 
Forms of Wisdom, Strength and Beauty 

Teach us what is good and right; 
Far be every sinful passion. 

Near be every gentle grace; 
And so at last this holy mission 

Shall reveal our Master's face." 

After a long preliminary address in 
regard to the reasons for the order, the 
instructor says to the candidates before 
him : "A lady who makes us a pledge 
of honor, such as I require of you, 
pledges her very soul ; the honor of a 
woman is more to her than life itself," 
and then reads these words which form 
a part of the obligation, which is too 
long to be given entire : 

Obligation. 

"Ladies, you, each of you, in the presence of" 
Almighty God and these witnesses, do pledge 
the sacred honor of a woman * * * to the 
faithful performance of the conditions of 
the following obligation: That you will not 
be present nor assist in conferring these de- 
grees on any man not Masonically known 
to you to be a Master Mason, nor any ladj^ 
not vouched for by a Master Mason as being 
the wife, widow, sister, mother, or daugh- 
ter of a Mason." The candidates assent by 
raising their right hand. 

The candidates assent by raising their- 
right hand. 

The persons eligible to membership in 
a Rebekah's lodge are: ^'All Odd Fel- 
lows in good standing, and their wives 
(provided the wife is a white woman), 
and all unmarried white women who 
have attained the age of eighteen years, 
who believe in a Supreme Intelligent 
Creator and Ruler of the Universe, and 
v>"ho are of good moral character." 

After various preliminaries are gone 
through with, the candidate is conducted 
to the altar, upon which lies an open 
Bible. The Vice-Grand says : 

Vice Grand. (To candidate.) Place your^ 
right hand upon the Bible and repeat after 
me: 

I, , in the presence of the members 

of the Rebekah Degree of the Independent 
Order of Oddfellows here assembled, do> 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



109 



solemnly promise that I will never reveal 
to anyone the Mysteries of this Degree, or 
the Passwords and Signs belonging to it, 
and now about to be intrusted to me, ex- 
cept to a member of this Degree, whom I 
may find, on due trial, to be in possession 
of them, or when in the discharge of official 
duties within the Lodge. * * * To all se- 
crecy and obedience in this respect, I here- 
by pledge my sacred word of honor, without 
any mental reservation, and with a fuU de- 
termination to preserve my plighted faith 
inviolate until the end of life. 

The Royal Neighbors of America is 
the auxihary branch of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. Perhaps the larg- 
est fraternal insurance in the world. 

The obHgation of "secrecy" is taken 
with the right hand on the open Bible 
and in this position the candidate says : 
'T will forever hold the interest of this 
order as sacred as t'hose of my own 
household." 

]n all these degrees frequent refer- 
ence is made to Bible characters, pray- 
ers are offered occasionally and a wo- 
man goes home from a secret meeting 
where s'he has listened to a confused 
mixture of things sacred and profane, 
obHgated to share with men of a supe- 
rior lodge secrets which she may never 
disclose to her husband, father or moth- 
er, unless perchance, they have been 
snared in the same net. 

A few shrewd schemers seeking to get 
an undue advantage over others, offer to 
weak women, as Satan did in the gar- 
den — knowledge and greatness, and often 
with little care or prayer for guidance 
a crowd 'hastens to combine and at once 
each one loses her individual moral char- 
acter and becomes a part of a helpless 
unit, in a vast institution which she can 
neither change nor resist, and dares not 
leave. The membership of these secret 
orders is as a rule eonfined by constitu- 
tion to white women; why is it that, 
when these societies have entertainments, 
t'hey so often blacken their faces an'd 
act the minstrels' part? They require 
the candidate to be of good moral char- 
acter, but after belo'Uging to the lodge 
a little while many of them spend whole 
nights in promiscuous dancing and feast- 
ing with men who love such things. 

O, fhat these men who join secret 
lodges for insurance might see that they 



barter their birthright for a mess of 
pottage ! O, tliat some prophet might 
tell them that ''God is able to give them 
much more" than the lodge ever can ! 
O, that these women might be warned 
that they risk their eternal soul when 
they refuse to follow the blessed exam- 
ple of Him who in ''secret said nothing" 
and who commanded His followers to let 
their light shine. 

But let us turn from such deeds of 
darkness which directly tend to sin and 
shame, to think of things "pure, lovely 
and of good report." How different 
from these in work and aim is that or- 
ganization of women started within the 
memory of many of us, open to every 
Christian woman, world-wide in its oper- 
ation, and eternal in its benefieial results. 
A society which by strengthening the 
moral character and opposing every 
form of sin greatly aids the Church. 

It is scarce forty years, since God laid 
his hand upon Frances E. Willard and 
thrust her forward to be a leader in the 
tremendous struggle which still rages 
]>etween the demon of drink and the 
forces of temperance. 

The W. C. T. U. was started in a 
newspaper office in Chicago by a few 
earnest women. Soon a State Union 
was formed, then the National, and be- 
fore the work was done Miss Willard 
was president of the World's Union 
which is now the largest woman's society 
in existence. 

Little did she think when with shrink- 
ing heart she stepped forward to make 
her first plea against the mighty evil, 
that her clear, sweet voice would rise 
above the clamor, din and strife, and by 
the Grace of God "command peace !" 

Her only loved brother was, against 
the prayers and tears and pleadings of 
his loved ones, in spite of his own awful 
struggles when sober, destroyed by drink. 
Only this bitter sorrow could fire her 
zeal and rouse her indignation to such 
a pitch as to relinquish the life of ele- 
gance and selfish ease which so many 
strive for, and which she might so easily 
have attained. 

She left no child to rise up and call 
her blessed, but nations bless her mem- 
ory; and if she is among the "great 
cloud of witnesses" which look down 



no 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



from heaven and mark our progress in 
the heavenly race, methinks s'he smiles 
as she sees the states of her loved na- 
tive land one after another forbidding 
the accursed traffic, and all the civilized 
nations of the world actively engaged in 
conflict with this mighty evil. 

Woman's Board of Foreign Missions. 

There is one more society which ever 
strives to keep "step with the Master" 
who says 'follow Me' and who never re- 
treats. "God has seen fit to leave the 
Christianization of the world in the 
hands of men." 

A little more than one hundred years 
ago there was a great revival in mis- 
sionary eftort. The American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions was 
founded. Stirring Missionary hymns 
were written, Judson, Newell, Carey, and 
others were sent into foreign lands to 
preach Christ. 

A/Juch heroic work was done, and 
martyr blood was spilt. In a single gen- 
eration whole islands and groups of isl- 
ands turned to the Lord, as it were, "A 
nation in a day." 

Still there seemed a lack of forces, 
''Divine compassio'n works through hu- 
man hearts and hands" and ithere were 
places where men could go; there was 
a work which seemed to be "Woman's 
work for women and children" and in 
1868 with much prayer and great foy 
was formed "The Woman's Board for 
Foreign Missions." Its object as stated 
in its certificate of organization is : To 
engage the earnest and systematic co- 
operation of Christian women in sending 
out and supporting women as missioua- 
ries, native teachers and Bible readers 
to wo'men in foreign lands ; establishing 
schools, orphanages, ho'spitals and other 
institutions ; to educate, support and 
Christianize women and children in 
heathen countries ; in fact, their work 
was what Jesus said was His work, "to 
seek and to save the lost." This world- 
wide work of women for woman, is still 
in its infancy; yet the account of what 
has been accomplished reads like a fairy 
tale. Not without "the days of labor, 
and the nights of prayer;'.' noit without 
tears and suffering and the martyr's 
death ; but day and night as silently and 
as irresistibly as the tide, God has 



wrought with the instruments placed at 
his disposal. 

The National Woman's Board for For- 
eign Missions was divided into 
"Branches" so as to work unitedly yet 
quickly and efficiently. And the women 
of each separate church in our land form 
a vein or artery ito carry from the in- 
dividual woman the life giving word of 
God, stored up in word of testimony or 
prayer or consecrated money. 

The multitude of foreigners now 
thronging our sihores together with the 
means of transit and communication has 
made Missions one comprehensive term, 
and mnch foreign work is now done, on 
home ground. 

The National Foreign Board was 
quickly followed by the more perfect or- 
ganization of the Home Societies. 

Hardly ihad the smoke of battle roll- 
ed away, before our Philippine posses- 
sions became an out-station of the Home 
field. In far Alaska — \Vherever our flag 
goes, the 'home missionary goes to lift 
up Christ that He may "draw" all men 
unto Him. 

One great factor in the efficiency of 
a Missionary Society is the enlisting of 
every member in active work. 

A Word to Individual Woman. 

Good programs must be prepared with 
prayer and care. Those who can write 
papers or Bible readings on systematic 
and proportionate giving are very im- 
portant. The idea of buying something 
for ourselves in order to help along 
Christian work must give place to the 
nobler purpose of King David : "Neith- 
er will I ofifer to God in sacrifice 
that which costs nothing." These So- 
cieties may be God's lever with which 
to raise the Church to this "more excel- 
lent way." 

A/[issionary tracts left in book -racks 
or where they will attract attention are 
a great help, and one who could not be 
persuaded to collect funds or prepare 
a paper would gladly do this service, in 
the home, church, ischool, everywhere. 

Children must be enlisted in Church 
life, temperance and missionary societies. 
But the one thing essential to the great- 
est usefulness of woman's organiza- 
tions, is prayer. Not what only the 
learned or wealthy or talented may do, 



August, 1909. 



OHiUSTlAN CYNOSURE. 



Ill 



but the service which young, old, rich, 
poor, any child of God may render. 
Prayer ! 

A human being, man or woman, if 
wholly consecrated to God and yielded 
to His guidance, is like a blazing torch 
held aloft in the dark forest to guide 
and cheer the lost; or like the light 
whose friendly ray enables the storm- 
tossed mariner t'O Teach port in safety. 
But let us not forget that however bril- 
liant the talents of an individual may 
be, all the other light than that which 
comes to m-an through fhe Word of God, 
by the operation of His Holy Spirit, is 
like Dhe mirage over ;the swamp, or the 
phosphorescent light in the dim woods, 
a lure to death or a token of decay. 

And women may well say, in view 
of what God has done through their in- 
strumentality, ''Not unto us, O Lord, not 
unto us; but 'unto Thy name give glory 
for Thy mercy and for Thy truth's sake." 
■ Wiieaton, 111. 



Slumber not in the tents of your fa- 
thers. The world is advancing; advance 
with it. — Mazzini. 



True happiness consists not in the 
multitude of friends, but in their worth 
and choice. — Ben Jonson. 



Greenville, Tenn. 
Mr. Phillips : 

Dear Sir — You have my prayers and 
deep felt sympathy for the National 
Christian Association. Let tis keep the 
good cause going at any cost. The As- 
sociation is a necessary adjunct to the 
Christian church and the Cynosure oc- 
cupies a felt necessity in Christian liter- 
ature. 

We need workers and literature in 
Tennessee so much. Secret orders are 
a craze among the people. 

Yours truly, 
Rev. W. S. Bandy. 



"An editor in Kankakee, 

Enraged, and in a burning passion 
With a vexatious rival, he 

Wrote him a letter in this fashion. 
'You are an ass uncouth and rude. 
And will be one eternally.' 
Then, in an absent minded mood, 
He signed it : 'Yours fraternally.' " 




G. A. PEGRAM. 



ANALYSIS OF LODGE OATHS. 

By Rev. G. A. Pegram. 

Every human organization pleads one 
or more excuses or reasons for its ex- 
istence. In Christian lands everyone 
wants a scriptural reason. Lodges also 
insist on keeping up this custom. So 
most lodge men claim that their lodge is 
founded on the Bible. But quoting script- 
ure in the lodgeroom, or in support of 
the lodge, does not make the lodge 
scriptural. Mere assertions settle no dif- 
ficulty. To ascertain whetlier any insti- 
tution is scriptural or unscriptural, the 
principles and practices of such institu- 
tions must be compared with those of 
scripture. 

The very essence of all lodgery is the 
secret obligation. In answer to the ques- 
tion, "W'hat makes you a Mason?" the 
Mason is taught to answer, "My obliga- 
tion." This is repeated in substance in 
each of the first three degrees. \\'hat 
makes you an Entered Apprentice, Fel- 
low Craft, or Master Mason ?" "My ob- 
ligation." The obligation makes a Ma- 
son, and the obligation is the oath. Then 
if the oath is the essence of Masonry, 
and everything else about the lodge was 
scriptural, while the oath itself was un- 



112 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



scriptural, the moral quality of the oath 
would decid-e the moral status of the 
lodge. 

It is very noticeable that but little, if 
any. Scripture is quoted in the oaths of 
any lodge. Moreover the nature of the 
lodge oath decides the nature of the 
lodge itself. If the oath is strict, the 
lodge is strict; if the oath is mild, the 
lo'fl'ge is mild. And every lodge is cruel 
and barbarous in proportion to the cruel- 
ty and barbarity of its oaths. - So we see 
S: tl^at the oath is not only the index of the 
Jf character of the lodge, but also a gauge 
'■ of; its characteristics, too. 

iLet it be remembered, too, that nearly 
all'lodgemen consider their lodge obli- 
gation as having the nature of an oath, 
no riiatter whether it is in the form of a 
vow, pledge, promise or an oath. To 
them they all mean the same thing. 
Moreover the pledge is often called an 
oath in the^ lecture following the obliga- 
tion. For example, see the Knights of 
Pythias pledge. Furthermore, most 
lodge men insist that their lodge obliga- 
tions are oaths when they are defending 
their sacred or binding character, even 
when it is in the form of a simple pledge 
or promise. 

The oaths or obligations of all lodges 
are made up of four points, namely : 
secrecy, obedience, partiality, and penal- 
ty. The penalty is not always expressed. 
But if not, it is always implied or sug- 
gested in the oath or in the lecture fol- 
lowing the oath. 

Secrecy. 
As every one knows, every lodge mem- 
ber is sworn to observe absolute secrecy 
in regard to the oaths, intitiation, grips, 
signs, passwords, any work done in the 
lodge, and the confidential communica- 
tions of all its members. The initiate 
not only swears to absolute secrecy in 
regard to all the essentials of Masonry, 
but lie^ swears to it while it is still hid- 
den from him. No sensible man or wom- 
an would do business in that way. Who 
would buy goods, stock, houses, farms or 
anything else, without seeing them? 
Who makes contracts, signs papers, or 
makes promises to any thing without first 
learning all Ibe can about them? Yet 
that is the only way you can buy ma- 
sonry, or lod'gery of any kind. More- 



over, secrecy is considered the most im- 
portant part of the obHgation. 

It is so important and prominent that 
this whole class of institutions is named 
after this single characteristic — secret so- 
cieties. It is not only because this ele- 
ment of secrecy differentiates this class 
of organizations from others, but also 
because this characteristic of dubbing 
them, ''Obedient" or ''Loyal Societies.'' 

"Secrecy, silence, and safety" are not 
only the jewels of Masonry, but its 
motto as well. Every man is advised 
not to sign a written instrument of any 
kind until he reads and understands it. 
In failing to observe this caution, many 
a man has been swindled out of hard- 
earned cash. To the honest man, safety 
is found only in light and publicity. The 
safety of none but criminals depends 
upon "secrecy and silence." 

The greatest change which lodgery 
makes in the conduct oi its members is 
not in regard to morality, but in regard 
to secrecy. Its influence is the first felt, 
and also the last. The obligation to se- 
crecy is kept almost universally, whether 
the other points are or not. And in the 
renunciation of one's lodge, this is al- 
ways the lasit point to be yielded. 

Lodge men do not object so much to 
their members dropping out of the lodge, 
especially if such members are poor (in 
some instances the lodge will give them 
a permission, in others an expressed in- 
vitation to do so), but one thing is al- 
ways insisted upon, in both adhering 
members and seceders, and that is the 
constancy and inviolability o>f the oath of 
secrecy. This is what is meant by the 
oft-repeated, and very significant phrase, 
"Once a Mason, always a Mason." 

Lodge men cease rendering strict 
obedience to the decrees of the lodge, or 
to the mandates of their superior officers 
(such are sometimes heard to declare 
with evident pride that they acted inde- 
pendent of, and contrary to, both the 
lodge and its officers) ; for doing this 
neither they nor the Todge seem to think 
they are violating their oaths, and no- 
body calls them "perjured villains" for 
it ! But many who renounce the lodge, 
or cease obedience still faithfully keep 
their obligation of secrecy. 

It is strange, too, that the spirit and 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



113 



teaching of the lodge is such that the 
oath of secrecy is about the only one 
which has an abiding influence on the 
members. The very thing for which the 
lodge is professed to have been organ- 
ized, and still to exist, seems to be final- 
ly and completely forgotten. Whoever 
heard of any seceder being dubbed ''a 
perjured villain" for violating his obliga- 
tion to benevolence, patriotism, or tem- 
perance? Yet these are considered the 
cardinal principles of various secret so- 
cieties, and for the inculcation and prac- 
tice of which they alone exist. Now if 
they insist on the permanent practice of 
any principle, why don't they insist on 
the one for w'hose inculcation and prac- 
tice alone they profess to exist ? By such 
glaring inconsistency, they brand their 
own pretensions as hypocrisy and fraud. 

It is very evident, too, t'hat the princi- 
ple emphasized and advertised to the 
outside world is not the one emphasized 
and inculcated in the lodge room. The 
goods displayed in the lodge window and 
show-case are not the same kind kept in 
stock on the shelves. The samples are 
all rig'ht. Nobody objects to them. But 
we do object to the fraud of giving to 
the purchasers goods entirely different 
from the samples ordered from, and then 
condemning him as a ''perjured villain'' 
because he refuses to take the goods 
simply because they were not the goods 
he ordered. In common business life 
such an agent or merchant would be 
dubbed a rascal, or scoundrel, but in this 
case it is entirely different. Nothing 
else, or less, than ''a noble order'' suf- 
fices. "Woe unto them that call evil 
good, and good evil ; that put darkness 
for light, and light for darkness ; t'hat 
put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bit- 
ter!" Isa. 5 :20. 

The fact is, lodges seem to be obtain- 
ing both money and members under 
false pretenses, a state's prison offense. 
If other institutions or men were guilty 
of such fraud they would probably be 
prosecuted and punished to the full ex- 
tent of the law. But this is condoned and 
protected. Instead of punishing the 
fraud and putting him in prison, they 
hold the defrauded in the prison of a 
slavish and so-called obligation, under 
the fear of penalty and j>ersecution. 



Moreover the common principles of so- 
ciety and state are violated in the fact 
that the innocent and defrauded is 
turned over to the custody of the crim- 
inal and fraud to persecute and punish 
even unto death, should such an innocent 
prisoner insist upon honesty or fairness. 
More still, ''don't you dare to say a word 
about us defrauding you, or we will down 
you in this world, and damn you in the 
next to the nethermost hell, for such 
blatant perfidy, you "perjured villain." 
How such villainy, such arrant injustice, 
such infamous outrage, on law and order, 
can be perpetrated in a Christian land 
and go unquestioned and unpunished, 
passes my understanding. Justice and 
rig'hteousness and liberty should demand 
a "writ of habeas corpus" for the prison- 
er, and then fine and imprison this fake, 
not only for obtaining money and mem- 
bers under false pretenses, but also for 
false imprisonment. 

Obedience. 

The second point of importance in the 
lodge obligation is strict and unquestion- 
ing obedience to ithe commands of su- 
perior officers, and to the decrees of the 
lodge itself. This is an essential princi- 
ple of all lodges. Masonry especially de- 
mands absolute obedience. 

Sov. Grand Inspector General, A. T. 
C. Pierson says : "We may not call in 
question the propriety of this organiza- 
tion; if we would be Masons, we must 
yield private judgment." Traditions, p. 
30. He also quotes Isa. 8 :20, in support 
of such presumption. 
• Mackey says, "The power of a Master 
in his lodge is absolute." Lex., Art. 
Master. "The Mason is obedient to the 
Master, and the Master and the lodge to 
the Grand Lodge." Lex., Art. Obedi- 
ence. 

Webb's Monitor teaches that "the au- 
thority of the Masonic government is 
not in the consent of the governed," />. 
195. "The first duty of a member is to 
obey the edicts of his Grand Lodge. 
Right or wrong, his very existence as a 
Mason hangs upon (his) obedience to 
the jx)wers immediately set above him. 
. . . The one unpardonable crime in 
a Mason is contumacy or disobedience," 
p. 196. 

These quotations show very conclus- 



114 



O^ISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



ively ithat Masonry is not simply a mon- 
archy, but a veritable despotism. And 
while Oither lodges may not be as bad 
in 'tfhis regard as is Masonry, their teach- 
ing and spirit are very similar. Some of 
the other lodges expressly demand obedi- 
ence to all laws, and also to all the edicts 
of the Grand Lodge, as all lodges do, 
but demand unquestioning obedience to 
all superior officers. 

The obligations to unquestioning obed- 
ience to mere men, is contrary to the in- 
telligent freedom and independence of 
Christian manhood. No room is left for 
freedom of will, difference of opinion, 
personal conviction, or the compulsion of 
conscience. All of these must be stifled. 
No lodge man is free to follow his deep- 
est convictions. "He must yield private 
judgment." 

Lodge members 'have no liberty to 
"prove lall things and Ihold fast that 
which is good." / Thes., 5 :2i. They are 
not exhorted to do it, as Scripture de- 
mands. They are forbidden to do so. 
We are commanded to obey God's word, 
and to be "led by His Spirit." Rom., 
8 114. Yet the lodge insists that we give 
up our convictions, no matter how deep 
or strong, and follow the decrees of the 
lodge, and the wihims of its officers, not 
daring to refuse, or question, or dispute 
its right to dictate to us. Who can be 
conscientious, manly or independent un- 
der such slavis'h bonds ? No wonder that 
the majority of lodge men are too cow- 
ardly to assert their own manhood and 
independence ! 

It is very easy for any unbiased man of 
ordinary intelligence to see that an in- 
stitution demanding such absolute, un- 
questioning obedience to all its laws and 
officers is contrary to manly independ- 
ence, the freedom of love, service, and 
the spirit of free republican institutions, 
as well as conscientious devotion to God. 
The degrading and damninig influence 
of such diabolical teaching and training 
is very noticeable in the fact that the 
men, who have been enslaved and domi- 
neered over by an obligarchy, become de- 
spotic and tyrannical themselves, when 
their aggregation becolmes sufficiently 
numerous and powerful to do so. The 
most cruel and despotic people in the 
world are those w'ho have been ruled by 



an absolute monarchy in civil life, an ec- 
clesiastical 'hierarchy in religious life, or 
by a godless oligarchy in lodge life. 

Justice and fairmindedness generally 
go with manly independence. The most 
reasonable, fairminded man is the one 
who refuses the humiliation of voluntary 
slavery to ihuman despots. 

The law holds no man responsible for 
any act or contract whic'h he does not 
understand and know what he promises, 
or for any contract concerning w'hose na- 
ture and contents he has been deceived. 
But one is not .suppO'sed tO' know before- 
hand the nature of the oaths w'hich 'he is 
to take when be is to be initiated into the 
lodge. Of course he may learn of other 
men, or from books, but not from lodge 
men. For lodge men are absolutely for- 
bidden in all lodges to reveal any of the 
secrets to an outsider, or even tO' a 'mem- 
ber of a degree below their own. Yet 
lodge men talk as if these unknown and 
deceitful contracts were far more binding 
than were those which were perfectly 
'honest and ttboroughly understood. 

A man understands the obligations of 
bis churcb, or his marri-a'ge, or his coun- 
try before ihe takes them. There is usu- 
ally an effort made by each of these three 
institutions to make the candidate under- 
stand the conditions and obligations be- 
forehand. Some churches and countries 
require a certain length of time or resi- 
dence during wihich the candidate for 
membership or citizenship is expected to 
(inform himself of the covenant wihich he 
is about to enter into. Yet in spite of 
all these opportunities and expectations, 
he is at liberty to annul his vows under 
certain conditions in each of these cases. 
In such cases, he is absolutely free from 
all future responsibility in regard to 
them. No nation considers a man a 
traitor who becomes a citizen of another 
coumtry. No Protestant church seeks 
the death of one who forsakes its fold. 
Any man or woman in any state can get 
an absolute divorce, if the other party 
violates the essense of the marriage con- 
tract, and in most states, for many other 
reasons. Civil law considers a contract 
null and void if important facts concern- 
ing it are kept concealed, for it is con- 
sidered fraudulent. Furthermore, if one 
party to a civil contract violates his part 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



115 



of the agreement, the other party is re- 
lieved of all further responsibility in re- 
gard to it. 

Partiality. 

The third important element in lodge 
oaths is their obligation to partiality. 

What need is there of saying partial 
kindness, partial charity, partial justice, 
partial purity? We never say of a par- 
ent or teacher that he or she is partially 
kind or partially just. We simply say 
they are partial without alttributing any 
virtue at all ito their partiality. 

The fact is, were conditions to change, 
•the partial man would change his con- 
duct, and would be unkind to the one to 
whom he is now kind. In common life 
or law, suc'h conduct is considered vic- 
ious instead of virtuous. Yet strange to 
say, lodge men, and others, too, speak as 
if such pledges (to partial righteousness, 
justice or charity, were marks and acts 
of special virtue. But such conduct in 
common life is regarded as a mark of 
special vice in one's character. Indeed 
partiality corrupts the very acts of justice 
and benevolence themselves, and is be- 
lieved to destroy the very essence of 
justice and benevolence in such acts. 
Yet lodgery 'has the influence o-f so p>«- 
verting the public conscience in such 
matters that acts considered vicious, cor- 
rupt and wicked, in others, are esteemed 
rig^ht, just and good if done by the lodge. 
•Moreover the very putting of such oaths 
would seem to limit and restrict, yes, 
and even narrow the practice of right- 
eousness on the part of moral men. It 
must be a very poor sort of a man, whose 
standard of conduct is lower than the 
standard of this oath. If the lodge obli- 
gation 'helps the members of the lodge to 
be better, surely their members must be 
gotten from the very worst elements in 
society, instead of from the best, as they 
claim. If they take in real Christians, or 
even good moral men, their oath of initia- 
tion lowers the Christian's standard of 
morality. For Christianity demands thai 
we aim at a perfect standard, and is 
strongly opposed to anything else or any- 
thing less. No man can pretend to be 
even a moral man, whose life is not com- 
paratively clean and upright. Yet lodgery 
not only fails to seek, and set a stand- 
ard of perfect purity, Charity and right- 



eousness, but insists on one which is. 
partial throug'hout, and is satisfied with 
nothing else. I want to repeat this point. 
They not only permit the standard of 
partial righteousness; they insist on it. 
If this is not believed, let any lodge man, 
in a case in court, between a member of 
his lodge and a non-member, give all his 
testimony for the latter, wlien justice de- 
mands, and let him fail to recognize and 
respond to the sign of distress of a crim- 
inal. He will soon learn that lodgery 
does not mean justice, but partiality, and 
insists upon it, too. 

To see the low standard of lodge oaths, 
let one compare the membership of any 
lodge in the United States with the citi- 
zenship of the United States. Take even 
the most numerous, e. g., the Masons or 
Odd Fellows. Their membership is only 
about one in a hundred of the population, 
and in other countries far less. So they 
insist on justice, kindness, purity and 
charity with about one in a hundred here 
in this country, while Christianity insists 
on the practice of all these virtues, and 
all the rest, too, with every man, woman 
and 'child, no matter whether a member 
of any church or not. I believe most 
men would be good to one in a hundred 
whether sworn to do so or not. Some 
humorously insist on putting vinegar in 
soine things to sweeten them. Christ 
said, even the publicans and harlots 
would love and salute their own. Matt., 
5 46, 47. For it should be observed that 
while lodges pick out one or more, al- 
ways a few, of the long catalogue of 
Christian virtues, the practice of these 
few virtues is to be restricted to the fezv. 
So they are partial in two ways : they 
practice a very small list of virtues upon 
a very small proportion of people, and 
often fail in both of these points, too. 

One wonders what is the good of such 
an oath anyway. They are shut up to one 
of two horns of the dilemma. If their ob- 
ject is to make men better, they get such 
a poor class of men that the gospel does 
not or will not affect them, and only such 
an oath can and does affect them, and for 
the better. But they deny that they get 
such a class of men into their lodcfe. Sec- 
ondly the lodge might think that their 
candidates would be good to everybody 
else, except fellow lodffe men. Ilcuce 



116 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



•they needed a blood-curdling oath to 
make them good to lodge men. But loiok 
w'hat this implies : it necessarily impeach- 
es the moTal character of one party, or 
the ot'her. If (those already members are 
worthy of kindness and justice, the oath 
implies that the candddate is considered 
either so lacking, or so equivocal in moral 
character, that the lodge feels it neces- 
sary to compel the icandidate to deal just- 
ly and charitably with ithose already 
members. This practically condemns 
the candidate. But if we say the can- 
didate is all right, the oath condemns 
those already members. For in such a 
case, it implies that they are so unworthy 
of justice or charity that the incoming 
candidate cannot conscientiously bestow 
jusitice and dharity upon them. So a bitter 
oath must and does compel 'him to do so. 
But then such an implication condemns 
the candidate, too. For it timplies that 
under the pressure of an dath, or the 
fear of penalty, any such candidate can 
be compelled to lay aside all conscien- 
tious scruples, and bestow charity upon 
one Wholly undeserving of it, and ac- 
quit the criminal and vicious, and then 
call it justice, too. Furthermore this im- 
plies that the lodge and its officers, in- 
stead O'f seeking justice between man and 
man, is in t'he regular and constant or- 
ganized business of knowingly and inten- 
tionally perverting justice between man 
and man. Whichever way you turn this 
dilemma it gores them and there is no 
possible escape for them. 

Furthermore t'hese very oaths in Ma- 
sonry which seem so oommanding and ir- 
revocable at first appearance, are not so 
ironclad when investigated. The con- 
ditional clause, ''knowing them to be 
such," is a loop-hole big enough to per- 
'mit the safe escape of the majority of 
Masons, no matter how intelligent, high, 
or prominent, yes even of a Grand Mas- 
ter, or a Sovereign Grand Inspector Gen- 
eral. But let it not be forgotten, that 
thiis jiigglery in oaths relates to the very 
principle which they claim to be the 
foundation of the order. They are more 
strict in regard to the other principles of 
secrecy and obedience, and secrecy more 
than obedience. There is no obligation 
whatever unless one knows of a cer- 
tainty that the party in question is a 



Mason. Every specification under this 
obligation of partial righteousness has 
been ignored and violated under the ex- 
cuse that the injured one was not known 
to be a Mason, or a brother lodge man. 
When Breckenridge of Kentucky was ac- 
cused of violating his Masonic obliga- 
tions in regard to Miss Pollard, he de- 
clared that he did not know that her 
father was a Master Mason. And v^hen 
the Knig^hts Templar Conclave met in 
Louisville afterward, he was considered 
in sufficient good and regular standing to 
be one of the principal speakers. The tes- 
timony of Mrs. Sarah P. Giddings of 
Vermont, and others, proves that they 
are sometimes knowingly and lintentional- 
ly violated. All artificial ties may be 
broken, and those who are bound by 
them may become just as much estranged 
in personal feelirigs as members are 
toward non-members. In such cases they 
do not care a particle for their lodge ob- 
ligation. Neither does any one consid- 
er them ''perjured villains" for such vio- 
lation. But ithe obligation is considered 
in full effect and binding when the case 
is between a member and a non-mem- 
ber. He must fly to the relief of his 
brother lodge man, and- try to extricate 
him from all difficulty. 

The obligation to partiality is con- 
strued in two ways to relieve both the 
(helper and the helped. In the iirst place, 
a great deal of their so-called benevolence 
is not that of one lodge man giving to 
another, but is taking from an outsider 
w^hat belongs to him, and giving to an 
insider what does not belong to him, and 
no honor, but a dishonor to both lodge 
members. It might be an honor for one 
lodge member to sacrifice for another, 
which is occasionally the case. But how 
often is it a case O'f robbing Peter not 
to pay Paul but Judas Iscariot. In the 
second place, the obligation "to relieve a 
brother in distress" is not construed to 
mean when be is distressed financially or 
physically, but is taken to mean in dis- 
tress from the liability or actuality of 
losing position, standing, reputation or 
freedom from the clutches of justice. It 
is almost needless to cite instances in 
proof, in view of the numerous and con- 
stant cases of the miscarriage of justice 
in courts, so evidently due to lodge ma- 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



117 



nipulation as not to admit of reasonable 
doubt, and in many instances definitely 
known to be so. The very word and sign 
of distress are both intended and re- 
quired to be given so as to notify the ini- 
tiate without informing, or attracting the 
attention of, the outsider, who might be 
just as ready to render relief as is the 
initiated, were the man in distress found 
to be really worthy. For it is a well- 
known fact that most of the real charity 
in this world, i. e., giving to the really 
needy with no expectation of being re- 
paid, is performed by those who refuse 
lodge relationships and follow God's ap- 
pointed methods of helping the helpless, 
without any 'hope of reward, and doing 
it in the name of Christ, whicli is re- 
jected by the iodge. But these oaths 
that are obligations to help one another, 
when that other oug*ht not to be helped, 
and when good people would not help 
them, 'and unjustly favoring an insider 
over a more deserving outsider. 

Penalty. 

All secret societies have a penalty at- 
tached to their oaths. This is usually ex- 
pressed, but always understood, whether 
expressed or not. When the penalty is 
not definitely expressed in the oath, it 
may be impHed in it, or suggested by it. 
Otherwise it may be expressed or im- 
plied in the lecture following the oath. A 
few, however, have no penalty expressed 
beyond reprimand, suspension or expul- 
sion. Yet in the case of these lodges, I 
have heard those, still members, declare 
that tho'se who had been untrue to their 
lodge vows and seceded, ought to be 
punished, though they were no longer 
members. This shows that such mem- 
bers have a spirit that would injure such 
seceders, no matter Whether they could 
do it legally or not. In other cases we 
have seen them inflicting the penalty of 
persecute O'U, slander, abuse, and annoy- 
ance upon some one considered unfaith- 
ful. Such a one may not have revealed 
any lodge secrets, but simply renounced 
the lodge. So far as I have seen, I 
know of no lodge whose oath binds the 
initiate to life long membership. Yet 
the renunciation of membership by an in- 
fluential member is treated as severely as 
if he were thus bound. 

"The violation of any part of the ob- 



lis^ation," even the smallest and most in- 
significant can incur the whole penalty. 
This is expressly stated in nearly every 
Masonic obligation. As before stated,, 
some lodges which express no penalty- 
at all, enforce one just the same, for the 
violation of a part, or of the whole of the 
oath. Some such lodges whidh express 
no penalty in the oath, express, define 
and discuss the penalties in the constitu- 
tion and by-laws. 

The penalties vary from abuse, annoy- 
ance, slander, persecution and expulsion, 
to bodily mutilation of every sort, and 
physical death. In Masonry the major- 
ity of the penalties involves physical 
death. In fact, the penalties of Masonry 
are far more severe than are those of 
Scripture. In Scripture, only a few of 
the more heinous sins are punishable by 
death. In Masonry every violation, both 
great and small, is liable to the same 
penalty. There is no 'graduation what- 
ever as to penalty. 

The penalties of M'asonry are In viola- 
tion of the Constitution of the United 
States. Art. 8 of the Am.endments de- 
clares that ''cruel and unusual punish- 
ment shall not be inflicted." And Art. 6, 
declares, that the accused shall enjoy the 
right to a speedy and public trial by an 
impartial jury, — to be confronted with 
the witnesses against him ; to have com- 
pulsory process for obtaining witnesses 
in his favor and to have the assistance of 
counsel for his defense." All of these 
principles are violated by Masonry espe- 
cially, and some by other lodges, too. 

Worse still, the greatest crime among 
lodge men is not a violation of either di- 
vine or civil law, but simply disloyalty to 
the lodge. Neither does it matter how 
conscientious such disloyal member may 
be. The fact is, nearly all disloyalty to, 
opposition to, or renunciation of, or 
withdrawals from, secret societies, are 
from profound convictions, or for moral 
reasons. Every one knows that no one 
would oppose them for policy's sake, or 
for merely prudential reasons. 

All penalties are supposed to be in pro- 
portion to the gravity of the offenses. If 
it is out of proportion, it is unjust. Dis- 
honesty, drunkenness, robbery or adul- 
tery in the lodge or out of it, are not 
considered as bad as simply giving away 
a secret of the lodge. 



118 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



t^itorial 



The sympathies and prayers of our 
readers will go out for President Blan- 
■chard's speedy and complete recovery. 
He has practically performed for a long 
jtime the work of several men and now 
he must rest. He has been very sick. 
We trust that he is better and that a few 
.months of retirement will, with God's 
Iblessing, restore to him his former 
strength and vigor. Inquiries concern- 
ing his welfare addressed to this office 
will be promptly answered. 



THE HELP OF THE LORD. 

A thrilling conception of Christian 
service makes man appear to work with 
God. There is a clarion call which sum- 
mons man to the help of the Lord ; deaf- 
ness to this call invokes the curse on 
him who comes not to the help of the 
Lord against the mighty. 

To every generation comes s. special 
call, rallying its men of faithfulness to 
mighty antagonism; good haters are. as- 
signed some noble task, some critical 
post in the fight. No trifling foe is con- 
fronted, but one who is mighty. 

Fearful souls are turned back at 
Mount Gilead; lamps, pitchers, and 
trumpets are put into hands that pass 
beyond the early test. Excuses trans- 
mute fear into the aspect of reasonable 
prudence ; yet since imprudence is not 
reasonable courage, any excuse may be 
treated with candor. If it can be dis- 
proved fairly, it need not be lightly 
flouted — if it cannot be disproved, it 
ought not to be condemned. 

A voice crying in the solitude is 'call- 
ing our own generation ; the foe boasts 
himself mighty ; again comes the test at 
Mt. Gilead. What turns back those who 
leave others to answer the call? 

One remonstrates that it is useless 
folly to contend again'st a foe so mighty. 
Another protests that the enemy is a 
friend. Still another declares that the 
campaign is only against other enemies 
and that making this resistence and de- 
fending this point is fighting outside the 
lines. Whatever their excuse, they all 
find some path back from Mt. Gilead. 



Turning back from seeing the enemy, 
they turn back from seeking him. The 
sword of the Lord, and of Gideon! will 
not be their battle cry ; their torches will 
not startle the darkness, nor illuminate 
the enemy's camp. That glorious field, 
other victors win. 



NOT ALMOST RULE BUT QUITE EX= 
CEPTION. 

'Tn the early days of the Republic it 
may be said that it was almost the rule 
for the president of the United States to 
be a Mason," asserts the writer of an 
article found in The Southern Oddfel- 
low. The sweeping statement can be 
tested by examining the record of each 
of the presidents whose terms were in- 
cluded within that time. 

Washington, whose two terms cover 
the first eight years and the very earliest 
days, had been initiated many years be- 
fore the first day of the Republic. At 
that time he was just (attaining his ma- 
jority. He never took an advanced de- 
gree, and Masonic authority assures us 
that he was not a progressive Mason. 
One year, long after his early connection 
with a lodge, he was called Master of a 
lodge, near his home, in which the lodg'e 
records show that he was not once seen 
during the whole nominal term. His as- 
sociate and biographer. Chief Justice 
Marshall, wrote about forty years after 
he himself ceased to attend the lodge 
that he did not recollect ever to have 
heard Washington "utter a syllable on 
the subject." In 1781, a lodge commit- 
tee reported that it found "General 
Washington not to be Grand Master of 
North America, as was supposed, nor 
even master of any particular lodge." In 
1799, correcting :the similar error of a 
correspondent, Washington wrote, "The 
fact is I preside over none ; nor have I 
been in one more than once or twice 
within the last thirty years." That Wash- 
ington said that Masonry could be used 
for the "worst of purposes ;" but that it 
was "for the most part merely child's 
play." His two terms in the presidency 
covered the first eight years of the early 
days of the Republic. 

John Adams, who was president the 
next four years, had enjoyed the close 
friendship and counsel of the Attorney 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



119 



General for the Crown, Jeremiah Grid- 
ley. Knowing Mr. Gridley to be Grand 
Master of the Masons of Massachusetts, 
Mr. Adams "once asked his advice as to 
whether it was worth his while to be- 
come a member of the society." Grand 
Master Gridley, being his friend, answer- 
ed "No." He added a few words, and 
Mr. Adams remained free. 



Thomas Jefferson, whose two terms 
cover the next eight years, is not includ- 
ed in 'the list courteously furnished at 
our request by a prominent Mason who 
is .a lawyer in this city. 
- James Madison, who held the office 
through the next two terms, said in 
wniting : "I never was a Mason." 

James Monroe was not — so far as we 
•discover — a. Freemason. He was elected 
twice, and his second 'term ended March 
4, 1825, bringing the present record of 
"early days of the Republic" up to the 
end of the first quarter of the Nineteenth 
century, and past the first third of a cen- 
tury of the existence of the Republic. 

John Quincy Adams, who followed, 
was one of the strongest and most se- 
vere opponents Freemasonry ever had. 
His term, ending in 1829, completed the 
first ten terms of the presidency, and two 
score years of the "early days of the Re- 
public." 

Tested by details, the statement quoted 
at the beginning seems truly Masonic — 
though not otherwise true. 



LABOR UNIONS. 

The former teamsters' head, C. P. 
Shea, has been found guilty of attempt- 
ed murder of a former Chicago waitress. 

Some five hundred w^ere injured and 
fifteen killed in Chicago during the reign 
of Shea in the late teamsters' strike, and 
it v.as impossible to secure his punish- 
ment. The principle governing the 
unions is to defend a member to the ut- 
tern.ost if he is acting for the union, but 
let him shift for himself, if his crime is 
in his personal interests only. Hence, 
Shea suffers for his lesser crime. 

Last month chionicled the baptism of 
Orchard, whose confession of murders, 
committed, as de declared, at the 'behest 
of the Miners' Union, shocked the whole 
country. He seems to be a sincere Chris- 



trian and his confession respecting the 
Mining Union murders is generally be- 
lieved to have been naked truth. 

\yhat do our readers think of the- 
Union authorities which employed him. 
and of the present day methods of or- 
ganized la1>or? There is no greater foe- 
to republican institutions than the unions 
as managed and directed to-day. The 
press dispatches of July 22 give the un- 
animous resolution of the Wisconsin 
State Federation of Labor denouncing 
the use of the militia at Kenosha where 
non-union men were being beaten un 
by strikers and the lives of the citizens 
and millions of property depended upon 
this same militia. 



A STATESMAN TO COLLEGE MEN. 

An emment American who has al- 
ready won political honors, and bids fair 
to attain more, has said: "A college 
training teaches a man to be independ- 
ent, free, and an intellectual slave to no 
one. The hope of the country lies in the 
college man remaining true to himself. 
Do not get into a position where a man 
can tell you that you must do this or 
that for him, whether it is ri^ht or 
wrong. Such a position is easy to get 
into, but it means failure." 

He may not ihave known that his 
words would pointedly suggest the sev- 
enth Masonic degree, yet, in fact, one of 
the obligations uses almost identical 
language, where it says : "I furthermore 
promise and swear that I will aid and as- 
sist a companion Royal Arch Mason 
when engaged in any difficulty, and es- 
pouse his cause so far as to extricate him 
from the same if within my power — 
whether he be right or wrong." 

The final clause points the antithesis 
between the American sentiment and the 
Masonic obligation; yet this is not the 
only way in which Freemasonry obliges 
a man to be exactly what the noted 
statesman counsels college men not to- 
become. From the third degree to the 
seventh, while the obligation of the third 
point of fellowship does not use the very 
words Right or Wrong, it does yet as- 
sert and reiterate their implication 
clearly; for tihat obligation says: "Furth- 
ermore, I will keep the secrets of a 
VAorthy Master Mason as inviolate as my 



120 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



own, when communicated to and received 
by me as such, murder and 'treason ex- 
cepted — and them only at my own op- 
tion." Under this oatih a Mason is Ma- 
sonically allowed to conceal all crimes, 
and Masonically sworn to keep all 
crimes but two. After this has been re- 
iterated and he has proceeded to the sev- 
enth degree, the rule loses its exceptions. 
Thenceforth, no crime of a Royal Arch 
-Mason can be divulg-ed. The initiate 
<can now be compelled to aid, by silence 
and otherwise, even a murderer. 

We itherefore reiterate the stateman's 
counsel to college men : "Do not get into 
a position where a man can tell you that 
you must do this or that for him wheth- 
er it is right or wrong." 



A LUMP FROM A TROWEL. 

The Masonic Trowel, which is the or- 
gan of the Masonic Grand Lodge of Ar- 
kansas, places at the head of its first 
page the rather familiar legend : "Ma- 
isonry is a beautiful system of morality, 
veiled in allegory and illustrated by sym- 
bols." The Holy Bible, of which Ma- 
sonic practice makes a kind of mechan- 
ical use in countries where the book is 
held in esteem, teaches a system of mor- 
als ; there is such a science as Ohristian 
Ethics or Bible Morality. Apparently 
we are to infer that Masonry is a dif- 
ferent system. 

'What sort of system it is, has not es- 
caped the inquiry of competent judges; 
comparison with Christian morals could 
not be avoided. Trained minds, familiar 
w^ith ethical questions viewed from the 
side of religion and from the side of civil 
law, have applied mature judgment to 
the boasted morals of Freemasonry. 
Every condition demanded for critical 
examination and sound judgment has 
been fully met. 

The outspoken verdict of a few has 
been identical with the opinion of multi- 
tudes miore. A lawyer of the widest ex- 
perience and highest eminence as a 
statesmian, who could not be disputed on 
the ground' of incompetence, expressed 
his verdict in the terms, "Moral nui- 
sance." A pastor of churches in Chicago 
and Boston, whose Miasonic experience 
removed him from the position of one 
suspected of prejudiced outside judg- 



ment, gave the verdict, "Lying impos- 
ter." One who combined the qualifica- 
tions of an exceptionally well versed 
Mason, a lawyer, a preacher, a college 
president, and an author, gave this tes- 
timony : "Masonic oaths pledge its mem- 
bers to commit most unlawful and un- 
christian deeds." This testimony, sup- 
ported by the oaths themselves, warrants 
the two verdicts; and these two com- 
bined, has expressed the intelligent 
judgment of multitudes. 



THE ELSIE SIQEL MYSTERY. 

"Only God can find Leon Ling now," 
sai'd a Denver Chinaman. "He is under 
the protection of Masons and is being 
aided by them in his effort to escape the 
police." This puts the Miasonic order in 
direct conflict with law and government. 
It is charged against the Chinese govern- 
ment that it approves this Masonic hos- 
tility to American officers; but officials 
at the Chinese Legation in Washington 
discredit this statement. The question 
seems not to be 'whether Masonry, which 
our first American President said could 
be used for the worst of purposes, is 
being used for the present purpose. This 
seems to be undisputed. The question is, 
rather, wthether the Masonic order is 
abetted by the Chinese government in 
its hindering the officers of the law. 
That would be reprehensible in another 
government; in Masonry it would be 
only fraternal — not at all disloyal, or 
treacherous, or hostile to the protection 
of human life, or defiant of law. Per- 
haps most of the Masons involved are 
themselves Chinamen, who feel less 
bound to regard the American govern- 
ment; but that Masonry is a recognized 
foe of law and justice, is the impression 
gained. 



Little self-denials, little honesties, lit- 
tle passing words of sympathy, little 
nameless acts of kindness, little silent 
v^ictories over, favorite temptations — these 
are the silent threads of gold which, 
when woven together, gleam out so 
brightly in the pattern of life that God 
approves. — Dean Farrar. 



A ministry of doubt strengthens no 
man's faith. 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



121 



Mm^ of ®ur Pori 



EIGHT HUNDRED FIFTY. 

It is important for our correspond- 
ents and especially for the members of 
the Cynosure family, to remember that 
the city of Chicago has recently been 
renumbered and that the new base lines 
are State street and Madison street. 
The Cynosure office is now 850 West 
Madison street. Unless the new num- 
ber is used in addressing letters to us 
after September i, our mail will be 
very much delayed in reaching us. The 
Cynosure office remains just where it 
has been these many years. The only 
change is the new number. 



OHIO STATE CONVENTION. 

That it is possible to hold our state 
conventions with good results, even in 
the 'hot month of July, is proven by the 
one which closed July 27th in Lima, 
Ohio. The outrageous action of the 
trustees of the so-called Young Men's 
Christian Association of that city, and 
the report of the Convention will appear 
in our next num'ber. 

DO LODGES PAY TAXES? 

I know of a case where ?. lodge did 
not pay its taxes. I read in a county 
paper about three years ago that a lodge 
in Eldora, county seat of Hardin coun- 
ty, la., demanded a refund of tax that 
had previously been paid by the lodge. 
The reason set forth for the refunding 
of the tax was : that it was a charitable 
institution. The county supervisors al- 
lowed the claim. 

I met one of ithe Supervisors in town 
a shoT! time afterward and asked: Why 
the lodge chum was allowed? He 
answered ''Thai: is the law."' I told him 
that I very much doubted the right of 
lodges to be exempted from paying 
taxes. "They are a charitable institu- 
tion the same as churches," he said. 
They are not charitable in the same 
sense of the word that churches are, I 
replied. Persons who have received 
benefits from the lodge have paid for 
them three times over. He went away. 

A. T. Towley. 

Hubbard, la., July 14, 1909. 



Professor H. R. Smith, Jr., Houghton 
Seminary, New York, was for a time 
our lecturer in Ohio. He has a wide 
field among his students for the propaga- 
tion of the principles which he loves and 
for which he was pleader at one time in 
Ohio, his native state. One of his class- 
es in English chose as its theme the 
''Secret Empire" for theses by different 
members of 'the class. 

Brother Smith keeps tracts and books 
at hand and finds a field not only in his 
school, but among chance acquaintances 
outside. One of the instances of work 
among the latter was the saving of a 
young man last fall from lodge bondage. 
He writes 'that ihe finds that "The truth 
presented in a Chrisitian spirit moves 
men." He thinks that there is quite a 
strong anti-secret zeal among the stu- 
dents. God bless the Wesleyan school at 
Houghton, New York. 



Dallas, Ore., June 7, 1909. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips, 
Chicago, 111. 

Mv Dear Brother — Your kind letter to 
hand. Glad my friend Dallenbach is 
still out on the fighting line, and that you 
are at the old stand. 

We (brother and I) just closed a re- 
vival at Falls City, this state. During 
the meeting, I took occasion to present 
the lodge question. After showing them 
that it was anti-Christ, I asked how 
many would publicly renounce it. About 
12 stood up, and they are clear out. They 
were Masons, Odd Fellows and members 
of other orders. 

F. A. Phelps. 



TENNESSEE NEEDS ORGANIZING. 

Greenville, Tenn., July 15, 1909. 
Mr. W. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. : 

Dear Sir— It is strange that good in- 
tentions and grateful feelings should lie 
buried unexpressed in the human heart 
so long. I feel as if I owed a great debt 
of love to the N. C. A. I pray for it and 
its constituents as I do for the church. I 
prav God to speed the glorious cause. I 
read every page and column of the Cyn- 
osure and enjoy it beyond expression. 

I presume that we are the m.)st lodge- 
ridden people of any state in the union. 



122 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



It was the Tennessee legislature that^ 
-first m'ade it a crime to circulate a lodge^ 
ritual. It was 'a Tennessee senator whOjg 
presented a bill in the United States con--^ 
gress making it a crime to send any lit- f 
erature through the mail that would ex- J^ 
pose secret lodges. 

The town of Greeneville, near which 1 
live, boasts of having more secret orders, 
and the oldest Masonic lodge of any town 
in the state. One of our popular pastors 
publicly boasted of belonging to all the 
leading secret socities of the town. So 
far as I know, no minister has ever dared 
to speak against secret orders in this 
town. A yo'ung man had his leg broken 
not long since while taking the Jericho 
degree in an Odd Fellows' lodge here. 
One oitJher young man, son of a widow, 
was poisoned to death in Knoxville, be- 
cause he dared to go to work on the pro- 
test of his secret order, which was on a 
strike. 

Not far from me, now hes a poor man 
•dying with consumption, w'ho has been 
recently dumped out of ihis lodge, be- 
cause he could not pay his dues. And 
yet these orders boast of their charity. I 
know a number of old men, near 
bere, who have been demitted and 
•dumped out in their old age, just 
when they needed help. I point- 
ed these men out to a man, not long 
since, who said he had paid hundreds of 
dollars into his secret orders. The next 
time I met him, be pointed toward a 
beautiful residence in the city and said : 
"There's where mv lodge dues go. Here- 
after I am done with secret orders." 

'T cannot see how a preacher of the 
gospel can be true to Christ and not warn 
his people against the evils of lodgeism. 
A Methodist preacher, near my town, 
not long since, was wanted as a chaplain 
in the Odd Fellows' lodge. He said: 
^'Brethren, you know it is not lawful to 
use the name of Jesus in our ritual pray- 
ers and my ton'gue might slip." They 
said 'We'll keep it a secret or secure 
you." He promised and was elected. 
May God have anercy on such vain 
preachers' words ! 

I ask all the Cynosure readers to pray 
for us in Tennessee. God being my help- 
er, I am in the fight to stay. I feel it is 
-a good work for a minister to persuade 



young men and keep them from joining 
secret lodges, and to open the eyes oi 
-members, causing them to quit their 
lodges. Our state needs to be organized 
'as an N. C. A. State Association, so that 
we can work together for our deliver- 
ance. Light prevails over darkness. 
Christ is stronger than Belial. The 
dhurch is the grandest brotherhood 
known in all this wide world. 

(Rev.) W. S. Brady. 



SECRETARY STODDARD'S LETTER. 

Lima, O., July ly, 1909. 

Dear Cynosure — There were three 
young ladies on a street car, going 
from Millersville, Pa., the other day, en- 
gaged in an animated conversation. The 
conversation went 011 about as follows : 
Oh, giirls, you just ought to belong to our 
lodge. We have lots of fun. We have 
skirt dances and pillow case dances, and 
April fool dances, etc., etc. They are so 
exclusive, and it don't cost you anything 
to get in, all you have to pay are the fees 
and dues, and the initiation is such lots of 
fun, etc.^ etc. One of the girls said that 
her parents did not allow her to dance, 
but she thought they should allow her to 
have a 'little fun." 

As I saw, and heard, I thought : What 
do these young ladies know of pleasure ? 
The butterfly dancing around the mud 
puddle is having its fun, but the butter- 
fly is not immortal. 

The lodge people calling themselves 
''Eagles" had a time of dissipation in this 
city recently. Much sport was made of 
those who got drunk, the paper stating 
that those who remained for days to get 
sober "were not able to fly." 

Our Conference was held in the Y. 
M. C. A. hall here the 26th and 27th. It 
was welcomed by many. Whatever se- 
crets some of the lodges may have, the 
fact that they make drunkards is easily 
seen. 

With Max C. Baum of New York 
writing to President Taft, as a Masonic 
instructor, telling him to help a criminal 
(Morse), a Mason of 25 years' exper- 
ience, telling him he should do this as a 
requirement of Masonry, and with Eagle 
lodge men lying about the street drunk, 
the lodge exposes itself. Incidents like 
these ought to make our work unneces- 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



123 



sary, but as long as people are slow to 
comprehend, and are influenced to go 
wrong, our work will be needed. 

My efforts in Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, last month, were well sustained 
by friends, and will doubtless be very 
fruitful. Addresses were given in the 
Brethren Church, Ephrata. The interest 
awakened one year ago was increased. I 
'have now been privileged to speak five 
times to these friends. Cynosure sub- 
scriptions and a collection were given in 
our support. A special effort was made 
to bring the truth to the people of New 
Holland, Pa. Aided by Bretlieren Mus- 
selman and Wenger of the Mennonite 
church, a hall was obtained, handbills cir- 
culated, and a hearing secured for some 
wishing the facts. Bro. G. G. Sander was 
kind enoug'h to leave his work and take 
me in his auto to the top of the Welsh 
mountains, where a mission has been es- 
tablished to aid the colony of colored 
people who have congregated there. 
Brethren Mack and Sander are now in 
c'harge. Some are doubtless being helped 
to a better life. A description of the 
work these friends are doing would be 
interesting, but not in place here. May 
the Lord bless them. A small company 
gathered in the Brethren church at Bare- 
ville, Pa. Some there will read the Cyn- 
osure, who were unacquainted with our 
work. Our good friend, Elder Hershey 
Groff, cared for our needs. In Lancaster, 
at a Bible study in the Mennonite church, 
and a missionary meeting in the mission, 
I found oportunity to greet friends, who 
were 'helpful. En route to Ohio, stops 
were made in Fayette county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Brethren down there, w'ho have 
coal interests, are going to help us if de- 
velopments shall be what they hope them 
to be. 

I happened to call at Pastor Bahme's 
church, Youngstown, O., as a Confer- 
ence of the Ohio Synod Lutheran breth- 
ren were discussing the lodge question. 
I, of course, was glad to accept their cor- 
dial invitation to join in 'the discussion. 
The English Synod of Missouri Luth- 
eran Brethren, meeting in Cleveland, 
gave some thirty-five new subscriptions 
to the Cynosure and the best hearing they 
could, matters of vital importance to 
them being under discussion. The Ger- 



man mother synod invites the English 
speaking synod to become more closely 
associated with it. Steps looking to that 
end were before the synod. While there 
was doubtless unity of spirit, the thought 
was not the same. The warm discussion 
brought forth the tact and eloquence of 
able men. That the discussion was both 
instructive and interesting goes without 
saying. 

A meeting in the Free Methodist 
church. Rock River, O., and a lecture in 
the West Side Christian Reformed 
church, Cleveland, O., were features of 
my visit there. Our Christian Ref. 
friends gave a collection of $5.25 and 
many kind words, as usual. 

When arranging for state conferences 
or conventions I always look for what 
my father used to call *'the head winds"" 
first. Fortunately, I have not found the 
''head winds" here. The time for pre- 
paration was short but there was every 
indication that we would have a very 
helpful state gathering. We were not 
disappointed. The program will doubt- 
less be g^iven to Cynosure readers. Sev- 
eral meetings are arranged that will con- 
tribute to the central gathering. Let us 
look up and press forward to greater 
victories 

W. B. Stoddard. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., July 5, 1909. 
Mr. Wni. L Phillips, 

Chicago, 111. 
Dear Brother — I gave a preacher a les- 
son two weeks ago at England, Ark., 
based upon Rev. 13:8 and 11. It re- 
sulted in his quitting his lodge at once. 
He had been in it fifteen years; he said 
he never was satisfied to be thus mixed 
lip wiith all kinds of men ; he always 
thought that something was wrong but 
could not tell what it was. I showed 
him the dift'erent kinds of secret rituals 
which you sent to me and I put their 
teaching alongside that of the Bible and 
showed him how men stole God's worci 
and put it in their rituals, but leaving 
out the dear Christ's name. When he 
saw these books and understood their 
relation to the Bible he said to all the 
brothers in the church and to those that 
were there that were members of his 



124 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



lodge, ''I ne^er will have anything more 
to do with the lodge. You, brother, can 
tell the Chancellor Commander to scratch 
my name off of his book." The lodge 
brothers s'aid to 'him, ''Will you lose all 
the money you ihave been putting into 
that lodge, these fifteen years?" He re- 
plied, ''Yes. Do you think I would lose 
my soul for what money I have given 
those rascals? They have been stealing 
my money and yours, too. The treasurer 
stole $10,050 year before last, and since 
I find that I will lose my soul if I stay 
in (the thing, it is more than I am willing 
to pay for a 'burying place' and $300.00 
after I am dead and in hell." 

This is a true statement. I was at his 
home yesterday, and he has certainly 
quit the lodge. 

I met the church in this same settle- 
ment yesterday. The preacher took his 
text from the first Psalm 3d verse. I 
sat and listened very attentively to his 
sermon, but I could not see any sense in 
what he was saying. He said, "I belong 
to two or ithree secret orders," and then 
kept on saying, "Blessed is the man that 
walketh not in the counsel of the ungod- 
ly, not standeth in the way of the sin- 
ners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scorn- 
ful, but his dehght is in the law of the 
L'ord and in His law doth he mediate 
day and night." Then he would refer to 
the third verse which was the text, and 
tell what would ihappen to that kind of a 
man. I thought to myself, poor man! 
He doesn't known that he is mixed up 
with ungodly men, but I will tell him to- 
day, through Christ's strengthening me, 
how he is tied up in ithe devil's trap. 
After he sat down, I was introduced to 
the congregation as the Sister Mission- 
ary. 

After I had put our missionary work 
before the women, I opened my Bible 
and read the whole of the First Psalm. I 
then asked how many in this house be- 
long 'to secret orders. I found that a 
good many belonged to them. I then 
showed them plainly how they were 
yoked up with ungodly men and sinners 
till they all acknowledged that they were 
in the trap. 

One little man would not say anything. 
He is a preacher, too, and the same one 
that said last year "if I had my way with 



that woman, I would cut her throat." 

While I was reading and explaining 
the First Psalm, one sister said to her 
'husband, "I told you that lodge was 
wrong, and you are the cause of my be- 
ing in the thing." 

After service we all came out of the 
church and the brothers gathered around 
me and wanted to know if I had ever be- 
longed to a secret order. I replied, no. 
They said, "Tell us then, where you 
learned so much." I told them all about 
the National Christian Association, They 
said, well, sister, you have got us. I 
said, yes. Your lodge makes men mur- 
derers. They said, no, we won't murder 
ajij-one. I said, well, if you don't kill 
your brother, you promise to do it if he 
divulges the secrets. They said, "Yes, 
that is what we proimised to do, but we 
were not thinking wihat we were swear- 
ing to at the time, and Sister Woods, 
you are right; it does make us liars or 
murderers and that is all there is to it." 

The little mad preacher came out of 
the church with us but left at once. He 
could not stand it to hear me tell the 
secrets of his beloved Grand Master, 
Hiram Abif, and of his Most Noble 
Father and Grand Wood Chopper. 

Yours for Christ and His kingdom, 

Lizzie Woods. 



GOOD WORDS FROM FRIENDS. 

Rev. E. P. Kuhl : "I should like very 
much to be with you at the meeting in 
June, but it will not be possible. 

"I am still exposing the so-called se- 
cret work of the secret societies. A 
friend of mine told me on last Saturday 
that a Mason told him that I was just 
courting death. That fellow must be- 
lieve in his Masonic oath. I told him to 
tell the fellow that if he would come out 
of the woods long enough he would find 
that he was a back number, that I would 
furnish him his Masonic secret work in 
car lots if he would pay for it. I teil 
them that I will do better by them than 
the Ohio Masons did by Taft. I will 
not make them wait until they are elected 
President, hui will make them Masons 
at sight any old time they want to." 



Robert Cunningham : "I do not think 
I can be present at the meeting. 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



125 



"I am so glad that my eyes were open- 
ed to see the evils of secret societies. I 
am convinced that they are anti-Chris- 
tian; that they do detract very material- 
ly from our Christian growth, and what- 
ever does this surely must be anti-Chris- 
tian. 

"J^^st the other day I met a young 
man and spoke to him concerning his 
soul's welfare, asking him if he was a 
Christian. He replied that he was and 
the next moment pointed to the three 
links which he wore on the lapel of his 
coat. He did not say, 'I am trusting in 
Jesus Christ as my Savior.' No, but 
his first thought was of the three links 
he was wearing, and his actions proved 
conclusively to my mind that he put 
more stress upon the 'three links' than 
lie did on what Jesus Christ had done 
for him. You know that action is true 
believing. 

"One of the oldest ministers of this 
city, and one who has taken the highest 
degrees in Masonr}^ is very often called 
upon to conduct the funeral of those 
who are not even religiously inclined, 
and you know that many of this class 
are members of secret societies, but he 
never fails to leave the impression that 
all is well with them. We have words 
in Matt. 7:1-13: 'Not every one that 
saith unto me. Lord, Lord, shall enter 
into the Kingdom of Heaven, but he 
that doeth the will of my Father which 
is in Heaven,' and also Matt. 10:37, 
Tie that loveth father or mother more 
than Me is not worthy of Me.' 

*'If we are to judge a man by his 
actions we will be compelled to believe 
that with many of them their lodges are 
of more interest to them than their faith 
in Christ. And we all admit that we are 
most ready to speak of those things 
nearest our hearts. 

"It has been my ex|>erience that it is 
more difficult to get those who belong to 
secret organizations to accept Christ 
than those who do not, as many of them 
have the false belief that membership in 
such organizations is sufficient. 

"I can but believe that it is one of 
Satan's surest traps to ensnare yoimg 
men. 

"Christ must have the first place in 
our affections or none.'' 



Rev. W. L. Ferris: "Dear Friend 
and Brother : I wish 1 might be present 
at the national meeting. I am sure I 
would not only enjoy, but would be 
profited by the interchange of thought 
in connection with this great work. En- 
closed please find my contribution to- 
ward helping defray the expenses of the 
meeting. 

"The longer I live the more repugnant 
does the whole brood of secret organiza- 
tions become. I know of nothing — and I 
speak after thirty years' observation — I 
know of nothing which is so handicap- 
ping the work of the church, and hin- 
dering the cause of the Christ. They 
are taking the time, money energy, 
strength and, worst of all, the heart af- 
fection of men and women which ought 
to go into other and better channels. A 
faithful lodge member and spiritual 
worker in the church would be an ano- 
maly. There is something about the 
v^^hole business which, to my mind, de- 
moralizes the wliole Christian life. 

"The so-called 'Minor Orders' are 
working untold mischief. But the en- 
courag'ing feature in all this is that the 
opposition is rapidly growing. In many 
instances I find that men are ashamed to 
have it known that they are members of 
the lodge. 

"The people of Pekin know where I 
stand on the question. The Congrega- 
tional church, of which I am pastor, is, 
in the main, quite free from the incubus 
which hangs over so many churches, for 
which I am profoundly thankful. Trust- 
ing you may have a helpful meeting and 
that great good may be accomplished 
through the coming together of the foes 
of this great evil, I remain as ever. 
Your sincere friend. 

W. L. FERRIS. 



Rufina Fry: "I rejoice in every on- 
ward movement against the kingdom of 
darkness with its sworn secrecv and sfen- 
eral deviltry. It seems to me that the 
avowed hostility of the lodge to the 
Christ, the church, the family and God- 
ordained government, ought to arouse 
and interest at least all Christians and 
patriots in the N. C. A. movement. 

"I rejoice for the favorable circum- 
stances attending the meeting and that 



126 



OBJRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



you are carrying the expose and teach- 
ing to the 'regions beyond,' even in Chi- 
cago. May God abundantly bless and 
make the meeting the very best for His 
glory and the saving of multitudes from 
the snare of the lodge. 

"Enclosed find money order for $i.oo 
to aid the work. Yours for the exten- 
sion of the kingdom of God." 



Samuel Russell: "I am with you in 
spirit on the subject of Masonry and 
Oddfellowship. I therefore enclose a 
draft for $5.00, and send you my best 
wishes for your best possible success." 



A Householder: "I took in the last 
convention a year ago, and thought it 
was good to be there, and would attend 
in the future if farm work permitted. 

"I would be lonesome without the Cy- 
nosure, and hope and pray the time will 
come when the Church of the Anointed 
One will fight secret organizations as it 
has ^e saloon." 



Geo. W. Shealey: "The N. C. A. is 
fighting the most awful and dangerous 
foe of our poor, suffering humanity. 

"Verily the world is going after the 
great Anti-Christ. If it were only dol- 
lars we were losing, we might well bear 
the loss, but immortal souls are at stake. 
The Devil knows he has only to get a 
man or woman into lodge toils, and they 
are almost surely his. What tremen- 
dous victories he is winning. The Elks 
and Eagles are rapidly multiplying and 
their herds and flocks threaten to take 
the countrv." 



Rev. Dr. A. C. Dixon : "Personally 
you know I am in thorough sympathy 
with the objects of the National Chris- 
tian Association, and I will be glad to 
do all I can to contribute to the success 
of the convention in June." 



Rev. Dr. J. M. Foster: "The secret 
lodge system is the empire of Satan 
which he uses to destroy the divine in- 
stitutions of family, church and state. It 
is the world-old battle between Satan 
and the Christ. The issue is not doubt- 
ful. But the fact that so few of the 
professed disciples of Christ take the 



great battle of Almighty God seriously 
bespeaks severer fighting for the few 
whose eyes God has opened, whose 
hearts He has touched." 



Rev. E. L. Thompson: "I am sorry 
not to reach the convention. I am still 
free from the foolish idea that the non- 
sense spoken to me by men with hood- 
winks on their faces, and in big sepul- 
chral voices, was something to be kept 
secret, even if I did no longer associate 
with lodge men as such. How ridicu- 
lous their pretensions, when you have in 
printed form on the market the v/hole 
thing called 'secrets.' 

"Thank God I no longer even fear 
their threats. The strange thing to me 
is how Christian men can give sanction 
to the blasphemous trash that goes on 
under lodge auspices. I never left a 
lodge hall in the darkness of night, but I 
felt less a man than when I entered. 
Secrecy is of the devil ; it is anti-Chris- 
tian ; it is the foe of the church; the 
blight of society; the foster-mother of 
social impurity; a menace to the home 
and a curse to humanity. God save the 
church. 

"I wish I could be with you. May 
the convention do much good. Love to 
all who have conscience and courage 
enough to 'avoid the way of evil men.' 
and walk in the light as He is in the 
light, having fellowship one with an- 
other and cleansed by the blood of Cal- 
vary." 



Rev. W. H. Boles: "I pray for a 
great meeting. Go for the secret soci- 
eties of Rome, the most hellish and 
abominable of all. They threaten the 
life of the nation." 



Letters from sixteen States were re- 
ceived by the annual meeting: R. M. 
Stevenson and A. J. Millard, Arkansas ; 
George W. Shealey, California ; E. S. 
Peale, Jr., Georgia ; Robert Cunning- 
ham, Rev. E. L. Thompson, A. House- 
holder. R. N. Chestnut, Dr. A. C. Dixon, 
F. J. Davidson, Alice M. Starry, J. M. 
Porter, W. W. Boles, Samuel Russell, 
W. L. Ferris, E. P. Kuhl, Frank R. Dun- 
lap, J. W. Dallenbach, E. Lee Thomp- 



August, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



127 



son and James M. Moore, Illinois ; L. G. 
Bears, P. B. Fitzwater, Rufina Fry and 
Ann Richards, Indiana; Mrs. Alice A. 
Miller, J. N. Lloyd and James Stickel, 
Iowa; Mrs. M. J. Sleeth, Kansas; Mrs. 
Anna E. Stoddard, Massachusetts ; John 
W. Brink and John O. Reed, Michigan ; 
C. A. Johnson, Minnesota ; G. T. Dis- 
sette, Missouri ; William Harder, Ne- 
braska; C. D. Brooks and T. S. and M. 
L. Couch, New York; Hedda Worces- 
ter, North Dakota ; Milton Wright, Wil- 
liam Dillon, S. F. Hinman, T. W. Stew- 
art and Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Dickie, 
Ohio ; H. H. George, E. M. Gibboney 
and John Purdy, Pennsylvania. 



"Fuss and bluster too often get credit 
for what belongs to obscurer and hon- 
est worth." 



"When the nerve of faith shrinks, 
men become wonderfully far-sighted for 
fears and foes." 



The world would be more happy, and 
the mass of people in it just as wise if 
they would whistle more and argue less. 
— Sel. 



Love must be the predominating part 
of the Christian's life then the commun- 
ion will be a common union of believers 
in Christ. 



"Reasonable thought of to-morrow 

stimulates the doing of to-day's work. 

Anxiety for to-morrow paralyzes the 
best energy of to-day." 



It is better to be concerned about 
rock-bottom certainties than mountain- 
top ecstacies. — Rev. T. Watson. 



"Don't throw away your ticket when 
you get in the tunnel, for it's as good 
there as it is out in the sunshine." 



It is better to ask the Lord to direct 
our paths than to ask Him to correct our 
mistakes. — Rev. T. Watson. 



"A pure heart has a poor chance to 
show itself through a rough, harsh 



The body is only a casket for the 
soul. 



It is not truth, but error and preju- 
dice, which deprecate discussion. 



Arguments drawn from usage and 
customs may satisfy some; others de- 
mand arguments drawn from the Word 
of God. 



Phariseeism is offensive both to God 
and to man. 



I stood upon a mountain top. 
And then beside the sea, 

And there's a new horizon line 
In every mem|ry. 

I walked a little while, one day. 
With one of God's great men, 

And now, in every thought of him. 
The world is born again. 

— Florence L. Snow. 



Many a trusting child is cast down 
because the little love-service which may 
be required seems too small to be count- 
ed for aught in the great harvest field ; 
forgetting that the dear Lord asks of 
His children only so much as He gives 
them ability to perform. — Augustus C. 
Thompson. 



ANSWERING A CORRESPONDENT. 

Suffragettes can pass without reading 
a question and answer, found in The Su- 
preme Oracle's Department of a wom- 
ans' lodge paper. 

Question — Does an oracle lay herself 
liable to charges when she disreg^ards the 
ballot when it is unfavorable — ^^announc- 
ing it as favorable? 

Answer — If there are a sufficient num- 
ber of members of the camp who are 
willing to make afifidavit that the ballot 
was unfavorable when the oracle decided 
to the contrary, charges may be brought 
against her and she may be disciplined as 
provided by the by-laws of our society. 



voice. 



Entire happiness docs make one trem- 
ble. Only if we feel God in it, and stand 
but the more ready for His work, we 
may be safe. — A. D. T. Whitney. 



128 



CJHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1909. 



96 



PKIS 




JVIASONIC CHART. 

ILLUSTRATING THE RELATION OF SOME OF THE DEGREES AND RITES IN 

FREEMASONRY TO EACH OTHER. 

The accompanying chart represents one hundred and forty two degrees. 

I. The American Rite of 13 degrees; 2. The Scotch Rite of 33 degrees; 

3. The Egyptian Rite of 96 degrees. 4. The Mystic Shrine of one degree. 

5. The Eastern Star of 5 degrees for Master Masons and for women. These are side degrees, and not 
genuine masonry. 

The Symbolic degrees, or Blue Lodge of three degrees, are common to every Masonic rite, whether 
American, Scotch, or Egyptian, or whichever of the Masonic rites, named in Mackey's Masonic Encyclo- 
J>?dia one may choose to investigate. 

This chart shows in the Blue Lodge the position of the Worshipful Master and some of the other offi- 
cers of the lodge. Several positions of the candidate who is being initiated are also shown. In the Master 
Mason's degree is rc^gnized the murder, buriai nnil r^surrecti^rc Miene 0O full of Keligjous significance to 
ffreemasoDS. ' 



STANDARD WORKS 

ON 

Secret Societies 

FOR SALE BY THE 

National Christian Association, 

22 L West Madison Street. Chicago, III 



MODTIRN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL. 

Complete revifed oflBcial ritual of the Bene- 
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REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
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PRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
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A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
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OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGPEES 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 

ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THE 

INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
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THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages ; 5 cents* 

MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

Compiled by Rev. II. II. Ilinman, showing 
Masonic assault on lives of seceders, on reputation, 
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"A SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES" 

By Rev. S. P. Long. A. M.. Pastor of Fir^st 
English Liitlieran Chnvcn. Mansfield, Ohio. A 
very convincing article airainnt secret societies 
argued from a Scriptural standpoint. 27 pages, 
8vo., paper cover, 7c, per doz. GOc. 

"DIE RELIGION DER QEHEIMEN GE- 

SELLSCHAFTEN" 

Rv Prof. C'.nttfriel Fritschel. D. D.. of the 
Wnrtbnrg Theological Seminary. 76 pages, 
paper cover, 2oc, per doz. $2.-l6. 

"WAS HAT DIE KIRCHE MIT DER LOGE 

ZU THUNP" 

By Rev. Prof. r;eor;ge Frltschel of Wartbnrg 
Theological Seminary. Dubuque, la. 44 pages, 
paper cover, 10c, per doz. $1.00. 



ON FREEMASONRY 



FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of ^'"-iiy Louge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
Institution and a critical analysis of the chr.acter 
of each degree, by 1 resident .T. Blaucb .rd, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic autuorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 37ti 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cove.., 60 conts. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- 
trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
ferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths,, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
^hich are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
.vuracy of this work has been attested by high and 
unimpeachable Masonic authority. Cloth, 91.25; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 

OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
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KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

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A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

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strictly accurate. It Is substantially true, and as 
such is vouched for by Rev. S. A. Scarvie, of 
Decorah, Iowa (R. F. D. 6), a very excellent 
■Christian gentleman, and a seceder for conscience' 
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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 W. Madison Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

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Entered as Second-class matter May 19, i897, at the 
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CONTENTS. 



National Reform Convention 129 

Knlgiits Templar Conclave 129 

Why the Eagles Flew 129 

A Man Admitted 129 

Southern Lodge Organ 131 

Urge Fraternal Bureau 131 

Halting Beyond the Mississippi — Western 

Fraternal Congress 131 

Christian Workmen and Secret Labor 

Unions 132 

Credible Testimony 134 

"Come Out." By Albert Smith, Leicester, 

England 13o 

The Marquis of Ripon. A Seceder 13G 

Come Ye Apart and Rest Awhile. By 

President Blanchard 136 

Only Seventeen 139 

Westminster College 142 

XJrion Against "Frats." 142 

Java Bans Chinese Lodges 143 

Obituary — Mr. William Kiteley 144 

News of Our Work 144 

Minutes of Ohio State Convention 144 

Oliio State Officers 147 

Exiracts from Letters to Convention 147 

Y. M. C. A. Directors. By Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard 148 

Times-Dem.ocrat, Lima, O. — Editorial 149 

Secretary Stoddard's Letter 149 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter 151 

Kentucky Keeping Awake ■ 152 

From Our Mail 153 

Seceders' Testimonies 154 

Henry and the Goat 156 

A Crime to Print Rituals 156 

Knights of the Maccabees — Ritual 156 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

HANDBOOK OF FEEEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 6.39, Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge ^Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
graA'ings. The oaths, obligations and lectures are 
quoted verbatim, and can bp relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flexible 
Clotll, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes : "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
shining Freemasons in the Christian Church. 10 
cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THL 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By '-Spectator," AUanta, Ga. 16 pages; 
5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigious 
system, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion' ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
interesting. 30 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workings of 
Freemasonry," by hx-President Charles G. Finney, 
of Oberlin College. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago. 111. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

Its relation to civil government and the Chris- 
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un-Christian, anti-republican and despotic char- 
acter rot Freemasonry is proved from the highest 
Masonic authorities. 5 cents. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly Ut lUe ffurid; and in secret have 



said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLII. 



CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER 1909. 



NUMBER 5 



NATIONAL REFORM CONVENTION 

Held under the auspices of the Nation- 
al Reform Association in Park Street 
church, Boston, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 1909. 

"We hold that it is the duty of this na- 
tion to embody such an amendment in 
ovu* national constitution as will suitably 
acknowledge Almighty God as the 
source of all authority and power, the 
Lord Jesus Christ as the Ruler of Na- 
tions, the Bible as the fountain of all 
law and the true Christian religion as 
the nation's life." 



KNGHTS TEMPLAR CONCLAVE. 

The Knights Templars are planning 
for the greatest conclave in their his- 
tory to be held in Chicago next year. 
Preparations to that end have already 
gone forward to such an extent that even 
the line of march has been decided upon. 
The estimated cost of the decorations 
for the conclave is placed now at $.150,- 
000, but ''may go higher." 



WHY THE EAGLES FLEW. 

Eiks objected to bartenders, though 
they initiated wholesalers and brewers ; 
lience the Eagles were organized. While 
their order is not limited to men. behind 
the bar, it welcomes them and is in a 
sense their own. It was organized on 
account of tliem and a procession of 
Eagles shows that its invitation has been 
accepted. A portion of the visiting flock 
can be found in that street of the enter- 
taining city where saloons are. The 
question whether Eagles have alighted 
there will soon be answered, "Yea, yea !" 

BEAKS AND TALONS FLOCKING. 

"Whieresoever the oarcas is, there will 
the eagles be ga^thered together." Was 
a political carcas scented, near Fitoh- 
burg when a banquet of the Eagks was 
spread for a greater gaithering of dis- 



tinguished guests than ever had eaten 
together in that city ? The state armory 
was filled with those w'ho came flock- 
ing from four states of New England. 

Massachusetts was represented by its- 
governor, lieutenant governor and seven 
members of the executive council with 
the executive secretary. 

The governor of Rhode Island was ac- 
companied by his military staff in full 
uniform. 

Connecticut 'had a representative in 
its state comptroller. 

One of the most distinguished guests 
was General Nelson A. Miles, whose na- 
tive town is adjacent to Fitchburg. 

Although Worcester is the largest no- 
license city in the world, the chief of 
police came, as well as the mayor, who 
was one of seven mayors of Massac^hu- 
setts cities. Thinking of the Eagles, one 
naturally thinks of the saloon and the 
Eagle cry Yea ! Yea ! Thinking of such 
a banquet of the order, he naturally re- 
flects 'that, (however the rum interest may 
seem to be weakening, politicians still 
know that many votes are yet controlled 
by the saloon power. 

A MAN ADMITTED. 

One night in the torrid month of Au- 
gust, a Worcester (Mass.) patrolman 
w'ds summoned to a lodge room on Main 
street, where feminine indignation and 
fury were driving the thermometer rap- 
idly up to record tigures. A special 
meeting of Adele Circle, C. F. of A., 
had grown so exciting that some of the 
girls were almost hysterical. A sister 
had come down to Worcester from Fitch- 
burg. who was a member of Vachere 
Circle, and a Grand Trustee — that is, a 
('7. T. F. A., or something of about that 
shade of alphabetical importance. Her 
name was Mrs. M. Lemay. 

What did this visitor and G. T. do but 



130 



CHIUSTIAN CYNUJSUKIU. 



September, 1909. 



persist in seating herself on the platform 
right beside Miss Flora E. Girard, who 
is no less a dignitary than the C. C. or 
Chief Companion. Moreover, she came 
to rjiake a speech that some of the gentle 
girls did not wish to hear. What won- 
der that Miss Girard refused to go on 
with the meeting. Yet the contuma- 
cious guest lO'f 'the lodge refused to go 
down and sit among the other ladies of 
the noble order ; nothing below the plat- 
form was high enough for her. Had 
she not come all the way- from Fitchburg 
to say her say about Miss Mahoney of 
Boston, who had been deposed from the 
office of Chief Companion. She wanted 
to show that it was according to the fit- 
ness of things that M'iss Mahoney should 
no longer be a G. C. C. F. A... She could 
show that deposing Miss Mahoney was 
just the right thing to do, but a number 
of A dele girls didn't want to be shown 
any such thing. They didn't need to be 
told what was right or wrong by any 
Fiichburg woman, even if she was a 
G. T. 

But she would not get off that plat- 
form. Then they resorted to the help 
of a man. Walter N. Drohan was be- 
sought, or commanded, or something, to 
send an officer to the meeting quick. 
Bravely the patrolman entered the lodge, 
surprised, and wondering why a roomful 
of pretty girls should call a policeman. 
Up to the platform he courageously ven- 
tured, where he asked Miss Girard what 
was wanted of him. The young Miss, 
pointing to the recalcitrant Mrs., ordered 
him to remove her. 

The patrolman knew his business; 
perhaps under such circumstances no 
man on the force would be rash. It is 
no light task to remove a woman. He 
found out what was the trouble ; he made 
sure that the visitor was a member of 
the noble order; he ascertained that she 
was in good standing. Then, gracefully 
saluting her, he made the polite request 
that she would accompany him to an- 
other seat in the room, and the lady 
found him irresistible. Not a word mur- 
mured she against the gallant man in 
uniform ; silently she swalloweJ her dis- 
pleasure at the )oung ladies of the Adelc 
sisterhood, until the. meeting adjourned; 



but then she and her circle gathered and 
whispered. While they held the fortress 
other girls formed indignant knots on 
the street below and friends of Miss 
Giirard even went so far as to call Mrs. 
Lemay a *'butter-in." That is a worse 
name than Oleomargarin. Anyway, it 
was dreadful, and the society is all split 
up. Still the sweet sisters do show their 
good sense in waiting for the decision of 
the Supreme Circle meeting in Atlantic 
City to consider the very question of the 
deposition of the worthy G. G. C. The 
C". C. abides in Worcester and tlie G. T. 
has gone home. And surely, honorable 
mention is due to the patrolman. 

SOUTHERN LODGE ORGAN. 

Southern Masonic lodges have been 
charged with having nursed secession. 
Afterward appeared the Ku Klux Klan, 
w'hich was referred to in April by Our 
Heritage, the ofifiicial organ of the 
Daugiiters of the Confederacy, when the 
secretary of a chapter in Mississippi 
said; "Mrs. Rose is in communication 
with the only living charter members of 
the Ku Klux Klan, and will read a pa- 
per before the convention showing what 
the south owes to this Legion of the 
Cross." The following contribution by 
a veteran of the Confederate armv shows 
what a secret society organ is willing to 

print ; 

"The one mistake about secession was 
the delay in adopting it. We should not 
have waited so long that our enemies had 
become too powerful to resist. But the lack 
of wisdom in the premises, that is, the de- 
lay that proved fatal to our efforts, was 
not in the generation just preceding our 
great war, but in those revolutionary fore- 
fathers of ours, who transferred as from 
the benignant rule of old England to the 
merciless tyranny of New England. 'Throw- 
ing off the yoke of England!' We have 
heard that term ad nauseum, when there 
was no more yoke upon our necks than 
there is upon that of Canada to-day. And 
there wovild be no yoke now, whether we 
had seceded from England or not, but for 
the idiocy of men like Jefferson, Madison 
and others, who turned us over bound hand 
and foot to our implacable enemies. 

"The true prophets of the day were un- 
heeded, if not actually stoned. Patrick 
Henry's argument against the adoption of 
the Constitution by Virginia has not yet 



September, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNU.su UK. 



131 



been answered. Grayson's prediction of the 
result stands as one of the most remarkable 
of political prophecies. He points our, that 
the adoption of the Constitution meant 
their final subordination to the North. 

"If the advice of such men had been heed- 
ed there would be no accursed spirit of 
John Brown to move the brutal masses at 
the North to hatred and envy of the South; 
no mowing down on hundreds of battle- 
fields of the flower of our manhood by the 
hordes sent forth by Lincoln and his co- 
conspirators; no horrors of reconstruction; 
no reduction, perhaps permanent, of the 
Southern States, to conditions of conquered 
provinces. 

"John Randolph often made allusion to 
'the prison under the weight of the Consti- 
tution.' Even he never dreamed of its 
virulency." 



URGE FRATERNAL BUREAU. 

Owls Want One as Part of Department 

of Commerce and Labor. 

Reading, Pa., Aug. ii. — 'The supreme 
session of the American Order of Owls 
indorsed to-day a project for the creation 
of a bureau of fraternities to be connect- 
ed with the Department of Commerce 
and Labor at Washington, and making it 
2i misdemeanor to organize a branch of 
amy order unless its constitution was ap- 
proved by the bureau.- — Ledger, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., Aug. 12, 1909. 



NATIONAL FRATERNAL CONGRESS. 

Last month some 1,000 delegates to 
the National Fraternal Congress met in 
Boston. Ihey represented fifty-one fra- 
ternal insurance societies. Two-thirds 
of the delegates first to arrive were wom- 
en. According tO' the president's state- 
ment, the fraternal insurance companies 
have over $8,000,000,000 insurance in 
force. 

Upholds Minimum Rate Movement. 

Concerning the minimum rate question, 

President Piper said: 

"It cannot be contravened that the battle 
for minimum rate legislation has accom- 
plished much for the salvation of fraternal 
societies. Minimum rates made it possible 
for all societies to do a safe business. 

"Valuation would disclose conditions and 
furnish opportunities for a wisely managed 
company to show a surplus and either to 
give further benefits to its membership or 
in some manner to return a portion of the 
cost." 



HALTING BEYOND THE MISSISSIPPL 

In a first page paragraph, headed : 
"Oppose 'the fraternal bill," "Jhe 
Knights of the Globe" says : '"A num- 
ber of fraternal societies doing business 
in the trans-Missiissippi states have or- 
ganized the Western Fraternal Congress 
to antagonize the uniform fraternal bill 
decided upon by 'the National Fraternal 
Congress and the Associated Fraternities 
of America. The feature specially ob- 
jected to, is that requiring all societies, 
after a certain date, to charge the same 
increased rates for new members there- 
after admitted. Resolutions were adopt- 
ed declaring that the National Fraternal 
Congress table of mortality, on which 
the proposed rates were to be based, was 
unreliable, and that a new mortality ta- 
ble, based on a more adequate range of 
experience, is now being prepared by the 
associated fraternities of America." 

If any other organization can do still 
more than the Congress has seemed to 
attempt in order to save widows and or- 
phans from the consequences of poor in- 
surance, i% is in that degree to be wel- 
comed. If, however, this new organiza- 
tion 'has for its real purpose a plausible 
avoidance of the reform, it is as much 
to be deprecated as a flood or a con- 
flagration. We can hardly help classing 
the venture into fraternal insurance with 
the venture into Wall street, where the 
trustful lamb goes to be shorn. It may 
be that the acknowledged lengthening of 
human life in America .has proceeded far 
enough to require lengthening of the 
mortuary table ; but changes made in the 
interest of the secret system would be 
open to suspicion. 



We wish to call attention to the adniir- 
able letter published by the Times-Demo- 
crat of Lima, O., written by our Secre- 
tary Stoddard. Ought not the Y. M. C. 
A. to cut out the "Christian" from its 
title? The better way undoubtedly would 
be for it to refonu its practises so that 
its present name should be in confcrin- 
ity to the Bible standard both as to cour- 
tesy and contracts. 



The God of providence is the God of 
love. 



132 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



fontrtbutions* 



CHRISTIAN WORKMEN AND SECRET 
LABOR UNIONS. 

By Frederic Perry Noble, Ph. D., 

AUTHOR OF "the REDEMPTION OF AFRICA." 

The reader will see at once that the 
"business now in hand is not the relation 
"between the workingman as a class and 
the trade-union in general. It is quite 
another matter that at present concerns 
us. It is the attitude of the Christian 
workman toward the secret labor asso- 
ciation. The question is a large, a diffi- 
cult and a delicate problem. It is one of 
many aspects and bearings. It is not to 
be disposed of offhand or to be airily 
■waved aside as involving impracticable 
ideals and wire-drawn distinctions. Yet 
in the modest judgment of the present 
writer, — speaking from the Christian 
-point of view, wbich is the bsoadest and 
inost human standpoint, sympathizing 
with every legitimate object of law-abid- 
ing associations of laboring men and be- 
ing acquainted with the Scriptures and 
with the social and economic needs of 
fhe laborer, — it looks as if the reply to 
"the query whether Christian workmen 
should join secret labor unions is sug- 
:gested by the following ideas of the 
Bible : Be separate, come out and have 
no fellowship with works of darkness. 

Of course these requirements im- 
mediately impose a burden on the Chris- 
tian laborer, in the same way as the mere 
fact of being a Christian did with the 
-citizen of the Roman empire or does to 
the convert from modern Mohammadan- 
ism or paganism, even if they do not in- 
volve actual hardship. The trade union 
expresses the recognized and legal rigiht 
of workers to combine for their own in- 
terests, their mutual benefit, their self- 
protection against inadequate laws, un- 
healthy conditions and unjust employers 



or combinations of capitalists. All over 
the world they have attained sucH power 
that the open shop in many industries 
has almost closed, and its final extinction 
there appears to be only a question of 
time. Where the worker is to go who is 
not a member of a labor union and what 
is to become of him and of bis family 
are aching and insistent problems, for 
the secret labor guilds do their worst to 
prevent him from securing employment. 
Fortunately, however, two facts appear 
to lessen the blackness of his and so- 
ciety's outlook. 

The first is the fact that the govern- 
ments of the supreme industrial states; 
as America, England, France and Ger- 
many, have of late years, especially 
through the law and the courts, demon- 
strated that they cannot and will not al- 
low the law of the nation and the rights 
of society at large to be overridden by 
the laws of any labor league. One has 
but to recall the executive action of 
President Cleveland and the legal action 
of Judge Taft ; the TafT Vale decision of 
the English judiciary; and the uncom- 
promising attitude of the French admin- 
istration toward the postal employes' as- 
sociation. The second is the fact that the 
Christian Church in every civilized coun- 
try of the globe is even more awake than 
before to its duty to the workingman, to 
the economic needs of society as a whole 
and to its function in the redemption of 
industry and the body politic. 

These fact, however, are in the nature 
of corollaries growing out of the central 
thought, if, indeed, they be not digres- 
sions. Let us step back to the traveled 
main highway. 

That the Christian laborer cannot sub- 
scribe to the obligations, of the secret la- 
bor union without disregarding the re- 
quirements of the Bible seem self-evident 
both from the standards and ideals of the 



September, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUUE. 



133 



Christian and from the practices and 
character of the secret societies. 

The Christian is in the world, but not 
oi the Avorld. He is bidden to be, not 
conformed to the fashion of this world, 
l)ut to be transformed in spirit and in the 
renewal of his nature. Christians are 
commanded to be a people peculiar to 
God, that is, belonging to Him, chosen 
iDy Him, and separated from men of 
merely mundane spirit and materialist in- 
terests. The society of Christians that is 
called the Church is a universal organiza- 
tion with selfless objects and spiritual 
ideals, though these include setting up 
the kingdom of God on earth by renew- 
ing society and life as well as saving the 
individual ; wHereas the secret society Is 
a close corporation with self-centered 
aims, secular methods and worldly stand- 
ards. The Christian organization is a so- 
ciety whose 'members find their Hves in 
losing them for other men's sake; but 
the other is an organization whose mem- 
bers lose their true life in seeking to 
.save their own Jives alone. Is it practis- 
able for one and the same man to serve 
these two masters with full and even 
liand ? Will he not love the one and hate 
the other, or cleave to this and forsake 
that ? 

The model set before Christians is the 
Carpenter of Nazareth — the meek and 
lowly, yet strong and exalted Man, who 
at once was lamb and lion, friend of sin- 
ners and fearless foe of sin. These col- 
locations of qualities are neither acci- 
•dental nor arbitrary. The combination 
of these traits of character in the first 
Christian Workman, whose poverty and 
life of toil put Him peculiarly in touch 
with the toiler and the poor, shows what 
the carpenter, the engineer, the factory 
hand, the field laborer, the lumberman, 
the miner or the sailor, if he be a follow- 
er of the Christ, must himself be and do. 
He should not be self-assertive and ar- 



rogant nor the friend of sin. He must 
be strong to defend the right, and yet be 
a friend in spirit toward sinners. Can he 
do these things and not those, be this 
and not that, if he is a member of a 
secret order of workmen? 

The nature and methods of certain 
secret labor associations would appear to 
indicate an emphatic "No !" with reason- 
able certainty. (It should first be stated 
that every one of the following assertions 
about them is based on observation and 

public records.) They chiefly, if not 
solely, aim at the betterment, not of so- 
ciety and her state, but they ignore the 
claims of the state, to which, according 
to Scripture, every citizen owes alleg- 
iance first after God. They selfishly dis- 
regard the rights of society, — that larger 
organism and vital whole of which they 
relatively are small members and from 
which they draw their very life-blood. 
They too often try to deprive the non- 
union man of the natural right to earn 
his living and thus, if he have a family, 
to support his helpless dependants. They 
frequently do not hesitate at crimes of 
violence, assault, murder, riot and even 
rebellion. They insist that the boycott is 
a lawful weapon, though the courts have 
again and again adjudged it illegal. 
They favor arbitration between employ- 
ers and workers only as a last resorr, 
though the interests of society demand it 
as the first and immediate means of in- 
dustrial peace. They still less desire 
compulsory arbitration, for this involves 
appeal to the state as the supreme mas- 
ter ai:d judge. They, in the judgment of 
not a few impartial and qualified jurist-, 
form a combination for the restraint of 
interstate commerce and so trench di- 
rectly on the sovereignty of the Federal 
Union. Too many of their leaders arc 
Debses, Maddens or Sheas, too few Ar- 
thurs, Burnses, Mitchells or Povvderlys. 
Bribery, corruption and grafting are al- 



134 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



most inevitable attendants of their 
secrecy. They iblink the fact that trade 
unions are only a minority, a small mi- 
nority, too, of the wage workers in 
America and in Europe. The secret la- 
tbor associations' periodicals are unjust, 
if not untruthful, in their references to 
Christianity and t<he Church. The non- 
secret trade union may justify its exist- 
ence, but no Christian laboring man can 
consistently be a mem'ber of a labor 
union that observes secrecy and works in 
darkness. It is useless to aver that in 
joining it he is inspired by a missionar}^ 
spirit and 'by pure motives, for in such 
environments of secrecy Christian char- 
acter, conduct and principles have no 
scope for the play of their activities. -It 
is true that even a little leaven leavens 
an entire lump, but this is because the 
lump has affinity with the leaven. The 
Christian is the leaven of society, but 
the secret society is not the sort of stuff 
that can be leavened with him. When 
water and oil mingle together, you can 
successfully mix secret societies and 
Christianity. But no sooner ! 
Chicago, July 22, 1909. 




SOCIETIES 

With Secret Oaths Approved by Bryan. 

Kenton, Ohio, July 28. — 'William J. 
Bryan was entertained for an hour this 
evening at the local Elk rooms en route 
from Bellefontaine, where he lectured, 
to Chicago. Mr. Bryan spoke for 20 
'minutes before a large audience, follow- 
ing a public reception. In ^his address 
he declared his emphatic approval of se- 
cret societies, saying that at one time 
he had mistakenly disapproved them. 
''The brotherhood of the secret societies 
and the churches is aiding most materi- 
ally in ushering in the new universal 
brotherhood of man," he declared. — 
July 29, 1909. — ^Cincinnati Enquirer. 



The face is ordinarily an index to the 
heart. 



A. H. SHANK. 

CREDIBLE TESTIMONY. 

By Eld. A. H. Shank. 

A very common method for disarming 
the criticism against secret orders, is by 
inducing the pu'blic to discredit its relia^ 
bility; and with the unthinking masses 
this seems quite effective. Most people 
would rather discredit than investigate 
— confirming the old adage that "the 
public glories in nothing so much as in 
being humbugged." 

When criticism comes from those who 
never had any affiliations with the or- 
ders, the reply is, ''As they never belong- 
ed to them they know nothing about 
them ibut hearsay, and therefore, their 
testimony is unreliable." If the criticism 
comes from those who have withdrawn 
from the orders, the reply is, "They are 
perjured villains," and therefore cannot 
ibe ibeHeved. So the public is to believe 
nothing but what the members of the 
orders themselves see proper, or expedi- 
ent, to proclaim, or deny. Will this sat- 
isfy an honest or intelligent inquirer ? 

If we dare not believe those who are 
disinterested, if we dare- not believe those 
who are free and able to expose its sins 
and secrets, how then can we beHeve 
those whose interest and obligations it 
is to conceal, or deceive? In other 



September, 1909. 



(CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



135 



words, are adherents of the orders to be 
believed on the subject? Is their testi- 
mony credible ? 

Suspicious Testimony. 

The very fact that the subject of their 
testimony is not open to investigation, 
carries with it the serious taint of sus- 
picion, which years of observation and 
experience have taught us to be well 
founded. But beyond all this, we could 
not accept the testimony of an adher- 
ing secretist on the subject of his own 
order, for these reasons : 

1. His alliance with the order dis- 
qualifies his testimony. It would not 
be credited in a trustworthy court of 
justice. No man is asked to incriminate 
himself. If witnesses were to be restrict- 
ed to criminals, yea, to the very persons 
who are parties to the crime involved, 
what criminal could ever be convicted? 
If the testimony on secret orders shall 
be restricted to their own devotees, how 
could you ever convict them even of the 
most evident guilt ? Yet such is the pre- 
posterous assumption of their advocates. 

2. He is already committed in his tes- 
timony imder solemn obligations, and 
even penalties. However reliable his tes- 
timony might be on other subject's, in 
this case his covenant with the order 
allows no choice. Whatever else may be 
included, it will hardly be denied that 
these obligations at least involve the fol- 
lowing: (a) Concealment, (b) Sup- 
port and defense, (c) Obedience to its 
rules and orders. 

Now then, it is plain that under such 
obligations no adverse testimony could 
'be expected. The only alternative is 
silence or falsehood. Before any mem- 
ber would feel at liberty to testify ad- 
versely he would have to repent of his 
obligation. But true repentance would 
mean renunciation, and separation ; and 
so no longer an adhering member. 

3. His interest in, and obligation to, 
the order, unfits his mind for trust- 
worthy judgment and testimony. This 
is constantly recognized in our courts 
of justice. The reader, likely, has been 
present at the formation of a jury. 
Among the questions put to each mem- 
ber of the same, is, whether an. opijuion 
is entertained as to the guilt or innocence 
of the man on trial. If so, he is at once 



rejected. If then, a mere opinion is pre- 
isumed to bias the mind so as to unfit 
it for reliable judgment in a disinterested 
case, of what value is the judgment of 
a man on the subject of a secret order, 
in which he liimself is an active partici- 
pant, and to the support, defense and 
concealment of which he is already com- 
mitted under solemn obligations ? Plain- 
ly such a man's testimony and judg- 
ment, in this particular subject, is en- 
tirely worthless. 

An Illustration. 

It would be painful to relate how un- 
truthful men in high places have been 
found on the subject of secret orders, 
so much so that the confirmation of an 
oath would add little to the value of their 
testimony or judgment. 

We will refer to but one instance as a 
sample, which occurred in the presence 
of the writer. 

More than twenty years since, dur- 
ing a series of revival meetings, ^several 
brethren were informally assembled in 
a private room. In the course of con- 
versation the subject of a certain secret 
order became the theme. One of those 
present referred regretfully to a part of 
the initiatory rite. A well-known Evan- 
gelist present, who was conducting the 
revival meetings then in progress, 
promptly denied the statement, saying 
that he himself was a member. But the 
Minister making the reference had at 
one time also been a member of the 
same order, and an eye-witness. So he 
put the matter squarely, so that he could 
not think the Evangelist would dare to 
deny. But, whether on account of those 
present, or because he still thought it 
was mere '"bluff," he insisted on his de- 
nial. So the brother, without sign or 
grip, simply presented his certificate of 
membership, signed and sealed, together 
with the of^cial manual, granted only by 
the authority of the order. That ended 
the controversy. Since then we have met 
manv members, claiming to be pious, but 
none whose example we could recom- 
mend. 

Philadelphia. 



The evidence'^ o* ' 'iristian character 
are mostly positives. 



136 



CHUISTIAXS' CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



"COME OUT." 

Come out from secret lodges, with 

Their ''obHgations," oaths, 
To unknown chiefs, conspirators. 

For auglht the s'wearer knows ; 
Allegiance from the Christian 

Is due to God and King; 
To Christ, His Church, the family, 

"Touch not the unclean thing!" 

Come out from every business which 

May do thy neighbors wrong; 
The noxious weed, the mingled cup. 

The gambler's den and throng; 
From those who scoff at things divine 

And heed not sound reproof ; 
Let those that name the name of Christ 

From all such stand aloof. 

Of "Universal Brotherhood" — 

The tempter's subtle snare, 
A brotherhood with Satan's brood !— 

Let sons of Goid beware ! 
H.OW can there be communion 

To one in Christ baptised. 
With unbelievers, infxdels, 

With Belial and Christ? 

"Come out and be ye separate, 

And touch no unclean thing;" 
Stand forth for truth and righteousness. 

Which life eternal bring ; 
The God who made the universe 

Can help and will receive, 
And be a Father unto all 

Who on tlis Word believe. 

Albert Smith. 
Leicester, England. 



THE MARQUS OF RIPON. 

The Springfidd Republican recently 
published the following communication : 
To the Editor of the Republican : 

In the Republican of the loth inst. 
you mention the death of the Marquis of 
Ripon and note that, succeeding the 
present king of England in that high 
office, he became grand master of Ma- 
sons of England. But you fail to record 
the fact that the Marquis of Ripon re- 
signed his office, abandoned Masonry 
and became a devoted member of the 
Catholic church, in whose communion he 
labored for the v/elfare of our holy faith. 
A Former Kiiight Templar, now a Cath- 
olic. 
Falmouth, July 13, 1909. 



COME YE APART AND REST AWHILE. 

By President Blanchard. 




BY WIND AND TIDE. 

Dear Fathers and Brethren : 

In my last letter I spoke of the illness- 
which God had permitted to come upon; 
me. It was very serious and for a time it 
seemed that my work on earth was done^ 
In this emergency I sent for the elders 
of the church, who anointed me with 
oil in the name of the Lord and prayed 
for me. The prayer of faith saved the 
§ick and God raised me up — ^at once I 
began to recover. 

Not long after the dear brethren, with 
whom I have been permi'tted to labor 
these many years, raised a large sum of 
money, purchased tickets and sent Mrs.. 
Blanchard and myself away to this- 
beautiful country to take an absolute va- 
cation from labor. It has been strange- 
to be idle, but it has been good to have- 
leisure to commune with God and in alL 
this itime, even when I was most ill, I 
found peace and g^ladness in talking with 
my heavenly Father. 

Now that weeks have passed and my 
strength is returning, I feel that it is 
duty and pleasure to share with you in 
a small way the blessings bestowed upon 
me and mine. The 'little yadht, which I 
place a.t 'the head of my letter, was afloat 
on the waters of what is called the 
North West Arm of Halifax harbor, and 
the building in the background is one of 
several boathouses which are on the 
shore of the beautiful bay. 

The boat picture which follows is of 
a lady and her daughter, who were veiy 



September, 1909. 



CU1U«T1AN C5i:JSOSUKE. 



137 



courteous to Mrs. Blanchard and myself. 
Learning that 'we were strangers the 
lady introduced us to the club of which 
s'he was a member, which gave us the 
privilege of the house, grounds and 
shore. As she and her daug'hter were 
pushing off for their home across the 
Arm they allowel me to take the snap- 
shot w'hioh vou find here. 




AFLOAT ON THE NORTHW^EST ARM. 

In this connection let me once more 
recur to the old argument for secret so- 
cieties that by them one finds friends 
when sick and among strangers. I have 
studied lodgism with an open mind forty 
years and have never known a secret 
order to do for its members what God 
through His people has done for me. 
Take, for instance, the large and gener- 
ous provision made for us on this jour- 
ney, and the courtesy of this lady to two 
strangers, whom she met and was glad 
to serve just because she was a Christian 
woman. 

This seems to he a fitting place to re- 
cord the courteous attentions of Dr. and 
Mrs. MacMechan, old friends of our 
Mr. Alexander Mackenzie of Wheaton. 
As we were leaving Chicago, Mr. Mac- 
kenzie kindly handed me a letter of in- 
troduction to Dr. MacMechan, and he, 
his wife and daug'htcrs did all in their 
power to make pleasant our stay in Hali- 
fax. We were twice in their ho'me and 
they called upon us at our "hotel. Just 
before leaving they gave us a most de- 
lightful afternoon on the North West 
Arm on the occasion of a regatta given 
bv the rovvins: club of that name. 




DALHOUSIE COLLEGE, HALIFAX. 

Dr. MacMechan is professor of Eng- 
lish in Dalhousie College, a picture of 
whose building we were fortunate 
enough to obtain. This institution is of 
special interest to friends of Rev. Dr. H. 
M. Scott, recently deceased. Its founder 
was the Earl of Dalhousie, whose name 
it bears. Its largest single benefactor was 
Mr. George Munis of New York, who in- 
vested nearly three hundred thousand 
dollars in its work. Even when here as 
a young man. Dr. Scott gave tokens of 
his future greatness, taking prizes in al- 
most all lines of liberal culture. The 
'catalogue of his time shows three first 
prizes won (by him in a single year. 

The lodge 'movement is strong here 
in this old, new% wild region as it is 
everywhere else in these last days. 
Wihile we were in Halifax the Knights 
Templar Masons held a meeting there. 
A day or two after the Knights of Py- 
thias came for a parade, excursion and 
Grand Lodge and at St. Johns in New 
Brunswick the Odd Fellows were hold- 
ing their annual meeting, ^^^hich was 
largely reported in the papers. 

It was very difficult to see the com- 
munity given up to idolatry without 
making a public protest, but the weak- 
ness of the body warned me that pres- 
ent duty was to rest. The Masonic 
Temple in Halifax is not an imposing 
building, though the picture presented 
does not do it justice. The position of 
the building does nc<t allow one to get 
the better view whicli would be obtained 
from the street below. The use of the 
cross on the clothes of these pseudo 
knights was, at it has always been, in- 
expressibly horrible to me. ' Poor, 



138 



('HKISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 




MASONIC TEMPLE, HALIFAX, N. S. 

wretched, sinful men, covered with trink- 
ets of all sorts, smoking stinking cigars 
or cigarettes and displaying in a dozen 
places the cross on wihich Jesus died for 
our sins. 

Yet here as everywhere God has His 
witnesses. I was speaking with a beau- 
tiful, clear-headed young man, who ac- 
cupies an influential position in the 
Young- Men's Christian Association of a 
neighbor city. He said most of our men 
are in some sort of lodge, and I have 
been very clearly informed that if I 
wish to retain my posiition it will be well 
for me to avoid criticizing the lodges, 
but I told them I did not have to live in 
this town and that I did not propose to 
sell my liberty for the privilege of do- 
ing so. 

On the train not long after this con- 
versation I had one of very different im- 
port. A gentleman, pastor of a Presby- 
terian church in Iowa, justified all the 
lodge' iniquities without ihesitation. He 
said he had taken thirty-two degrees in 
Masonry ; that 'the oaths, penalties and 
ceremonies were all right and that he 
advised young men all to join. In Hali- 
fax I met a dear old minister, who had 
taken seven degrees in Masonry. He 
said : ''There are many things in Ma- 
sonry which are wrong. The penalties," 



he said, "are horrible, and then the com- 
panionship. 

'T knew," he continued, "a woman 
whose ihusband was a man of great pow- 
er and influence. He joined the Masons 
and soon became a miserable drunkard. 
His wife told me that he never touched 
liquor until he became a member of the 
Masons, but at once after that he began 
to drink." 




ODD FELLOWS HALL, DARTMOUTH, N. S. 

Across the harbor from Halifax is an 
ancient town called Dartmouth. The 
Odd Fellows hall is the largest of the 
two buildings shown above. The town 
is not very enterprising to judge from 
its appearance and one is not strongly 
attracted by it. 

The chief interest here during our 
stay was in tennis matches. A week 
was spent in deciding the champion- 
ships of Nova Scotia, and the next week 
was employed in contests between the 
champions of New Brunswick and the 
province first named. In fadt these old 
English towns seem very largely given 
to athletics. In Hahfax or vicinity, 
while we were there there were the ten- 
nis contests above named, a golf con- 
test and the rowing contests of the re- 
gatta spoken of above. These, of course, 
take a great deal of time and money. 

They are all open air amusements, 



September, 1909. 



CHKISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



139 



1 


-m 


^ .JSm"" / J 


1 



A TENNIS MATCH AT ST. GEORGE S, HALI- 
FAX, N. S. 

they ibring together pleasant aiil conge- 
nial people, they are infinitely superior 
to dancing in dusty, crowded, overtheat- 
ed halls. Then, too, these people who 
like so much to pilay also like to work 
and are effective workers when play 
time is over. 

We have not been to church a great 
■deal since leaving, though we are able 
to spend more time in this way as days 
pass. In a word, ihowever, we may say 
that the preaching has been good, plain, 
effective prea'ching. There has been no 
apparent attempt at personal display, 
rather a desire to explain the Word of 
God simply and forcibly. God multiply 
the la'borers for t'he white fields. 

We thank you all for your prayers. 
Faithful through His faithfulness. Very 
truly yours, 

Ciharles A. Blanchard. 



— William H. Taft ihas said : 'T 
would like much to offer personally a 
word of encouragement to those who 
have in charge the very important in- 
terests of the many thousands of mem- 
bers of fraternal societies. I realize the 
power which 'these fraternal associations 
exercise for ^the good of the members 
and their protection in sickness and the 
protection at death of tho6e depending 
upon them. I sincerely hope that the 
efforts of all may be exerted in perfect- 
ing and perpetuating a system by which 
the two commendable purpo'scs of all 
such societies may be fully achieved.'' 

But is it po'ssible without radical revo- 



lution to make this rather attractive 
dream harmonize with substantial 
reality ? 



€5tt0nal» 



Our beloved President Swartz return- 
ed from the Orio convention a sick man. 
After three weeks' confinement to his 
bed he is again able to be up. He sur- 
prised and gladdened us in the office 
with a call a few days ago. 



ONLY SEVENTEEN. 

Only seventeen ; it may seem young to 
a man, but how old it is for a girl. Long 
dresses, beaux, social functions, possibly 
even an engagement and a ring, all these 
lie within the possibilities of seventeen. 
And little Milly Miles was seventeen 
years old. There was, therefore, no rea- 
son why she should not join the Gamma 
Sigma Zeta of her high school, for, be- 
sides her own mature age, her father's 
bank account and her mother's conse- 
quent social position fairly demanded 
that their daughter should assume the 
(jreek letter dignit}^ which belonged to 
her. Of course it was different with 
raanv other high school girls. 

It had been trying to Milly when she 
felt herself outside an exclusive set, in 
which were some who had been her 
friends while she wore short dresses and 
was still in the sdhoc'l grades. They seem- 
ed to talk with their fingers and to keep 
a}>art airing mysterious shows of confi- 
dences in which she had no share. Tliey 
knew secrets their mothers could not 
learn ; they had been initiated into won- 
derful wisdom their fathers could not 
know. More than this, they could have 
wonderfully good times in secure secrecy 
with none but selected witnesses to see. 
and no ono who. •.•diatever happened, 
could ever tell. ]\rillv susnected nothing 
more needing secrecy than some trick 
])la\ cd on an outsider more i)lebeian than 
the Zetas, or some school roguery which 
no teacher could probe ; but what fun it 
nius'c l)e to have such larks securelv on 
the sly ! 

^^'hen, however, she came fully into 
tile hands of the dignitaries of the Gam- 



140 



CHKIJSTIAN CYTNUSURE. 



September, 1909. 



m.'.i Sigma Zeta, and realized formal pre- 
paration for the initiation ordeal gravely 
begun, there was something in the dim- 
ness and silence, with the solemn and 
awe-struck tones of her guides, that 
turned her thoughts more apprehensively 
to what might await her within the mys- 
terious room into which she v/as to 
coniC. Her heart beat almost painfully 
though her will did not falter. vShe 
would let nothing dampen her steadfast 
ambition to become a sister in the glori- 
ous order with the ancient name. Sliades 
of Greek heroes and matrons seemed 
awajting her. 

With formality and silence the chil 1 
was led slowly into a room so dim that 
in the first instant she saw nothing dis- 
tinctly. This condition was made more 
dtective by two or three blinding ilashes 
which filled the preparation room at the 
m.onient when she reached the inner 
door. When her sight again conformed 
itself to the darkness which followed, 
she saw all sides of this larger room 
with black-robed and dark-masked fig- 
ures, motionless, silent and dimly visible. 
As she entered, the door closed behind 
her and she heard the impressive click 
of its lock. 

At the farther side of this room, on a 
slightly elevated dais and within a sable 
canopy, sat the robbed and masked figure 
of the High Priestess of the Greek 
named order. Slowly and with ceremo- 
nious pauses, the girl was led toward 
her until at length she stood at a little 
distance, when her conductor, after re- 
maining an instant with averted face, re- 
turned to the door, which creaked as it 
opened, then closed again with a dead- 
ened yet heavy sound and the click of 
the lock. In the midst of silence and 
mystery the girl stood all alone, save 
for the dark figure dimly seen. 

y\t length, awe-struck, she heard the 
hollow, unnatural tones of the High 
Priestess, who made this startling in- 
quiry : 

*'Are you prepared to undergo ordeals 
to prove yourself fit to become a sister 
of this order?" 

Hardly able to speak, she succeeded 
in assenting with trembling* lips. At 
her right, dark, heavy curtains unclosed 



and a voice from within whispered 
hoarsely : 

"Enter." 

The High Priestess led the way into a 
smaller room hung with sable drapery 
that covered the walls, and dimmer than 
the room from which they came. The 
curtains fell together again and they 
were alone, when, slowly turning, the 
priestess, in measured but muffled tones^ 
^aid impressively: 

"The first test is to prove your forti- 
tude. Without fortitude you may not 
become a sister. Observe before you 
the cauldron of molten lead. Obeyt 
Thrust your hand into the cauldron." 

The surface of the metal quivered ; not 
less did the terrified girl ; yet bravely she 
summoned her will and extended her 
hand toward the cauldron, when sudden- 
ly another hand caught her arm and 
lifted it high. 

"vSpare her," whispered a voice that 
seemed to come from the black drapery 
of the wall ; she has dared the fiery test, 
is not that enough?" and the High 
Priestess responded solemnly : 

"It is enough." 

The fainting girl had fallen to her 
knees, but a cool spray breathing on her 
forehead revived her so that she could 
be led back to the other room. Repress- 
ing the tendency to hysterics, she suffer- 
ed herself presently to be led along an 
uneven way and up irregular steps after 
being securely blindfolded. She was at 
length halted and after a pause she 
heard a distant voice chant the ominous 
words : 

"The hour has now come for you to 
descend to the lower regions. Summon 
all your courage, for it is a place of 
dread and danger." 

Wondering, she stood for a silent mo- 
ment, when she became aware that with- 
out the touch of a hand she was being 
mysteriously pushed forward. Stepping 
to recover her balance, she went over 
the edge of a precipice. Far down, and 
still down, she seemed to be falling, un- 
til at last she lay, helplessly, at the foot 
of the dreadful descent, in something 
soft enough to save her life from crush- 
ing. All around she heard groans and 
dreadful sounds which she could not un- 
derstand. Out of these at leneth dro- 



September, 1909. 



(JilKlSTlAN CYNOSURE. 



141 



ning words (began to take form, and 
say: 

*'\ou are now in the lower regions — 
in the presence of departed sisters. 
Though they would be called dead in the 
world, they are conscious here. They 
are your sisters, and you must greet 
them as such. Reach forth you right 
hand." 

The poor girl could hardly move her 
hand feebly to obey. 

''You arc ordered to clasp the hand 
of your departed sister," continued the 
voice in the gloom. A cold, clamm}* 
hand stole into her own and the child 
shuddered. I'resently the voice breathed 
again, saying : 

''You are now to drink the draught 
that will make you of one blood with 
your sisters in the order. Accept the 
cup." 

Half raised, she was held in a sitting 
posture, while something smooth, round 
and uncanny to the sense of feeling was 
laid in her hand. The dreary voice drag- 
ged itself through surrounding sigh and 
groans, and said : 

"The cup from which you must drinl^ 
is the skull of a departed sister." 

The girl cringed, and shrank, bendin^,* 
low. 

"What !" hoarsely whispered the dis- 
tant voice. "D'o you falter, and at the 
eleventh hour?" and the child drank a 
draught so bitter that, without its horror, 
she would have shuddered. Then faint 
voices whispered all around : 

"It is well." 

Swaying weakly, she was half led, 
half carried, she knew not where, and 
left for a few minutes to regain her self- 
control. Hardly, however, was she more 
than able to sit erect in a chair and con- 
trol the hysteric choking that was like 
a threat of spasms in her throat when, 
still blindfolded, she was startled by 
hearing the High Priestess say in a de- 
clamatory tone : 

"Now for the supreme and final test. 
Summon all your remaining courage." 

"Faithful guardians, lead the candi- 
date to an ante-room. There you will 
remove all her clothing to the waist; 
then you will return her hither for the 
final ordeal." 

By the time this preparation was end- 



ed she was limp and on the very verge 
of hysterics. The High Priestess said 
impressively while the guardians were 
bringing her back: 

"It is necessary that this ceremony be 
indelibly photographed in your memory. 
To this end it is ordered that the initial 
letters of our beloved soroity be burned 
upon your back. Guardians, brand the 
candidate." 

Instantly she felt the cruel iron on her 
back, and cai.ght the odor of burning 
flesh. Shrieking she fell in a swoon. 

Soon after arriving at home she went: 
into violent hysterics, which the old! 
family doctor found hard to bring under 
control. When at length he had succeed- 
ed in quieting the girl, who had been one- 
of his pets from her childhood, he came 
near transferring the hysterical condi- 
tion to her mother by stating with merci- 
less plainness his opinion of such care of 
a mere child as delivered her into the 
hands of hidden, childish tormentors. 

"Why, doctor," protested one of Mil- 
ly's intimate girl friends, who after help- 
ing her home had remained until the doc- 
tor come. "Nothing real was done,, 
those were only little scary tricks. That 
cauldron of molten lead which you say 
you have heard about before, was just a 
tin pot half filled with quicksilver. That 
fall into the lower regions was from the- 
seat of a chair into a pile of pillows. 
That dead hand she raved to you about 
was nothing but an old kid glove filled 
with wet sand and kept for an hour in an 
ice box. That skull she drank from was 
nothing but half a cocoanut shell partly 
filled with cold thorougihwort tea — 
nothing was any more dangerous than 
the piece of ice she thought a branding 
iron. What she tells is only what we- 
made her think." 

'*A11 you did," said the doctor, severe- 
ly, "was done as you confess, to make 
her think, and with that thinking you 
little savages worked up a case for the 
doctor, li T were her father I would 
make the rest think. They would dis- 
l^and this shameful, unladylike order, or 
I would initiate them into the ancient 
and honorable court room. And to think 
thpt I have been the family doctor ever 
since most of them were babies. I have 
a good mind to renounce the profes- 
sion." 



142 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



WESTMINSTER COLLEGE. 

The stand taken by Dr. Russell, presi- 
dent of Westminster (United Presby- 
terian) College in reference to secret so- 
cieties 'has been noted in the Cynosure. 

The maintenance of the law relating 
to fraternities has cost the president and 
his co-laborers much trouble and perse- 
cution. That there is no disposition to 
give away to lodge clamorings will be 
recognized by the following, which ap- 
pears in the Christian Instructor of July 
20: 

"Government by, high Christian ideals 
is the policy of Westminster College. 
These are held up and insisted upon in 
the life of the institution. In developing 
them, true Christian association among 
the students is encouraged and every- 
thing which in the nature of the case 
would prove a hindrance to this is dis- 
couraged. Secret organizations of stu- 
dents for any purpose are regarded as 
such a hindrance. 



^ 



^ 



"The admmistration has no apology 
to make for effort to secure a college 
order consistent with the foregoing 
statement of moral ideals. The noblest 
moralists of all ages and nations have 
condemned secret organizations as a 
menace to the highest social order, rec- 
ognizing that what is good does not need 
the support of secrecy, and that what is 
evil is rendered more dangerous thereby. 
The action of many State legislatures 
in prohibiting secret societies in the high 
schools of their states, has a. bearing 
upon the college situation also, since if 
the institution be prejudicial to the life 
of the lower schools it can scarce claim a 
better morality in the higher." 

The Cynosure wbuld congratulate 
Westminster. We are sure Christian 
people will support such an institution. 



GOOD CHICAGO SCHOOL BOARD. 

Puts Frats in Same Category as Law= 
breakers and Burglars. 

The Chicago Tribune of Aug. 18 con- 
tains an account of an interview of the 
President of the Chicago School Board 
with a young man, Mr. Donovan, grand 
master of the Kappa Alpha Pi, who had 
made a plea for leniency for the high 
school "frats." 



"I told the young man," said Presi- 
dent (Jrion, "that fraternities and sorori- 
ties have no place in the public school 
system and that we had formed a rule 
against them, that that rule was a law 
and that they were just as much violat- 
ing the law as the housebreaker who 
goes into a house and takes what does 
not belong to him. 

"I also told him that even if we had 
to depopulate the high schools we would 
crush out the fraternities and sororities. 
The public schools are democratic insti- 
tutions, supported by the people, for all 
the children, independent of class, race 
or religion. 

"I told him, furthermore, that when 
an organization of 15 or 16-year-old 
boys or girls set themselves up as social 
censors and were permitted to exist, it 
was the beginning of the sapping of the 
foundation of our public school system. 

"I can say that we will expel every 
one we find belonging to any such or- 
ganization, and, m:oreover, we will see 
that he or she is never taken back into 
the schools again. I intend to suggest 
this to the board at an early meeting, 
and I know the sentiment of the board 
sufficiently on this point to say it posi- 
tively. The expulsion will be perma- 
nent." 



URION AGAINST "FRATS." 

Hopes of the members of the high 
school fraternities ' and sororities, which 
have been on the rising scale since the 
election of Alfred R. Urion as president 
of the board of education, from whom 
they expected more lenient treatment, 
were blasted by Mr. Urion this morning. 
He declared himself unqualifiedly 
against the high school Greek letter so- 
ciety. 

The reason for the expectations of the 
young high school pupils was that a son 
and a daughter of President Urion were 
high school society members. Mr. 
Urion's eldest son, attending Dartmouth 
College, was a member of the Kappa 
Sigma Psi fraternity at the University 
High School, while his daughter is an 
active member of the Iota Beta Phi 
sorority at Mrs. Lorings', a private 
school for girls at 2978 Prairie avenue. 

With the statement of the newlv elect- 



September, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



14J 



ed superintendent, Mrs. Ella Flagg 
Young, that she is opposed to the high 
school fraternity, and that so far as she 
is concerned there will not be a single 
step in retreat from the position taken 
by the board last year, the matter was 
called to the attention of President 
Urion, and he warmly backed up the 
remarks of the superintendent. 

"I do not in the least object to be- 
ing quoted on this matter, as I wish 
it distinctly understood that I am an 
opponent of the high school fraternity 
and sorority," said Mr. Urion. "The 
fact that my own son and daughter are 
members has given me an insight into 
the doings of these societies which has 
merely strengthened my opposition." 

Mr. Urion said his children became 
members of their respective societies 
without his knowledge, and that since 
their joining he had observed no effect 
which recommended the Greek letter so- 
cieties to him. The fraternities may, 
therefore, look for a strict enforcement 
of the rules formulated by the board last 
year. — Chicago Evening Post, July 31, 
1909. 



JAVA BANS CHINESE LODGES. 

The Java Times reports that a new 
ordinance imposes a fine of 100 guilders, 
or rigorous imprisonment for three 
months on any Chinaman in Java who is 
found to possess the documents or em- 
blems of a secret socviety, or is caught 
wearing the distinguishing marks of a 
secret order. Any Chinaman will incur 
similar penalties by presiding over a 
secret society meeting, allowing one to 
be held in his house or even neglecting 
to inform the authorities if he knows of 
such a meeting; and will be punished 
similarly if he recruits in Java for an 
order, supplies it with money or gives 
it any kind of help. This is the ounce 
of prevention that is worth a pound of 
cure. 

The Times speaks of the law as fall- 
ing heavily upon Chinese secret socie- 
ties, and such orders as belong to China 
seem to be meant, yet the Chinese are 
too often inclined to become Freemasons, 
and Masons as well as Tongs are al- 
ready numerous in the Oriental quarter 
of more than one American city, and 



arc credited with protecting Chinese 
murderers. 

While in one aspect such a law as has 
been reported from Java appears con- 
trary to the usual policy of the United 
States, there is after all nothing uncon- 
stitutional or disorderly in at least reg- 
ulating any order on reasonable grounds. 
Law and official authority are checking 
the evil in public schools, and with even 
greater justification could restrict or 
prohibit Freemasonry, which has been 
thoroughly proved to be far more vicious 
than school fraternities. Masonic testi- 
mony, reluctantly given under pressure 
of the lawful oath and in the shad- 
ow of impending penalty for perjury, 
has cHnched this proof, the call for an 
American public school law has not been 
emphasized by many deaths, if by any, 
but virtual manslaughter has reddened 
the record of college fraternities; while 
the history of Freemasonry makes it nat- 
ural to recognize in New York or Bos- 
ton bloody crime perpetrated or protect- 
ed by both Masons and Tongs, and 
criminals or victims who belong at the 
saiiie time to both orders, or to the .Ma- 
sonic and some other. 

It would seem wise for this conti- 
nent to adopt as her pilot the alert, 
prompt and advanced eastern island, in- 
deed, our own earlier and more protect- 
ive legislation could wisely be revived. 
Such legislation followed the open ex- 
p05»ure and abandonment of Freema- 
sonry about the year 1830, and manv a 
more recent victim would have been 
saved from disg-ust and regret if the law 
had become universal and had remained 
in force. The evil suppressed in the 
high school ought not to be tolerated in 
Chinatown, and the evil intolerable in 
both, ought not to infest the State capi- 
tol and the court room. 



QUESTION. 

A lodge had a waiver of jurisdiction of 
an E. A., and blackballed him for the sec- 
ond degree. Whose material is he and how- 
can he get the F. C. degree? 

ANSWER. 

He is the material of the lodge to which 
waiver of jurisdiction was granted. His 
relation to the first lodge was entirely sev- 
ered by the waiver of jurisdiction. He is 
an Entered Apprentice under the jurisdic- 



144 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



lion of the second lodge, and must bt? elect- 
.ed to the F. C. degree by it. I think a 
better plan is for a lodge to decide first 
whether it is willing to advance a candi- 
date, before it accepts Jurisdiction of him, 
but the law in this State does not describe 
the manner of giving or taking a waiver 
of jurisdiction. — Masonic Trowel. 

Of course he was lucky to be black- 
iDalled, but it it had been for his inter- 
.est to advance into the second degree, 
the "better plan" suggested might have 
.apjK^ared more just. Assuming the F. 
C. degree to be desirable, or at least de- 
;sired, it looks unfair to take a man from 
a lodge where he has been accepted once, 
and from which he is now passed in 
good standing, and then only suppress 
him. Perhaps only one ''brother of this 
entered apprentice voted against him ; 
some time he may be thanked for the 
rescue." 




WILLIAM KITELEY. 

On Thursday evening, April 8, 1909, 
at 10:30 o'clock, at his home near Sha- 
ron, Wis., occurred the death of Wil- 
liam Kiteley, aged 84 years, 7 months 
and 15 days. 

William Kiteley was born at Leighton- 
Buzzard, Bedfordshire, England, Aug. 
24, 1824. When 8 years of age he left 
the English home and came to America 



with his parents, who settled at Utrca, 
N. Y. In 1847 'he came to Sharon, Wis. 
In 1895 he married Mrs. Mary Webber, 
who survives him and who cared for 
him with marked attention and kindness 
during his last years. 

Mr. Kiteley was converted while yet a 
young man and became a member of the 
M. E. church, with which he remained 
until 1900, when (he united with the Free 
Methodist church, and remained in this 
communion unitil the time of his death. 
Deceased was a man of high ideals and 
unswerving integrity. With him the 
grace of Christianity increased as life ad- 
vanced. He was controlled by the true 
Christian spirit. While his life was quiet 
and unobtrusive, his interests and sym- 
pathies were, in an important sense, 
broad. He maintained to the last a 
deep interest in Christian Ibenevolences 
and moral reforms. He was a liberal 
supporter of foreign missions. Christian 
education, the prohibicion movement and 
the National Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies. 

Truly, a good man, a valuable citizen 
and a noble Christian has been taken 
from our midst. 



Cliristian love is a wonderful overlook- 
ing grace: it overlooks a multitude of 



sms. 



The Word of God is the only word 
the Christian warrior needs to slay the 
enemies of truth. 



Mm$ of §ur Pori 



MINUTES OHIO STATE CONVENTION. 

By Rev. Thomas Weyer, Recording 
Secretary. 

The Association met in the Assembly 
Room in the Court House at Lima, O., 
July 26, 1909, to discuss the subject of 
Secret Societies. 

The Scripture was read and prayer of- 
fered by Rev. S. H. Swartz, president of 
th^ National Christian Association. 

The address of welcome was delivered 
bv Elder G. A. Snider. Response by Rev. 
W- J. Sanderson, Cedarville, Ohio. 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard then addressed 



September, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



145 



the assembly on **The Church and the 
Lodge." 

Committees were appointed as follows : 
Resolutions, I. J. Rosenberger, S. H. 
Swarfz and Rev. C. W. Oyer; finance, 
Rev. F. Weyer, G. A. Snider and W. B. 
Stoddard; state work, Rev. A. Schumak- 
er, Rev. A. R. Horst and Rev. John 
Shank ; entertainment, Rev. D. F. 
Schultz and Rev. S. R. Overholtz; publi- . 
cation, Rev. C. H. Lenski and W. I. 
Phillips. 

Rev. S. H. Swartz then spoke some 
very feeling words on the foolishness of 
the Lodge and the mistake of many in 
dqDending upon it for salvation. 

Benediction by Elder Snider, and re- 
cess taken. 

Second Session. 

Convention assembled Tuesday morn- 
ing, July 27, at 9 o'clock. 

The meeting was called to order by 
the state president, Rev. W. J. Sander- 
son. Rev. S. P. Overholtz led the devo- 
tions. Rev. D. W. Lawrence and Rev. 
I. J. Rosenberger led in prayer. 

The state secretary not 'being present, 
Rev. T. Weyer was elected secretary pro 
tern. Rev. W. B. Stoddard read letters 
from albsent friends, as follows : H. R. 
Smith, Lennardsburg, O. ; James Stew- 
art, Belle Center, O. ; Chas. Blanchard, 
W'heaton, 111. ; S. A. Blessing, West Mil- 
ton, O. ; J. M. Schenk, Elida, O. ; Daniel 
Kauffman, Scottdale, Pa. ; M. J. Sander- 
son, Cedarville, O. ; T. W. Steward, 
Belle Center, O. ; J. Swank, Brookville, 
O. ; Blanche Harrington, Vaughnsville, 
O. ; S. P. Leon, Mansfield, O. ; Jesse 
Buck, Col. Grove, O. ; S. F. Hinman, 
Oberlin, O. ; A. B. Horset, Bellefontaine, 
O. ; J. W. Burton, New Albany, O. ; J. 
Hofiines, Etna, O. ; Frank Eberhart, 
Lima, O. ; Albert Schumaker, Pandora, 
O.. Henry Miller, Brookvi'lle, Ohio. 

Report of Committees. 

The Committee on State Work report- 
ed : There is encouragement in the 
growing sentiment in opposition to the 
lodges in this state. Notwithstanding 
the less careful multitudes are still going 
into various secret combinations. We be- 
lieve the number of those leaving be- 
cause of disgust or for other reasons is 
also much increased. As in other states 



many of our colleges and high schools 
are taking action to root out the evil 
fraternities which always work against 
the best student life. 

The Eastern secretary has worked 
with us more than two months during 
the year passed. He reports largely at- 
tended meetings and good additions to 
the Cynosure subscription list. 

We learn that there are several within 
our state who have lectured against 
secret societies and who would likely do 
so again on solicitation. We recommend 
Mr. J. M. Scott, Granville, O. ; Rev. R. 

C. H. Lenski, Anna, O. ; Rev. Wm. Dil- 
lon, D. D., Sprmgfield, O. ; Rev. W. G. 
Waddle, Cadiz, O. ; Rev. J. W. Burton, 
New Albany, O., and Rev. H. R. Smith, 
Leonardsburg, O., as men well fitted to 
lecture on this subject; and request our 
friends living near them to co-operate in 
holding meetings during the coming 
year. It was voted to accept and adopt 
the report. 

The Committee on Finance reported 
as Follows : Receipts, Mrs. M. A. Tem- 
pleton, $5; R. W. Stewart, $4; Rev. J. 

D. Allen, $1 ; T. W. Stewart, $2 ; cash, 
$1.75; Rev. S. P. Long, $1; H. Miller, 
$1 ; Rev. J. Hoffines, $1 ; D. W. Law- 
rence, $1 ; Rev. T. Weyer, $1 ; collec- 
tions, $29.28; received from treasurer 
balance of last year, $14.69 ; total, %62.'j2. 

Expenses: Postage and stationery, 
$1.45; express, 70c; distributing bills, 
75c; sign advertising, 75c; janitor, $5; 
press advertising, $3.60; Bro. Swartz, 
$16; Bro. Rosenberger, $2; Bro. Stod- 
dard, $15 ; Bro. Lenski, $1 ; chairs (rent), 
$1.50: meals, $1.25; total, $49. Balance 
his own wedding that he neglected to 
have his bride present, thus it is possi- 
ble for us to become so enamored with 
our schemes and theories as to lose sig^ht 
of the primary principles of this Associa- 
tion as were defined by the fathers. 

The Blanchards, Carpenters, Stod- 
dards, Kelloggs. Barlows and their kind, 
who met at Pittsburg in t868 to consider 
what could Ix* done to check the hioh 
tide of secret society encroachments, 
were men of mental breadth and culture : 
upon all moral questions they held intel- 
ligent views ; they were naturally all- 
round reformers, but left to others ques- 



146 



CHJRlSTlAiS CYNOSUKJi^. 



September, 1909. 



tion^ which required less heroism and 
addressed themselves at once to; antagon- 
izing the principles of sworn secrecy, as 
if this were the only purpose for which 
they were 'born. These were not blind 
fanatics, men of one idea, buf like the 
Apostle, who said, "This one thing I do. 
. . . T press toward the mark," they 
were specialists and chose to centralize 
their efforts for the accomplishment of a 
single purpose. 

The Wright brothers, who have re- 
cently acquired fame throughout all civ- 
ilized lands for their genius in the ac- 
complishment of aerial navigation, are 
the off-spring of a most noiblesire, who 
has for years been closely identified with 
our Association. These young men have 
voluntarily ostracized themselves from 
the outer world for the present and have 
chosen to "know nothing and to study 
nothing save the properties of the air and 
how, through mechanical appliances, to 
utilize it for the service of men. So ab- 
sorbed have these young men become 
with this one idea and so utterly obliv- 
ious to the outer world that it is said of 
them that when in Germany their bill of 
fare was aeroplanes stewed; in France 
aeroplanes fricasseed ; in Great Britain 
aeroplanes roasted, and that since reach- 
ing their home land they have chosen 
aeroplanes on ice. These men are de- 
voting .all their mental powers to the 
study of air problems, leaving others to 
master questions of geology, astronomy, 
'botany, etc. So it was with the veterans 
of anti-secrecy. Compromise, concessions 
and diplomacy were not found in their 
vocabulary; they trained their guns up- 
on their enemies and proved themselves 
good shots. 

' Would you view the self-sacrificing 
spirit of these men? Read the nth 
chapter of Hebrews. These men who 
chose to suffer affliction rather than to 
enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season — 
the fathers of anti-secrecy who were per- 
secuted, tempted, stoned, egged, and 
slain for the truth's sake. Our worthy 
president, C. A. Blan chard, Mr. Edmond 
Ronayne, the late Rev. James P. Stod- 
dard and others, while illustrating some 
of the elementary truths of Masonry, at 
an early day, in the city of Boston, were 



treated with the utmost indignity, the 
hall rioted and the speakers prohibited 
from concluding their addresses. All this 
in treasury, $13.72. The motion to ac- 
cept and adopt the report prevailed. 

Co'mmittee on Resolutions read its re- 
port, which was considered item by item 
and adopted as a whole. 

Resolutions. 

'Whereas, It is apparent that secret so- 
cities are often a menace to justice in 
our civil courts ; 

Whereas, Church attendance is on the 
decline and secret societies are on the 
increase, roibbing the Church o'f time, tal- 
ent and money and hence robbing God ; 

Whereas, Their influence has sown 
dissatisfaction in many homes. There- 
fore, be it resolved : 

Resolution I. We thank God for the 
organization of the National Christian 
Association by whose efforts it is made 
possible for the anti-secret forces to 
unite and mutually cooperate in conven- 
tion and otherwise in opposing the ruin- 
ous eft'orts of the secret empire of dark- 
ness. 

II. We deem the Christian Cyno- 
sure of great value as a polar star, a 
■waymark in directing Uhe anti-secret 
forces in their 'great conflict against the 
secret empire, and hence as a magazine, 
it wel'l deserves the support of those in 
sympathy with this reform movement. 
We consider that its present edition is 
doing, efficient work. 

III. We deem this religion of secret 
orders to be a shameful mockery. Many 
of them also administer extra judicial 
oaths, contrary to the civil laws and to 
the teaching of Christ. Many of them 
discard the name of Christ in their pray- 
ers and songs, and they all are respecters 
of color, clan or kind. 

^ IV. We deem them unworthy and 
sinful in the vain display in their re-, 
galia; these the Scriptures plainly for- 
bid; their assumed high titles are equal- 
ly vain and 'blasphemous. Think of such 
titles as High Priest, Noble Grand, Vice 
Grand, Union Past Grand, Sublime 
Grand Pontiff, etc., etc. These we deem 
contrary to the simphcity of our mild 
republican form of government as well 
as the gospel of Christ. 

V. No man can be a free loyal citizen 



September, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



147 



who holds the law of the lodge above the 
law of the land. 

VI. We believe that no church can 
build up the kingdom of Christ as it 
should, when either pastor or people are 
in lodge fellowship. 

VII. We believe no insurance or pro- 
vision for help of any kind in any need 
can compensate for the loss of the soul 
of those uniting in secret combinations. 

VIII. We therefore call upon all 
pastors and Christian believers every- 
where to join us in the dissemination of 
the revealed light and truth which our 
Association is putting forth. 

On motion the report on resolutions as 
a whole was adopted. - 

Officers. 

Reorganization was next in -order. 

Nominations were called for. On motion, 

Rev. W. J. Sanderson of Cedarville, O., 

was elected state president, to succeed 

himself. On motion Rev. G. A. Snider 

was elected vice-president. On motion 

Rev. T. Weyer of Lima, O., was elected 

state secretary. On motion Rev. J. M. 

L Faris was elected state treasurer. 

K Rev. W. B. Stoddard then gave his ad- 

W' dress on "What May an Outsider Know 

About the Lodge. 

After announcements the convention 
adjourned until 2 p. m. 

Afternoon Session. 

I The convention was called to order by 
the president, Rev. W. J. Sanderson. 
Rev. J. M. Faris led the devotional serv- 
ice. The. minutes were read, corrected 
and adopted. The matter of a place for 
holding the next annual meeting was 
presented. It was decided to leave it in 
the hands of the state president, vice- 
president and field secretary, Rev. W. J. 
Sanderson, G. A. Snider and Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard. 

Rev. R. C. H. Lenski read an excellent 
paper on "The Lodge and the Bible." 

On motion Rev. Lenski was requested 
to 'have the paper published in the 
Cynosure. 

Rev. Stoddard then read a letter from 
Rev. I. P. Robb, D. D., of Sydney, O., 
who expressed regret that he could not 
'be present to fill the place assigned him 
on the program. In the absence of Wm. 
I. Phillips, general secretary of the Na- 



tional Christian Association, whose name 
occurred on the program for an address 
on "Our Work," Rev. S. H. Swartz was 
called to speak on the same subject. His 
address was excellent. 

The question box was then opened and 
a number of questions of interest were 
asked and answered. 

The minutes of the afternoon session 
were read and approved. Convention ad- 
journed to meet at 7 130 in the evening. 

Thursday Evening Session. 

Convention was called to order by the 
president. In the absence of Rev. E. F. 
Dean of Findlay, O., Rev. D. D. Thomas 
led the devotion. 

• -Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, president of 
the National Christian Assocaition, de- 
livered a most excellent address on "The 
Home and the Lodge" to a large and at- 
tentive audience. 

Convention closed with sing'ing the 
doxology. Benediction by Rev. D. D. 
Thomas. 



EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS 
To the Ohio State Convention. 

New Albany, Ohio. 

I have yet to find an enthusiastic lodge 
man who is zealous in church work. 
Many good men hold membership in 
the lodge, but need light. 

The average pastor who undertakes to 
oppose the lodge does so without proper 
understanding and information, and his 
efforts are futile. Above all things else 
anti-lodge people need information and 
all who oppose the lodge should affiliate 
with the N. C. A. 

During the fourteen years of pastoral 
work I have had but two parishioners to 
unite with the lodge and they were not 
active in Christian work. 

J. W. Burton, 
Pastor U. B. Church. 



Sidney, Ohio. 
With man)' of the lodges there is a 
strong tendency to revert to animalism, 
and barbarism, and heathenism. Among 
Ihesq are the "Red Men," the "Order of 
Druids." the "Elks." the "Eagles." the 
"Owls." the "Gobblers," the^ "Geese." 
jM-csided over by the "Grand Gander," 
the "Monkevs," the "Serpent." etc. 

John P. Robb. 



148 



CHRISTIAN CYNUSUKE. 



September, 1909. 



Mansfield, O'hio. 
Let us pray God to send us a man of 
wealth who will furnish the Christian 
Cynosure to every preacher in this 
country to open Ihis eyes that he may 
lead others into the light. Yours truly, 

(Rev.) S. P. Long. 



il A 



Wheaton, Illinois. 
Fathers and Brethren: 

You are gathered in annual meeting 
once more to make a needed protest 
against the great iniquity of our time. 
There are many evils, but the evil of 
all evils is idolatry. Now, as of old, 
there are gods many and lords many, 
but to us there is but one God and He 
has revealed Himself in Jesus Christ, 
our Savior, and He is King of Kings and 
Lord of lords, and must refgn and will 
reign until every enemy is under His 

feet. 

A thoughtful man recently said : "The 
battle in this world has never been be- 
tween religion and infidelity; it has al- 
ways been between Christianity and re- 
ligions." It is religion which excludes 
Jesus Christ, which disregard^, tlie Word 
of God and which sets up gods whom 
our fathers did not know, that is doing 
the mischief in this world. 

We are religious beings by constitu- 
tion. Atheism has never been a popular 
belief, it is not now; but since the be- 
ginning men have been offering sacrifices 
which were not appointed on altars, 
vAikh were not of God. That is what 
the majority of men are doing now, and 
it brings all the shames and miseries 
that can be named into the fives of men. 
Idolatry will work in Ohio or Illinois ex- 
actly as it does in Africa or Asia. 

So far as you understand the mission 
to which you are called, you will witness 
for Jesus Christ against the unchristian 
and antichristian faiths of our time. The 
battle has been long and yet we do not 
see its close, but when it ends Jesus 
Christ will reign in this world. His 
saints will reign with Him and all His 
enemies will be put to confusion and 
shame. There is not the slightest doubt 
about this matter; therefore be strong 
and of good courage. Bear testimony 
in season and out of season ; in general 
religious assemblies ; special religious 



assemblies, newspapers of every name 
and kind; and bear in mind that each 
day God will give to each one of you 
some opportunity for testimony wfiich 
He is willing to bless. Sincerely and 
fraternally yours, 

Charles A. Blanchard. 



Y. M. C. A. DIRECTORS 

Taken to Task by Secretary of the 

National Christian Association. 

Lima, O., July 24, 1909. 
Editor Times- Democrat : 

Dear Sir: — As I am in charge of the 
arrangement for the Christian conference 
to give light on the subject of secret so- 
cieties, kindly allow me to say a few 
things regarding our coming conference^ 

The National Christian Association is 
an organization of Christians united to 
disseminate light regarding secret socie- 
ties. They are incorporated under the 
laws of Illinois and are therefore respon- 
sible for what they say and do. 

It may not be known to all your read- 
ers that there are at least twenty-eight 
Protestant churches having over 2,000,- 
000 members who disapprove of secret 
societies. Surely these Christians should 
be given a fair hearing. 

As has been published it is our expec- 
tation to hold a conference in your city. 

When arranging for this gathering I 
saw^ Mr. Frank Eberhart of the Y. M. C, 
A. I explained to him at length regard- 
ing our association, its work, how we 
conducted our meetings, etc. He rented 
us the Y. M. C. A. hall, taking part pay- 
ment and giving receipt for the same. 
We have, of course, advised friends as 
to the place of meeting. On returning 
to your city last evening I was told that 
Mr. Eberhart had published in my ab- 
sence that we could not have the hall for 
our conference. Later I found a lelter 
in the office from him to the same effect. 
In this letter he says : ''The board of 
directors have seriouslv objected to it." 

Calling to see Mr. Eberhart last even- 
ing we were told the directors were not 
pleased with the statements of the evan- 
gelists and statesmen regarding the 
lodges as they appear on our printed pro- 
gram and in your paper. It is not to be 
expected that all will see alike. But 
men with the reputation of Joseph Cook,. 



September, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



149 



Dwight L. Aloody, R. A. Torrey and 
John Ouincy Adams should be given a 
hearing and their statements considered 
on any question. It would seem strange 
that one company of Christians should 
refuse to carry out a contract made 
through their agent with another com- 
pany of Christians. Have these people 
something to hide? Something wrong 
they are afraid will become public ? We 
expect the Black Hand Society will try 
to hide, but it should be different with 
the followers of Him who ''in secret said 
nothing." 

We are aware that we could insist on 
our legal rights and hold our conference 
in the hall for which we have contracted 
and the rental of which we have partial- 
ly paid. Many of our conventions and 
conferences have been held in Y. M. C. 
A. halls, but it would seem the directors 
here do not wish us to have a hearing 
in their hall. We aim to give our views 
in a Christian manner and spirit. Light 
will only be offensive to those who love 
darkness. The Bible s'tates, "Men love 
darkness rather than light because their 
deeds are evil." If we are mistaken in 
our argument or conclusions let it be 
shown and we will at once abandoii our 
position. 

We have been granted the use of the 
court house assembly room and shall ex- 
pect to carry out our program as adver- 
tised at that place. 

This move of course makes us incon- 
venience and trouble, but we do not wish 
unnecessarily to trouble others. 

"Come and let us reason together." 

Conference opens at 7 130 Monday 
evening, July 26. 

W. B. Stoddard, 

Eastern Secretary, N. C. A. 
— Times-Democrat, Lima, O., July 24, 
1909. 



"TIMES=DEMOCRAT,'' LIMA, OHIO. 
On the State Convention. 

If the ears of the members of the 
various secret orders in the city are not 
burning vigorously to-day then the old 
adage is not true. 

At the meeting of the National Chris- 
tian Association, held in the assembly 
room of the court house, each and every 



secret order is being denounced in scath- 
ing and bitter terms. 

It would be funny if the speakers were 
not so terribly in earnest. Men of all 
ages, and from all Christian denomina- 
tions are taking part in the meeting,. 
which opened last night ; and Methodist^ 
Presbyterian, United Brethren, Lutheran 
even, are united in the stand against 
what they call the "Sinfulness and wick- 
edness of the secret orders." 

To the men who are on the inside of 
the secrets of the organizations against 
whidh this tirade is being made, the 
meetings would doubtless be amazing. 

How or where they have discovered 
or stumbled on the oaths of which they 
make so much is a query. But they 
seem to know whereof they speak. 

The room was filled, men and women- 
both being present, and a large number 
of Mennonites attesting their interest by 
their presence. The religious beliefs o£ 
the latter are very much against the tak- 
ing of oaths and their sympathy with a 
movement like this is unquestioned and 
expected. 

It is evident that the men who are 
talking are doing so from an earnest de- 
sire to convert others to their way of 
thinking, not because they want to cause 
a sensation, but because they really be- 
lieve devoutly in what they are saying. 
In fact, one reverend elder went so far 
as to assert that "A scourge would come 
down from heaven and lay waste the 
land should these societies not be made 
way with." 

Fortunately this is a free country, and 
each and every man has a right to his 
own opinions so long as he does not in- 
terfere with his neighbor. The Na- 
tional Christian Association has been la- 
boring- many years and has some good 
talent in its ranks. Men are present 
now in the city who are educated, well 
informed, and excellent speakers for the 
cause they think right and just. 

SECRETARY STODDARD'S LETTER. 



Dear Cynosure : 

I was sorry to note my report last 
month got a little mixed in the type, 
failing tb appear as sent. Friends will 
make allowance for mistakes. 

Weather in this section has been very 



150 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



dry. Corn prospects are not as good as 
elsewhere, the early crops were very 
good. 

My work for the month passed has 
been ia Ohio and Pennsylvania. Our 
conference at Lima, O., exceeded our 
'expectations. The local attendance was 
■:g^ood and the representation from the 
State very encouraging. I learned of 
several Lutheran pastors who came from 
a distance and incurred the expense of 
stopping at the hotels that they might 
help and be helped in this meeting. I 
believe from what I heard they were not 
disappo^inted. No little credit for our 
success is due to the lo'cal helpers. Elder 
G. A. Snider, Pastor Schultz, Brethren 
Overholtz, Weyer and others were very 
helpful. Meetings in the Pleasant View 
Church of the Brethren, and the Pike 
Memonite were largely attended and 
very helpful. On Sabbath, July 25, I 
spoke four times in Lima. At the Church 
of the Brethren in the A. M. the Men- 
nonite and rescue missions in the after- 
noon and in the evening to a larger con- 
gregatio'U iin the Church of the Brethren. 

The folly of the Y. M. C. A. directors 
was apparent to all who recognized 
cause and effect. The breaking of their 
agreement with us did not raise them in 
the estimation of Christian people, and 
likely added tO' the attendance at the con- 
ference. They could not prevent the 
testimonies of Joseph Cook, Dwight L. 
Mioody 'and others of, Hke conscience be- 
coming known, try as best they could. 
Very naturally, the people asked why do 
these lodge Y. M. C. A. directors seek 
to cover up what these God-honored men 
have said ? Surely men ''who love dark- 
ness rather than light" are not the men 
to direct in any Christian enterprise. A 
nig'ht was very pleasantly spent at the 
home of our good friends at Leonards- 
burg, Ohio. The Smiths are not all op- 
posed to the lodge, but no one is left in 
doubt as to the position of those at 
Leonardsburg, O. 

While passing Columbus, O., I stopped 
long enough to secure the subscription 
of a Smith (Byron Smith) who is letting 
his light shine on the southwest side of 
the city. Brother Burton of New Al- 
bany, O., met me at the trolley and con- 
veyed me to his home, where I found, 



owing to his dihgence, ''all things were 
ready." The people were there in large 
numbers, all I had to do was to make the 
address and take the subscriptions to the 
Cynosure. It was reported that the 
Lodge people were not a little stirred. It 
is hoped some were converted. Why 
don't you friends near Columbus, O., 
write to Rev. J. W. Burton, New Al- 
bany, O., and get Mm to give you an 
anti-lodge address? He will give what 
you would like, I am sure. 

I am now working at camp meetings. 
Last week the Radical U. B. Camp 
Kauffman, Pa., now the Union Christian 
Camp, in C. F. Kreider's grove, near 
here. These people are friendly to the 
N. C. A. and give opportunity for ad- 
dress and canvass. ' . 

Not so many subscribe for the Cyno- 
sure as your representative thinks should, 
but there are always a goodly number 
who support in this way. Some say I 
don't belong to the lodge and don't want 
to know anything albout them. The 
farmers might say, there are no crows in 
my field pulling up the corn, I don't care, 
if there is a big flock in my neighbor's 
field! What would we say of such a 
farmer? These camp meetings always 
give spiritual help. Both the camps I 
have attended have more present than 
in other years. There were some con- 
versions at Kauffman's. I have been per- 
mitted to show the superiority of the 
•church to the lodge at large gatherings 
in the Church of the Brethren at 
Waynesboro and Chambersburg, Pa. If 
I mistake not, these meetings will be 
moTe than ordinarily fruitful. In the 
Radical U. B. church, Waynesboro, I 
preached twice to good audiences. Bro. 
Brub^aker, the pastor, is a faithful man 
of God, who proclaims much needed 
truth. A number of addresses have been 
given at the camps. I hasten to the 
woods when this is written to give the 
address promised this morning. I wish 
I could mention all the people who are 
kind to me, but that is out of the ques- 
tion. God bless them all. 

Never was I more confident that our 
cause was to succeed. It's born of 
heaven and all hell can't stop it. 

Let us press on to victory. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



September, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



151 



P. S. — Rev. H. G. Light gives me a 
home whi'le 'here. I think he is well 
named. He preache's to the United Zions' 
children and they don't ibeHeve in the 
lodges. He tells me that a man by the 
name of Brenser (^id not like something 
connected with the Brethren in Christ 
(River Brethren ) some fifty years ago 
and so started out wlith a new church 
(the United Zion Children). It is to be 
hoped they are all good children. 

MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine BlufY, Ark., Aug. lo, 1909. 
Rev. William I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother : I have just come from 
the Central District Association, the 
Baptist Woman's Association. It was a 
great meeting for Christ. We stood out 
against everything that was wrong, and 
had some of our best ministers to back 
up our teaching. We came out against 
whisky, lodges, divorces, dancing, card 
parties and Saturday and moonlight pic- 
nics. 

Brother Pliillips, we women are stand- 
ing by the Bible. We have found out 
what is right and we are going to do 
right. We want pure men in the pulpit 
to lead us ; and we don't want lodge-men 
and whisky men to lead us. We want 
men to lead us •w'ho have ''stood in My 
counsel" and "caused My people to hear 
My words." (Jerem.iah 23:22.) It takes 
the Word of God to turn men from evil. 
None can hide from God in secret places 
(see verse 24. ) Read verses 26 to 30 of 
this chapter. 

What is the matter with the watch- 
men? Are they blind? See Isaiah 
56:10-12. Don't the ministers of to-day 
see the destruction in our land? Can't 
they see the lodges carrying the young 
people away, first by giving dances, and 
then going on from bad to worse? And 
then wonder what is the matter with us, 
why we cannot have a revival, and why 
has the Lord cast away His people? Here 
is the answer: Isaiah 59:1-15. Notice 
verse 4. 

I heard one of our great preachers at 
the Association say that he had a talk 
with a Methodist preacher about lodges. 
The Methodist preacher said: ''You 
Baptist preachers have given up your 
lodges. We were glad of it, for we 



thought it would give us a whack at all 
the money; but we see now that the 
lodge is hurting the Methodist church 
as well as the Baptist church." He said : 
"I never could get a cent of money from 
a Baptist until I got him into the lodge ; 
so I was glad when you Baptists quit, 
because we Methodists saw a better 
prospect for money. But now we are 
sick of the lodges. We love the church 
and we can see her being deserted. Only 
a faithful few will come to the church 
nowadays." A person can see the evil 
in the lodges from this conversation be- 
tween these two preachers. 

I can see that "the righteous perish- 
eth" (Isaiah 57th chapter). God wants 
somebody to "cry aloud" and "spare 
not" and "show^ My people their trans- 
gression" (Isaiah 58:1). I can see the 
"greedy dogs which can never have 
enough" (Isaiah 56:11). But God re- 
bukes them (see Isaiah 57:3-12). These 
leaders are "like the foxes in the deserts" 
(see Ezekiel 13th chapter). Oh, 
Brotlicr Phillips, fight on against the 
wrong, and we shall be delivered. 

A preacher's wife said to me not long 
ago, "Sister Woods, you might just as 
well quit fighting the lodges. You never 
can break them down." I said, "Yes, 
that is what Rab-shakeh said to King 
Hezekiah's men" (2 Kings 19:28-35!. 
Notice in verse 6 of the same chapter 
what God said through His servant 
Isaiah. I said, "My sister, I am not try- 
mg to break up the lodges, neither is 
the National Christian Association try- 
ing to break them up. We are like 
Isaiah, only God's servants warning 
God's people to separate themselves frorn 
the world. Then God will bring destruc- 
tion upon the world and the lodges with 
it. He just wants to get Lot oiit of So- 
dom, and then He will break the whole 
thing up. The Lord is telling us to 
hasten, as He did Lot, for He is going to 
destroy Sodom." See Genesis i'9:22-25. 
I said, "Listen, sister, to what God said 
to Jeremiah: "Be not afraid of their 
faces; for I am with thee to deliver 
thee, saith the Lord' (Jeremiah 1:8). 
Read the 6th and 7th verses of the same 
chapter. Jeremiah said he was a child. 
You know a child cannot do nuich of 
anything but talk. So that is what God 



152 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



wants us to do — talk. I have given my 
life to Him, and I am going to talk 
about lodges, whisky and whoredom and 
everything else that is not in keeping 
with God's Word. You might just as 
well say to the preacher, 'Don't preach 
any more ; there are so many sinners you 
might just as well quit.' " 

You see. Brother Phillips, this woman 
was against lodges, but she was thinking 
about herself and that made her doubt. 
I said to her, ''All hell may come against 
the church, but they shall not prevail 
(Matthew i6:i8; Jeremiah 1:19). The 
church is a defenced city, and an iron 
pillar, and a brazen wall, against the 
whole land" (Jeremiah 1:18). I said. 
""The Lord has touched the mouth of 
His servants (verse 9) and set them 
over the nations (verse 10). The Lord 
said in verse 16, T will utter My judg- 
ments against them touching all their 
wickedness, who have forsaken me.' " 

God bless you, and may God help 
your board of officers to "throw out the 
life-time." Don't be discou raged, for the 
people are gradually coming out of the 
lodges. 

We are still fighting whisky. We 
would have gotten whisky out of Pine 
Bluff at the last election, but most of the 
preachers helped the saloons by keeping 
their mouths shut. One preacher saw 
me with some temperance tracts and 
said: "Sister Woods, the preachers are 
not allowed to distribute tracts here. 
We have been told that it will not be 
good for us." I said, "Well, brother, 
Jesus set me free ; I don't belong to these 
whisky men, I belong to God, and God 
wants the people tO' know the curse of 
liquor, and that is why I am giving out 
these tracts." He said, "They wiii kill 
you." I said, "Well, the Lord said, 'Be 
thou faithful unto death, and I will give 
thee a crown of life' ; so as I have not 
got to death yet, I will give out a few 
more." Yours for Christ's service, 

Lizzie Woods. 



KENTUCKY KEEPING AWAKE. 

Pikeville, Ky., Aug. 3, 1909. 
Dear Brother Phillips : 

Greetings in the name of Tesus. We 
are still above the storm and waves of 
persecutions and standing on the rock 



of external ages, and our Captain has not 
deserted us, but on the other hand, is 
bringing us out more than conquerors. 
The devil is disturbed from th« center 
of our county to the circumference. We 
have been holding meetings most every 
Sunday in the country around our town 
in schoolhoiuses and wherever the Lord 
directs. 

It is wonderful how the dear Lord 
is blessing us. Praise God. We have 
got our face towards the New Jerusalem 
and have God for our Father and Jesus 
lor our Elder Brother and the Holy 
Ghost for our Comforter and are fully 
equipped to stand agamst all the wiles 
of the devil. 

We have been holding meetings about 
two miles above our town on the river, 
and the lodge question has been agitated 
so strongly along with all other current 
evils of to-day that the enemy has con- 
spired against us and closed the doors 
against the meeting, but we can see 
God's hand in it. We are expecting to 
go to work at once and by the help of 
cur Father build a little church in this 
neighborhood. We are few in number, 
but He that is for us is more than all 
that can be against us. We ask the 
prayers of God's people that God will 
send in the necessary funds for the 
building of this house. Praise God, I 
am more determined to go on than ever 
before. 

We are still crying against the great 
lodge evil of our town and having silent 
meetings. It is wonderful how God is 
blessing us and sending the truth home 
to hearts. Several have left the craft, 
and others are almost persuaded to come 
out from among them. 

May God help us to be true and fight 
the good fight of faith and preach the 
Word fearless of man or devil. 

We are distributing lodge books and 
all kinds of literature and the thing is 
going like wild-fire. God can work and 
none can hinder. The lodge preachers 
are spiritually dead in our town, and 
haven't had a revival since the lodge 
questions have been agitated. Many of 
their churches have gone dry and God 
has departed from them. 

I am fully persuaded that you are do- 
ing a great work, one that is unequalled 



September, 1909. 



CHKlSriAN CYNU5SUKE. 



152 



in our nation. May the dear Lord con- 
tinue to bless and keep you. Some day 
it will be said, ''Wdl done, good and 
faithful servant : thou hast been faithful 
over a few things, I will make thee ruler 
over many things." 

We are unpopular here, so was our 
Master, but we will be popular in heaven. 
I am going through. 

Your brother saved, sanctified and 
satisfied. A. D. Cline. 



■rom ®ur ItatL 



ENCOURAGING WORDS. 

''House of Praise," Butler, Pa. 

Dear Brethren — If you have tracts 
for free distribution, will be very glad to 
scatter some. 

Your convention here in Butler was 
the means of saving several young men 
from lodges. One very promising boy 
of fifteen attended the meetings, and 
when he learned that the M. E. preacher 
was a Mason, he went to an elderly wo- 
man and told her this : "I don't know 
why it is, but I don't believe God wants 
me to listen to that man preach any 
more." 

May the Lord lay it upon the hearts 
of many spirit-filled men to expose and 
speak against this soul destroying evil. 

Yours in Jesus' dear name, till He 
comes. Mary E. Barrett. 



Kansas City, Mo., Aug. 2, 1909. 

Dear Sir — I have read vour "Mod- 
ern Secret Societies" and am very much 
pleased with the views in it. 

I have been a Blue Lodge Mason, but 
have come out. 

I 'have also studied Edersheim on Jew- 
ish societies and I think Masonry a 
wicked, misleading and subtle instru- 
ment in the hands of the Devil to lead 
people into a false religion and to damn 
their souls eternally. 

De Courcey Saxton. 



Carona, N. Y. 

'My 'Dear Bro. Phillips: I have re- 
ceived the copies of the Christian 
Cynosure you sent me by express. 

I have distributed a-bout 400 Cyno- 
sures in 400 homes in Corona and I 



have not gone over half the city yet, but 
I hope to continue the good work. 

Charles A. Lagville. 

LEAVES CHURCH FOR LODGE. 

lulitor Cynosure : Called to conduct 
the funeral of a stranger recently, I 
found that he had been, nineteen years 
ago, a member of the Presbyterian 
church and with his wife had dropped 
away about that time. Since then they 
had gone to church a little, but, and this 
is the point to this letter, he had all these 
nineteen years maintained his connec- 
tion with the lodge. He dropped away 
from the church and held to the lodge. 

This is the sad situation with multi- 
tudes ; and bishops, and presiding elders'^ 
and ministers, by the thousands and 
thousands are verily guilty of supporting 
institutions which destroy souls. 

F. M. Foster.. 
New York Citv. 



MASONS TAKE NOTICE. 

Dear Cynosure: We are frequently- 
told that to be a good Christian one 
must be a good Mason. This is quite 
new to me, and if true here is a big ripe 
field for the lodge missionary. 

The degrees of Christian goodness dif- 
fer very widely and if there is such a 
thing as a Christian Freemason, will he 
not in his devotion to Christianity,, 
through his "brotherly kindness," let us 
know what there is in the lodge to im- 
prove Christians? 

If any Mason, minister or layn»an 
who does not wish to spread this new 
gospel, will tell it to me, 'T seriously de- 
clare upon my honor before these gen- 
tlemen," that if I find anything in it 
helpful in au)^ way to this Christian life^ 
I shall "always conceal and never re- 
veal," on pain of any damage to my 
body, soul or estate, which Masons claim 
right to inflict. 

Joseph McKee. 
Alleglieny, Pa., 1216 Buena Vista St. 

A STRANGE MIXTURE. 

On page 156, current issue of "The 
Literary Digest," is an article on the 
su'bject of help for country boys, in 
which it is set forth that the most ef- 
fective way to reach and help these 
young men is through the Y. M. C. A., 



154 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUUE. 



September, 1909. 



which, as an organization, has been of 
late branching out in this direction. After 
setting forth the advantages of this work 
by various illustrations of the success 
of the work in different localities the 
article gives an instance in a certain town 
in Iowa. I quote : 

''At Grand Junction, Iowa, the largest 
•class is made up of the 'members of the 
Masonic lodge, who are studying" the 
life of Ghri'St, from His birth to His res- 
urrection, a-s typified in the old temple 
worship." 

The question is, how these young men, 
avowedly members of the Masonic sys- 
tem, which openly denies Jesus Christ 
as only Savior and Redeemer of men, 
can, through the Y. M. C. A., study His 
'birth and resurrection with spiritual 
profit or desire. We are afraid of a lot 
of other so-called Christian efiforts being 
tried in these last days. 

(Rev.) H. A. Day. 



THE WORK IN SOUTH AFRICA. 
A Seceder's Testimony. 

Port Elizabeth, South Africa, 
June 21, 1909. 
The Editor of Christian Cynosure : 

Dear Sir — A little booklet called 
''Mystical Life and House Top Procla- 
mation," was put into my (hands the 
other day by a missionary from America 
named De Weered, who is connected 
with the Holiness Union, and I was 
very much taken with it, because the 
Spirit of God 'has brought me out of 
the darkness of Masonry, and this was 
one of the first books or publications 
anti-Masonic I had ever seen. I may say 
it is now about 18 months since I 
was first exercised about Masonry. I 
feel that my testimony and walk as 
a lover of our Lord Jesus Christ and a 
child of God should be against the 
lodge. • 

I was 24 years a Mason and had risen 
to a Past Master in the Blue Lodge and 
First Past-Principal in the Royal Arch. 
I felt tihere was something wrong, but 
I could not say what, or where it was, 
but Mr. Fred T. Frye, another mis- 
sionary, showed me w'here Masonry was 



'Up against salvation through the blood 
only. And the Lord in His mercy gave 
me grace to resign my connection with 
all the lodges I was connected with. 

I enclose a copy of resignation which 
I sent to the Craft Lodges and the Royal 
Ardh Ghapters, but none of them dared 
to 'have it read out. It was simply stated 
that Wors'hipful Bro. Braybrooke had re- 
signed for religious reasons. I met the 
Master of one of the lodges a few 
days after and asked him why 'he did 
■not have my resignation read out as I 
requested? He said. You know we dare 
not have any religious discussion in the 
lodge. I might say that ithere are only 
two of us here who are going, by God's 
help, to fight against the Masonic Beast, 
and I want you to Ihe'lp me in the way of 
giving me a list of books, or pamphlets 
for distribution, that would help us in 
this work. I have taken 'the liberty of 
writing to you, because if the Christian 
Cynosure is opposed to Masonry in 
Am'erica, it will be the same in Africa. 
Yours in Christ Jesus, 

James B'raybrooke. 
Copy of Resignation : 

"Having by t'he grace of God been 
brought into a fuller knowledge of the 
truth oif 'the gospel of the Lord Jesus 
Christ and reahzing that Free Masonry 
is antagonistic to the doctrine 'of our 
Blessed Lord Jesus, I have no option 
therefore, but to resign my membership 
of the order and request t'hat my name 
be erased from the books of the order 
and that this resignation be read in open 
lod'ge assembled. 

'7^"^es Braybrooke." 

"First Past- Principal Agerubbable 
Caledonia, R. A. Chapter No. 301, 'S. 
C; Companion, Port Elizabeth, R. A. 
Chapter No. 711, 'E. C' ; Past Master, 
Lodge Caledonia No. 796, 'S. C' ; Past 
Master, Lodge Balmoral No. 962, 'S. 
C; Past Junior Warden, Lodge South- 
ern Cross No. 1590, 'E. C' " 

ONE YEAR'S LODGE EXPERIENCE, 
And Why I Left It. 

In writing up my lodge experience, I 
wish to say that it is with "Malice 
toward none, good will to all." It is not 
my desire to create any controversy with 
the lodges as such. 

My position in a few words is this : I 



September, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



155 



believe the whole secret society principle 
is unscriptimal and unchristian. If we 
as minisiters and members of churches 
join the various lodges, or use our in- 
fluence to build them up, we are not 
properly representing Him who said "I 
spake openly to the world ; I ever taught 
in the synagogue, and in the temple, 
whither the Jews always resoTt; and in 
secret have I said nothing." In joining 
and using our influence for the lodges, 
we are not only doing an injustice to the 
church, but to the lodge as well. In other 
words, when a lodge member joins the 
church he is out of his place, and every 
God-fearing minister and Christian 
should take a decided position and op- 
pose it, in the spirit of Christ. 

While engaged in business in Michi- 
gan years ago, I found that many of 
the leading business men, with whom I 
was associajted, were members of certain 
lodges. I saw ministers, leading church 
members, and men well up in society, 
who were leading men in the lodge, and 
so I naturally concluded it must be prop- 
er for the Christian to unite. One night 
in January, 1880, found me with a friend 
in 'the ante-room, where we were dulv 
blindfolded, and they proceeded to ini- 
tiate us. We were yanked aroiuid the 
hall as fast as we could run ; we were 
duly punched with swords, spears, and 
struck with leather scourges. My friend 
succeeded in getting through without 
breaking his leg by the breaking of the 
spear. My first 'thought was "Nothing 
very Chrisft-like in that." I do not wish 
to say any more respecting the initia- 
tion. 'Tor it is a shame even to speak 
of those things which are done of them 
in secret." 

While I felt there were many ^things 
not at all in keeping with the solemnity 
of Bible religion, yet there were some 
things that were proper and in them- 
selves were not harmful, so I decided to 
overlook the ridiculous part and affiliated 
with them for about one year and was re- 
spected and soon placed in oflice. In 
some respects, I rather enjoyed it, but one 
thing worried me and that was in the re- 
ligious ceremonies : Chrisi: was not men- 
tioned, He was never spoken of as ihe 
sinner's only hope. 

"What," says one: "I supposed the 



lodge was a religious institution and no 
one, who did no>t believe in a Supreme 
Ruler could unite.'* That is true and I 
never saw a lodge opened without the 
Chaplain reading or repeating: "Su- 
preme Ruler, strengthen our hands in 
building up this order. Aid us in carry- 
ing out the great principles of fraternity 
which underlie it. Assist us in bringing 
peace on earth and good will toward 
men." There was much which is in- 
tended to exalt the lodge, but nothing 
about Jesus Christ. 

Not long after becoming a member, 
our Chaplain was absent one night, and 
a, "worthy member" who was very pro- 
fane and ridiculed the Christian religion 
outside the lodge, acted as Chaplain pro 
tem, and repeated : "Supreme Ruler, 
strengthen our hands in building up tliis 
order, etc." This was a shock to me and 
brought to mind 2 Timothy 3 15 . "Hav- 
ing a form of godliness, but denying the 
power thereof: from such turn away." 

These things worried me very much, 
for I could see that the obligations of the 
lodge are ait war with the family and the 
church, although some of my associa- 
tions in the lodge were very pleasant, yet 
I must say, I never participated in the 
initiation of members but my conscience 
condemned. The general tendency of 
the lodge is to divert the mind from the 
solemnity of Bible themes. I soon be- 
came so much more interested in lodge 
than lin church work that I would not go 
three blocks to prayer meeting, but I 
would go six miles to the lodge. 

There were many things in lodge work 
that I could not harmonize with my 
views of such Bible truths, for instance, 
as "Ye cannot drink the cup of the Lord 
and the cup of devils : ye cannot be par- 
takers of the Lord's table, and the table 
of devils." 

During the year, I was connected with 
the lodge, I do not recall of ever having 
participated in the Lord's supper, I felt 
it was inconsistent. I felt I was doing 
that which my Bible condemned. I knew 
I was backsliding from God, yet there 
was a fascination about the lodge which 
seemed to iiold me. There were in- 
fluences from which it was hard to 
break away. 

In my next I will speak more of the 



156 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



inconaisitency of ministers and Christians 
using their influence for the upbuilding 
of the lodge. 

Geo. C. States. 



HENRY AND THE GOAT. 

Well, wife, I've joined the F. M. C. 

My stars! that goat beat all! 
Away he went up hill and down 

Around that little hall. 
My feelings suffered, more or less — 

I cannot tell you how — 
For 'neath a blood-stained battle-ax 

I made a solemn vow. 

I've heard the stories Masons tell 

'Bout Morgan's awful fate. 
And how so many fearful things 

Befall the candidate — 
They play a kind of funeral march 

And claps of thunder roll; 
And then he seems about to sink 

Into a blazing hole. 

These things, you know, all came to mind 

As I was passing through — 
Till cheering words dispelled my fears 

And made me think of you. 
They told about dear ones at home 

The brevity of life — 
How through this order can be had 

Protection for the wife. 

But when they took my blinders off 

And everything was done, 
I realized then how all the rest 

But me, enjoyed the fun. 
Old friends were there, and Pastor Brown, 

He gladly welcomed me; 
And smiling said: "Now get your wife 

To join the F. M. C " 

Walter Allen Rice, in Society Paper. 



A CRIME TO PRINT RITUALS. 

L. B. Houck, of Mt. Vernon, Grand 
Master of the Ohio Odd Fellows, said 
here yesterday that he would urge the 
passage of a bill next winter making 
it a crime for any one to print copies of 
secret societies' rituals and other secret 
forms without authority of the organi- 
zation. In his annual report which will 
be presented to the state meeting of Odd 
Fellows to be held in Toledo, June 15, 
Grand Master Houck will give his expe- 
rience with *'fake" rituals during the 
past year. 

Grand Secretary C. H. Lyman, of 
Columbus, will show in his annual re- 
port at that meeting that six new 



lodges have been instituted during the 
year and that 365 members have been 
initiated. There are now 83,268 mem- 
!bers in the state. During the year the 
lodges under this jurisdiction have ex- 
pended in benefits, $287,627. 



KNIGHTS OF THE MACCABEES. 

Port Huron, Mich., Riverside Printing 

Co., Printers and Binders, 1902. 
Extracts from Ritual, Edition of 1902. 

Opening — (All officers, when address- 
ed, must immediately give "token of sin- 
cerity," and the officers -addressing them 
should not proceed until they have done 
so. (The Com'mander takes his station, 
gives two raps with gavel). 

COMMANDER— Sir Knight Picket 
(Picket gives token of sincerity 
standing). Advance to the altar, sound 
the trumpet and retire. (Picket (ad- 
vances to the altar and gives three loud 
blasts on trumpet, at which sound offi- 
cers and imembers take their respective 
positions, all standing. Packet then re- 
tires to ante-room, by way of the ser- 
geant's station.) 

COMMANDE R— Attention, Sir 
Knights, (At this command all members 
give "token of sincerity") prepare for 
action. 

LIEUT. COMMANDER— Sir 
Knig'ht Record Keeper, call the roll of 
officers. (R. K. gives '"token of sin- 
cerity" and calls -roll of officers, by offi- 
cial title only, from officer's roll-book. 
The Master- at- Arms answers "Present" 
or "Absent," as the case may be. The 
R. K. checks list and reports absentees ; 
and the Commander fills the vacancies 
pro tem. The R. K. makes a record 
thereof. After all stations are filled 
sentinel will admit no one until the Tent 
is ready for action.) 

COMMANDER— Sir Knight Ser- 
geant, report to this station and com- 
municate the passwords. 

SERGEANT (gives "token of sin- 
cerity" and says) : Sir Knight First Mas- 
ter of the Guard, take his station. (He 
then goes to Commander's station by 
way of the first Commander's station 
and communicates the semi-annual pass- 
word in regular form.) 

COMMANDER— The words are cor- 



September, 1909. 



CHKISTIAN CYNOSUUE. 



157 



rect; return to your station. (Sergeant 
returns by w^ay of Ohap Iain's station.) 

LIEUT. COM.— Sir Knight Sergeant, 
'have the Sentinel and the Picket been 
placed ? 

SERGEANT (gives ''token of sin- 
cerity") — They have, Sir Knight Lieut. 
Com. 

LIEUT. COM. — Are they in posses- 
sion of the password? 

SERGEANT — I will ascertain and re- 
port. Sir Knight Sentinel relieves the 
Picket and instructs him to report to 
his station. (The Sentinel enters ante- 
room and fakes the Picket's station and 
instructs that officer to report to Ser- 
geant. Picket reports to Sergeant from 
in front of his station, and communicates 
semi-annual password in regular form. 
Picket should remain standing in front 
of Sergeant's station until ordered to 
relieve Sentinel.) 

SERGEANT— Sir Kniglht Picket, the 
words are correct. Relieve the Sentinel 
and instruct him to report to this sta- 
tion. (Picket retires and instructs Sen- 
tinel.) 

SERGEANT— Sir Knight Sentinel, 
the words are correct. Return, guard 
well the inner door, allow no one to pass 
without giving the proper signal, and 
password, or obtaining permission. 
(Sentinel resumes his station.) 

SERGEANT— Sir Knight Lieut. 
Commander, the Sentinel and the Picket 
are in possession of the proper pass- 
words. 

LIEUT. COMMANDER— 'Tis well. 
See that the approaches are continually 
guarded. Allow no one to pass the in- 
ner door not in possession of the pass- 
words, without permission. You will 
now ascertain, ithroug^h the Guards, that 
all present are qualified to remain. 

SERGEANT— Sir Knight Guards, 
communicate the passwords. (At the 
words ''Sir night Guards, the Guards 
will respond with the "token of sincer- 
ity," and after instructed to communi- 
cate the passwords they should step 
down in front of the Sergeant and com- 
municate the passwords in regular form, 
after which they should remain stand- 
ing, facing the Sergeant until further 
instructed.) The words are correct. 



You will now ascertain that all present 
are quahfied to remain. (The first M. 
of G., etc.) 

FIRST MASTER OF GUARD— Sir 
Knight Sergeant, I have examined my 
charge and find all in possession of pass- 
words. 

SECOND MASTER OF GUARD— 
Same as First Master of Guard. 

SERGEANT— 'Tis well, return to 
your stations. (Guards then return to 
their stations, by walks at sides of tent.) 

SERGEANT— Sir Knight Lieut. 
Com., ail present are qualified to re- 
main. 

C O M M A N D E R— Attention, Sir 
Knights, attend the Chaplain's invoca- 
tion. (As Stewards, etc.) 
Prayer. 

CHAPLAIN — Supreme Ruler, 
strengthen our hands in building up the 
Order. Aid us in carrying out the great 
principles of fraternity, which underlie 
it. Aid us in bringing peace on earth 
and good will towards men. May the 
deliberation of this body be conducted in 
that spirit of harmony so necessary to 
success. May our Order grow and pros- 
per. May its usefulness be enlarged 
and its protecting arms extended so that 
we may be better able to provide for the 
widow, protect the orphan and care for 
those dependent upon us. May we so 
speak and act as not to bring reproach 
upon the Order nor disgrace any of its 
humane principles. Make us a power 
for good in this land, and worthy ex- 
ponents of the brotherhood of man. 
(Chaplain returns to his station by the 
way which he came.) 

COMMANDER— Sir Knights, join in 
the opening ode, etc. 

COMMANDER— Sir Knight Lieut. 
Commander, take this station. Sir 
Kniglht Past Commander, Chaplain and 
Sergeants, advance to the altar, while 
all unite in giving the signs and words. 
(When each officer is named he should 
respond with the "token of sincerity," 
and as directed, advance to the altar 
where each places his left hand on the 
book and the circle. While in that po- 
sition the Commander extends his right 
hand to Sergeant, who grasps it with 
his rig^ht. The Past Commander and 



158 



OHKiJSTlAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



Chaplain also 'olasp hands in the same 
way. They pause a moment, then step 
backward three short steps when the 
Commander calls for, and with the Ser- 
geant gives, signs and words in the fol- 
lowing order, the Past Commiander and 
the Chaiplain giving the answers. All 
members join in signs, words and an- 
swers thereto. ) 

COMMANDER— 5/^/> and salutation 
sign, Recognition sign, Its answ en:, La- 
dles' Recognition sign, Its answer. Tok- 
en of Sincerity, Distress sign. Its answer. 
Distress words. (Given by all but Past 
Commander and Chaplain.) The answer 
(given by all but Commander and Ser- 
geant). Ladies' Distress sign, its an- 
swer; Ladies' Distress Word, its answer. 

COMMANDER— What is the per- 
manent password ? SERGEANT — - 
U R L L RL T X R. COMMANDER-^ 
When is it to be used ? SERGEANT-^ 
When visiting a Tent, if required^ i. 
COMMANDER— Give us the test word. 
SERGEANT— F. COMMANDER— 
M; SERGEANT— M; COM.— Y; 
SERG.— R ; Com.— H ; SERG.— H ; 
COM.— R; SERG.— U; SERG.— 
EMM; COM,.— YRH; SERG.— HRU; 
SERG.— FMMYRHHRU. 

COMMANDER— 'Tis well, return to 
your stations. (The four officers resume 
their stations, by the way they came.) 

COMMANDER— In the name of Ju- 
das Maccabeus, the liberator of his peo- 
ple, and with a firm belief in the broth- 
ei'hood of man, I, as Commander of this 
Tenit, now declare it open and ready for 
action. (Command'er gives rap with the 
gavel, and all s^at themselves.) 
Order of Business. 

I. Roading, correcting and approving 
of records. 2. Reading of communica- 
tions, notices and bills. 3. Applications 
for membership, and their reference to 
Committees of Investigation. 4. Re- 
port of Committees on Investigation. 5. 
Balloting for candidates. 7. Payment 
of dues and assessments. 8. Reports 
of sickness or distress. 9. Report of 
Committees' (standing and spe'cial). 10. 
Unfinished business. 11. New business. 
12. Report of suspensions and rein^taLte-' 
ments since last report. 13. Record 
Keeper's report of receipts atid disburse- 
ments since last report. 14. Does any 



Sir Knight know of a Sir Knight who 
is out of work and wishes employment? 
15. Does any Sir Knight know of any 
employment for a Sir Knight who is 
out of work? 16. Good of the Order. 
17. Close, in regular form. ( See page 
56. for closing ceremony.) (14.) 
Initiation. 

Amplified form — ^First Section. When 
the degree is conferred on more than one 
candidate, great care should be (taken) 
* observed in the use of plurals. Never 
address a number of candidates as if 
you were speaking to but one of them. 
No Tent should sacrifice the effective- 
ness of its "team" by excluding any 
new and able 'member who is willing to 
take part. The Tents :sho'uld be so ar- 
ranged that all Sir Knig<hts can see the 
work without being themselves seen by 
the candidate. This is acoomplished by 
hanging a thiick curtain across at head 
,;pf Tent. These curtains should be sus- 
pended by, etc. 

Actors and Properties. 

KING ANTIO'CHUS — Wearing 
crown and coat of mail reaching to his 
knees, official robe of office, grey or 
brown wig, and beard, flesh colored long 
hose, sandals strapped well up the calves, 
and holding a scepter in his right hand. 

KING'S GUARDS— Dressed as sol- 
diers, with helmets, shields, coats of mail 
reaching to their knees, spears, hose and 
sandals. 

ELEAZER^ — In the garb of a priest, 
with long, flowing, white gown, white 
turban with caps to cover hair, long 
flowing grey beard and staff. 

LIEUT. COMMANDER— As Judas 
Maccabeus, dressed as a Jewish peasant 
with black and white turban, tunic, hose 
and sandals. 

CANDIDATE — As peasant, wearing 
tunic, long hose, sandals and turban. 

PROPERTIES— Sword, spears, staff, 
banners, two leather scourges and small 
urn with red fire to burn in forming 
tableaux at the death of Eleazer. All 
other officers and actors should wear 
long, flesh colored hose, over drawers 
or trousers, reaching, to the thigh, with 
'sahdals or slij)pers. If a Tent does not 
feel able to purchase new costumes, and 
have such as were formerly used in the 
old Ritual, they can get along with such 



September, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



159 



as they have, but 's'hould get turbans, 
wigs and beards as required, and also 
five uniforms for soldiers to make up 
the characters. 

JUDAS — 'Mr. , you (have made 

application for membership in this Tent 
of the Knigthts of the Maccabees. You 
have been well recommended and elecf- 
e'd to membership. I can assure you 
there is nothing in the ceremonies of the 
Order that will conflict with your re- 
ligions or political opinions. Are you 
willing to proceed? 

CHAPLAIN — You will now repeat 
after me: "I voluntarily promise in the 
presence of these Sir Kniglits, that I 
will conform to, be bound by, and up- 
hold all the laws of the Order now in 
force or that may hereafter be adopted 
by the governing body; that I will not 
make known to anyone, not a member 
of this Order, any of the signs, words, 
passwords, or private work, or any busi- 
ness that may occur in any Tent; that 
I will not communicate the same to any 
expelled or suspended member. That 
I will not impart the same even to a 
Sir Knight who may be entitled to them, 
unless under cover of a Tent, for the 
purpose of instruction, or where testing 
him, and then with all due caution ; that 
I will submit all grievances growing out 
of my membership to the tribunals of 
the Order iov settlement ; that I will not 
publish, cause to be published, or dis- 
seminate in any manner, anything that 
will reflect on the private 'character of 
a Sir Knight; that I will not affiliate 
with any body of men claiming to be 
Knights of the Maccabees unless I 
know they are in good standing and 
working under a legal charter, or by 
authority ; that I will not take part in 
any unlawful meeting with tihe members 
of this Order ; that I will not knowingly 
wrong or defraud a Tent, a member, or 
his family, or permit it to be done, if 
I can prevent it ; that I will never fail 
the Order, house, or friend, or those of 
my own flesh and blood, in time of dan- 
ger, need, or sorrow ; that I will aid, 
defend, and protect a brother Maccabee, 
•his family, and his orphans to the full- 
est extent of my ability, and will enter 
info their sorrows so far as to restore 
peace to a mind in trouh-le. I especially 



promise, that I will be as true and loyal 
to my country and its laws as was Judas 
Maccabeus to his country and its laws, 
and that I will be temperate in my habits 
and uprig^ht in my conduct, so as to 
command tlhe respect of all. To this I 
pledge my honor as a man, and promise 
to remain steadfast in the same until 
death. 

The emblem of our Order is the Cir- 
cle and the Globe. The Circle, on which 
you gave us your pledge of iionor ; the 
Globe, over the entire face of which that 
pledge shall be held sacred. Always 
bear in mind that a circle has no end- 
ing. So should it be with the fraternal 
pledge you have made here to-night. See 
that it remains unbroken, continues w^ith- 
out end, and that wherever on the face 
of the globe you meet one who has taken 
and kept inviolate that pledge you greet 
and treat him as a brother. 

PAST COMMANDER— My kins- 
man, you are about to have conferred 
upon you the title of a Knight of the 
Maccabees, but before this is done, T 
desire to call your attention to the ob- 
jects of our Order and to some of the 
requirements of a membership among 
us. Its great object is to unite frater- 
nally all those who are physically and 
morally qualified under its laws, in or- 
der to better aid those Who may become 
disabled, or who >may reach the allotted 
age of man, and to provide for the 
widows, orphans, and dependents of its 
members. This Order is a great co- 
partnership ; all are ahke interested in 
its welfare; all are equal under its laws. 
It is not a cold business corporation, or- 
ganized for profit and gain. Its founda- 
tion is fraternity ; its superstructure pro- 
tection ; and in order to promote its 
'healthy growth and enlarge its useful- 
ness, we must all work zealously hand 
in hand. The 'ceremony through which 
you have just passed was not an imag- 
inary creation, in whidh an attempt was 
made to entertain or surprise you. The 
tragedies you have seen enacted and the 
warfare in which you are supposed to 
have taken a part are facts, and to be 
found in both sacred and profane his- 
tory. While groping your way cautious- 
ly along a solitary and unfamiliar path- 
way, you were set upon in a rude man- 



160 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1909. 



your own fles'h and blood, and that you 
will comfort with your sympathy, and 
assist with your substance the broken-- 
hearted and the destitute. Should you 
ever knowingly and willingly violate 
this solemn pledge, you need no longer 
expect o'ur confidence and felloWiShip. 
When you think of the solemnity ;and 
magnitude of your engagements here to- 
night, need I say that you cannot retire 
from this room exactly the same kind 
of m'an (or men) you were when you 
entered? No! After seeing and hear- 
ing what you have seen and heard, and 
making such promises las you have 
made, you will surely go hence a better 
man (or better men) filled with a 'high- 
er ambition, and inspired wit'h a nobler 
purpose in life. Time will not permit 
ane to indicate all of the valuable les- 
sons exemplified in this degree, but, to 
the thoughtful mind, they are sufficient- 
ly obvious. If we have succeeded in 
awakening in your breast a determina- 
tion to be at all times truly fraternal in 
your dealings with the widow, the fath- 
erless, the unfortunate, and the stranger 
within thy gates, we ihave not labored 
in vain. 

In conclusion let me Temind you that 
in becoming a member of this great fra- 
ternal brotherhood, you ihave changed 
your relations with a vast number of 
persons. While you remain true to your 
pledge, rest assured that in the Macca- 
bees you will find friends who will com- 
fort you in your prosperity. When the 
battle of life is ended and you are about 
to 'Commence your journey to the realms 
beyond the grave, you will have the con- 
solation of knowing, that, among us, you 
ihave brethren wnho will give your re- 
mains a fraternal burial, keep green your 
memory, defend your character and pro- 
vide for those who are nearest and dear- 
est to you. 



How wonderful the grace of God! 
When men draw near to Him an inch He 
draws near to them an ell. 



When a man says, "Everything is 
against me," you may be sure he belongs 
to one of three classes : the ignorant, tbe 
indolent or the self-willed. 



ner, carried captive before an arbitrary 
despot, and subjected to a most harrow- 
ing experience. Tihis was to test your 
loyalty to friends, as well as your re- 
gard for the assurances you made to 
Mattathias. How well you bore the or- 
deal and justified those assurances let 
your own thoughts now answer, and let 
that answer be a warning for 'the future 
and a solemn reminder of your fraternal 
covenant with us. While in this dilemma 
your Maccabee friend, after freeing him- 
self froim the chains of his oppressors 
came to your relief, and rescued you 
from your perilous situation. Later, to 
more fully exemplify the beautiful les- 
son of friendship, ihe bestowed upon you 
the favors which his valor had won for 
himself. L^arn from this and forget 
ndt that *'A friend in need is a friend 
indeed." The lessons we would have 
you learn in your experience with us 
this evening have an important applica- 
tion to your personal relationship to the 
government that protects you, as well 
as your social relations with your fellow- 
men, and your duty to Order, home 
and friends. As Maccabees we strive to 
impress all members with a firm and 
determined resolution to always labor in 
the cause of justice, mercy, and char- 
ity; remembering that justice begets jus- 
tice, imercy begets mercy, and charity 
begets charity. All these virtues were 
exemplified in the life and character of 
Judas Maocabeus, the liberator of liis 
people; one of the first of a glorious 
army of martyrs wiho have suffered in 
the cause of human freedom. His whole 
life was characterized by an undying de- 
votion to country, home and friends. He 
it was who demanded of his soldiers 
that, in dividing the fruits of their vic- 
tories, they should reserve a part for 
the widows, orpihans and disabled; a 
practice observed (in effect) among all 
true Maccabees unto this day. May his 
name be honored as long as patriotism, 
love and friendship *have a place in the 
hearts of men, and may you ever emu- 
late his virtues, and prove yourself 
worthy of the new character you have 
assumed to-night. You have given us 
your pledge of honor as a man (or men) 
that you will always be true to country, 
order, home and friends, and those of 



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CONTENTS. 



Dwight L. Moody— Remarks at "Reunion 
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Ministers and Lodges at Funerals. ..... .166 

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"Jesus answered him, — I spake openlj to iHe world; and in secret have I said nothing," John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLII. 



CHICAGO, OCTOBER 1909. 



NUMBER 6 



The Michigan State convention will 
be held on Oct. 6 and 7, in Alma on the 
Pere Marquette and Toledo & Ann Ar- 
bor railroads. 



The New York-New Jersey State con- 
vention will begin Oct. 26 in Rev. Dr. F. 
M. Foster's church, New York City. 



— A religious paper published in the 
Athens of America, said in a recent 
article on Paul's farewell : ''When Paul 
went up to Jerusalem he was not enter- 
tained as the guest of Peter or Paul, but 
a certain Mason was made his host."' 
Paul did not entertain Paul — that we 
concede; but was Mason -of Cyprus a 
Mason? How much comfort this mis- 
print may have distributed, and how 
many Masons may have exulted in new 
■proof that their ordcfr is founded on the 
]>ible, we do not know. 



— ^Odd Fellowship began its American 
career ninety years ago last spring, hav- 
ing been started in this country by Wil- 
dev, Welch, Duncan, Rushworth and 
Cheatham, April 26, 1819. Whether 
everyone of these men would have en- 
dorsed willingly all that now belongs to 
Odd Fellowship it might be charitable 
toward those long dead to doubt. Yet 
we fear that a century after the first 
Masonic grand lodge was formed the 
kindred order was fairly well versed in 
the Theistic requirements of lodge re- 
ligion. 



KEEP HIM OUT OF MASONRY. 

Keep the evil-minded man out of Ma- 
sonry if you expect to keep the frater- 
nity a healthful working force for good. 
A tree of hfe does not develop from the 
root of evil planted in an atmosphere of 
purity. "Keep the cynic far from the 
ancient fraternity where harmony is ob- 



structed by the superstitious and mo- 
rose." How much more care then should 
be taken to keep the man of evil inten- 
tions outside of our society. It is much 
easier to keep him out in the first place 
than to get him out after he once gets 
in. — Fraternal Record. 

And surely the opposite sort of man 
should keep himself out of Masonry. 



The Bee Hive says : It is very much 
to be regretted that there seems to be a 
growing disposition on the part of fra- 
ternal beneficiary societies towards pure 
commercialism and away from fraternal- 
ism ; in other words, away from the 
forms and ceremonies which are the very 
essence of ritualism. 

The Knights of the Globe remarks 
that "the fraternal certificate is not a 
substitute for charity. It afifords a ben- 
efit which the beneficiaries of a member 
are entitled to receive both in justice and 
equity." 

Yet will not members of the order talk 
about its charity ; is not this very para- 
graph aimed at that custom, and is not 
a good part of what lodge advocates 
mean by charity of just the nature which 
this editor honestly describes? 



AK SAR BEN. 

In order to recognize the dignity of 
the office of President of the United 
States of x\merica, the Knights of Ak 
.Sar Ben, formed from all classes of 
business men to entertain visitors com- 
ing to Omaha, Nebraska, planned to en- 
tertain President Taft the last day in 
September. The committee announced 
the charge of $20 a plate for the dinner, 
added the order that eacli payment must 
be sent in with liie distinct understand- 
ing that the a[:.i)licant would appear at 
dinner in a spike-tailed coat, white 



162 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



waist-coat, light trousers, white spats 
and black shoes. None of the 1,500 
members of the order are said to have 
objected to the price in money, but many 
were dissatisfied with the terms, so far 
as they applied to the whole uniform to 
be worn. A large nuiuber of business 
3iien decided not to attend the banquet 
for this reason. 



''John!" she exclaimed, jabbing her 
•elbow into his ribs at 2:17 a. m., ''did 
jou lock the kitchen door?" And John, 
who is inner guard, and was just then 
<lreaming over last evening's lodge meet- 
ing, sprang up in bed, made the proper 
sign, and responded: "Worthy Ruler, 
our portals are guarded." Oh, he hit the 
title right, even if he was asleep. 



A fraternal insurance organ remarks : 
^'The latest idea of social reformers is 
that hopeless tramps and loafers are in- 
sane, because they will not work. First 
thing you know, somebody will be ques- 
tioning the mental condition of certaii^ 
fraternities that expect to run forever, 
on inadequate rates and growing defi- 
ciencies. They won't work, either." 

The same paper speaks of a Western 
fraternity w^hose members "expect to get 
life insurance at the rate of four dollars 
a year for each thousand dollars of in- 
surance; such a rate to remain un- 
■changed during their natural lives." 
Elsewhere, the paper says: "When the 
fraternalist first unites with the young 
•order, no praise is too great, the cost is 
so little, the protection so ample. But 
when the passing years bring readjust- 
ment to adequacy for future safety, his 
tone changes." Is there not plenty of 
reason for such a change? The solicitor 
did not think to mention that it is one 
thing to join a new society with its light 
mortuary drain, and another thing to re- 
main while the society grows older, age 
begins to steal upon the membership, 
and there comes on the more rapid pay- 
ment of death claims. When will men 
learn that there is nothing in ceremonies 
of initiation to cheat death, secure per- 
petual youth to the whole membership, 
•or annihilate financial and arithmetical 
-conditions as unchanging as the hills, as 



certain as sunrise, and as inevitable as 
the returning seasons? 

We add to these quotations from this 
fraternal insurance organ, one more se- 
lection, worth noticing as a fraternal- 
ist's opinion of a phase of f raternalism : 

"What is the position of those, who, 
charged with responsibility, wilfully 
shut their eyes to the vision; whose idea 
of duty is to trade on the ignorance of 
men, and tempt vast memberships by the 
lure of utterly insuf^cient payments ; 
whose applicants are led on to believe 
that current cost at entry can be main- 
tained by growth as a whole life, un- 
changing rate? A tested and proved im- 
possibility. 

"There are societies whose future de- 
ficiencies, already overwhelming, are pil- 
ing up sky high with appalling rapidity, 
as unthinking new members pour in, 
while the management are joyous in con- 
gratulation. They are like a child adrift, 
above Niagara, pleased with the rapid 
motion that draws the boat faster and 
faster to destruction." 



HOW THEY LEAD. 

Here is a clippiftg of the Syracuse 
Lodge of Pythias as handed to me at 
their annual banquet: 

Mr. Ira Hoshan responded' to "The Rela- 
tion of Lodge to the Church." He compares 
the lodge as an auxiliary to the church as 
the Sunday school is to the church. The 
child when young is brought up in the Sun- 
day school and is taught the lessons of 
Christianity, but in after years as they grow 
up into imanhood and womanhood they drift 
from their early associations, and it Is here 
that the lodge steps in and through its influ- 
ence turns their footsteps in the right direc- 
tion, teaching them the bond of 'fellowship 
and right living. 

"After the program was finished the mem- 
bers and their families enjoyed a social 
dance." 

This is leading young people in the 
right direction, isn't it? God have 
mercy on such deluded individuals. 

— Rev. C. Weimer in Christian Con- 
servator. 



The outer life of a church member is 
ordinarily a fair test of the inner life. 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



DWIGHT L. MOODY. 



Remarks at Re=union Week Meeting in 
Chicago Avenue Church. 

By President Blanchard, of Wheat- 
ON College. 
I first met Mr. Moody in i860 at a 
Sabbath s'c'hool meeting in the Method- 
ist Church at Wheaton. I was then a 

boy of twelve years 
and was impressed 
as all persons were 
by the earnestness 
and power of that 
great man. When 
I was twenty, my 
own pubhc service 
began and very 
soon I came in 
touch with the 
work which was 
beginning in the 
is now the Chicago 
It has been my priv- 




D. L. MOOD^. 

movement which 
Avenue Church. 



ilege to know, in a way, every pastor 
of the church except Mr. Harwood. I 
do not remember having seen him until 
this week. I believe I have had the 
pleasure of knowing every choir leader, 
every Sunday school superintendent 
and almost every leading worker in the 
church from its organization until now. 
Though I had not the pleasure of know- 
ing Mr. Harwood, my honored father 
was Moderator of _ the Council and 
preached the sermon when he was or- 
dained at Crystal Lake about forty years 
ago. 

11. 
I wish to mention one characteristic 
of Mr. Moody which is not often spok- 
en of so far as I have observed. My 
impression is that we think of him usu- 
ally as a masterful man, as a great 
preacher of the Gospel, and as a lover 
of his home. Any one of these traits 
would have suffered to make him fa- 
mous and he possessed them all in 



an eminent degree. But the one which 
I have in mind was the foundation on 
which the others stood and was, as it 
has seemed to me, the real secret of his 
greatness. I am thinking of his fidelity 
to the truth. Mr. Moody was a wise 
man in the worldly as well as in the 
•divine sense of the word. He felt in- 
stantly the probable effect of an action 
and he dreaded ,as quickly as a politi- 
cian the result of an unpopular act, and 
yet I never knew him to refuse to take 
his stand for a truth which was clearly 
presented to him. I will mention four 
instances which broug^ht this character- 
istic clearly to view. 

First, Mr. Moody was a most power- 
ful preacher of the law. All evangelists 
whose work abides must be of this type. 
President Finney was. ]\Iere sentimen- 
talism has never worked solid changes 
in individuals or society. I mention a 
single sermon of Mr. ^Moody's which 
shows this side of his preaching; many 
others might be named.' I have in mind^ 
however, his sermon on Sowing and 
Reaping. Every man who heard that 
sermon was deeply impressed with the 
fa'ct that this is a 'universe of law, and 
that persons who trifle with law are cer- 
tain to be destroyed by it. This gave 
a solid foundation of the Gospel procla- 
mation which, beyond doubt, was the 
great delight of this great evangelist. 

A second proof of Mr. ^loody's fidel- 
ity to his convictions was found in his 
testimony against secret societies. In 
Chicago, in Brooklyn, in Xew York, in 
Philadelphia, at Northfield, he bore un- 
flinchingly a powerful testimon}- against 
these idolatries, ''the high places of our 
time." At the date when 'Sir. ]\Ioody 
bore this testimony lodgism was far 
more popular than it is at present, and 
at present it is far more popular than it 
will be shortly. I myself heard Mr. 
Aloody say that he had been told that if 



164 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



he admitted the lodge question to the 
Northfield platform he could not get 
money for schools. But he said, "If 
we cannot get money for our schools and 
'be faithful ito God, we will let the schools 
go; God can get on without the schools, 
but He requires us to be faithful." 

The third question of the sort I have 
in mind was his testimony for political 
separation from godless men and organi- 
zations. One of his first friends, a man 
who died and left a fortune of over three 
millions of dollars in this city, .and who 
had for years been a lover and fellow 
helper of Mr. Moody's, broke with him 
on this point. 

The fourth proof of this characteristic 
which I have in mind was afforded by 
Mr. Moody's habits regarding Sunday 
travel. When he was walking through 
the rain and slush in St. Louis on the 
Lord's Day, a friend said to him: ''Mr. 
Moody, you are acting like a fool; the 
street cars are running right along side 
of you, you don't stop them by walking 
through this mud. Why not get up and 
ride?" He replied: "I have definitely 
made up my mind that no street car man 
at the Judgment Day shall point his 
finger at me and say, 'Lord I did not 
have time to be a Christian, I had to 
haul that preacher around on Sunday.' " 
One of Mr. Moody's lovers and helpers 
said to me: "He walked me nearly to 
death one night between the First Con- 
gregational Church and the Great Pa- 
cific Hotel. I said to him, 'What is the 
use of our walking through this slush 
and storm, we are accomplishing noth- 
ing ?' and he simply said, 'I do not ride 
on Sunday.' " 

HI. 

I wish, with gratitude to God, to speak 
of three things which I think He per- 
mitted me to do for this dear ehurch dur- 
ing the year and a half in which I was 
its preacher. 



First, the old motto, "Welcome to 
this House of God are strangers and the 
poor," which stood in large letters at the 
entrance to the old Illinois Street Tab- 
ernacle, had in some way dropped out. 
The spirit of the motto was alive and 
flourishing in the church, but in moving 
to the one Jbuilding from the other, the 
words had not been transferred. As 
soon as attention was called to this*omis- 
sion, the words were reinstated. They 
were placed where they are to-day and 
constitute the most valid proof of the 
apostolic succession of the Church, 

Second, I think as I review the serv- 
ices of that period, imperfect, as I see 
them to have been, I was, nevertheless, 
enabled to unite and harmonize the 
church on the preaching of the Word 
This 'churoh had always believed in 
preaching the Gospel. There were mem- 
bers of it who thought that this was all 
that was required. There were others 
who felt that the whole Word of God 
■was needful to symmetrical Christian 
life and effective Church life. I think 
when in the providence of God my work 
here closed, there was, more largely than 
before, a feeling that the whole Word of 
God was essential to the whole life and 
work of the Church. 

But the largest service, which, as it 
seems to me, God put within my 
power at that time, was the begin- 
ning of the Bible Institute. It had 
been in- the mind of Mr. Moody for 
years. Miss Dryer had been brought to 
Chicago from our State Normal at 
Bloomington for the express purpose of 
inaugurating it. She with her helpers 
had been working toward and praying 
for it. At the first opening of classes in 
the Young Men's Christian Association 
building. Doctor Moorhead was faced by 
an eager company of young men and 
women who wished to fit themselves for 



October, 1909.. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



165 



Christian work. The second opening the 
next winter, witnessed an increase in the 
numbers and, if possible, in the en- 
thusiasm of teachers and pupils. Then 
Mr. Moody came and meetings were 
held in the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation building to confer regarding the 
launching of a permanent school. Mr. 
Knsign, who was one of the most gifted 
_ tnea our city has ever known in power 
^ to interest wealthy men in Christian 
work, undertook the raising of the two 
himdred and fifty thousand dollars 
which was essential for the beginning. 
The rest of the story, at least in part, 
you know. It fell to me, in the good 

■ providence of God, to secure the five 
F hundred dollars which, placed in the 

hands of Miss Dryer, inaugurated this 
vast and beneficent work. For this I 
P praise His name and shall always praise 
Him. 

IV. 

I wish to speak gratefully for a mo- 
ment of certain things which God did for 
me through this church and its great 
founder. 

And first I am thankful to acknowl- 
•edge that I received here a new insight 
into the Word of G6d. I still find' myself 
so ignorant that I seem at times to know 

■ nothing, yet I know so much that I do 
" not know how to be sufficiently grateful, 

and for a large share of my grip on this 
word I feel indebeted to Mr. Moody 
and the Chicago Avenue Church. 

Second, I received here a new insight 

I and impulse, a new insight into and im- 
pulse toward the work of God. In those 
days there were six adult Bible classes : 
Miss Dryer's, Mr. Cragin's, Mr. Revell's, 
Mr. Weeks' and two others. These Bible 
classes were practically churches. The 
membership and attendance varied from 
seventy-five to two hundred.x Each Sal>- 
bath day in each class there was held an 



after-meeting and streams of converts 
were pouring from those classes into the 
church continually. There was also the 
Mission Band and the Yoke-Fellows 
Band, devoted young fellows went 
up and dov/n the streets of the city com- 
pelling men to come in. It was a won- 
derful drill. I had heard Mr. Moody 
speak of it repeatedly, but I never saw it 
in action until I was privileged to wo^-k 
here in Chicago Avenue. The adult 
classes were also marvelous to see an.! 
feel. So soon as the Sabbath school 
closed, every one of those great classes 
vvas on its krees. 

My short stay in rjjhis church also led 
me into the light as regards the coming 
of our Lord. While I was preachmg 
here, Mr. bloody one day said to rne in 
Farvvell ITaH : • ''What do you think 
aibout the second coming of our Lord?" 
I replied : 'T do not think about it. I 
hope to be ready when He comes, earlv 
or late." The statement was true at 
that time, though I am quite ashamed of 
it. Not long after that Miss Dryer ask- 
ed me to turn over the Word of God 
with her on that subject, and put in my 
hand one or two bits of writing that 
were helpful. The result was that the 
whole Word of God seemed to 'become 
luminous with the approaching day. I 
do not think there is one truth of the 
Holy Scripture which is so vital to me 
to-day as that — I mean one to which I 
return in my thinking so often and which 
is so great an inspiration and comfort. 
If I had never received anything else 
from Chicago Avenue Church but light 
upon that one subject, I should have oc- 
casion for never-ceasing gratitude. 

Last among these acknowledgments 
of blessing received through this church, 
I desire to speak of the men whom I 
met and learned to honor and love 
while I was here. Dear ^Lajor Whittle, 



166 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



great-souled, tender-hearted, faithful and 
true; Brother Morton, who came to me 
after ;the first sermon which I preached 
from this platform with a word of broth- 
erly cheer; Major Cole, who said tO' me 
in the Northwestern Station one day a 
helpful word which has lasted out all the 
years since it was spoken. Dear Brother 
Revell, who twenty-five years ago gave 
me the keys to the huilding and study, 
and when I returned them to him, said : 
"I hate to take these keys from you." 
I said : "Truly I hate to give them to 
you." Dear Mr. and Mrs. Savage al- 
ways in their places, always cheery with 
the light from the other side shining 
upon their faces. Precious Brother An- 
drew. You may not all recognize him 
by that name, but I know him best by 
it. He was like the Andrew of old, a 
good man full of faith and of the Holy 
Ghost. But it is hard to stop and hard 
to go on. Mr. and Mrs. John Morrison, 
Mr. and Mrs. Hitchcock, Robert Cedar, 
faithful Brother Aitchison,. and all oth- 
ers who were kind to me in those days, 
were patient with my ignorance and im- 
perfections, God has 'blessed and will 
bless them every one. It is not strange 
that I should have forgotten till now to 
name Brother Herald, who sat by my 
side a year and a half, who selected the 
hymns with marvelous spiritual discern- 
ment and who lived to sing and to speak 
the Gospel which he lived. If I should 
live a thousand years, I could never for- 
get nor cease to be grateful for the priv- 
ilege of knowing and laboring with these 
dear people. May God bless them every 
one. 

I do not speak of the precious friends 
who are here to-day because this is a 
meeting for memories, 'but I may take an 
instant to say that it is glorious to see 
the altar fires still blazing and to know 
that the good work of all the past is to 
be dwarfed in the glory of the years to 
come. 



MINISTERS AND LODGES AT 
FUNERALS. 

After all that has been said .and writ- 
ten on the question of the Church's rela- 
tion to the lodge, there is still a lack of 
unanimity among pastors on the subject. 
It is, perhaps, not so surprising that there 
should be a disagreement as to the treat- 
ment of the individual lodge member, 
but it does seem strange that there 
should be so great a lack of unanimity on 
the treatment of the lodge as such. 

'It is in connection with the burial of 
people who have been members of the 
lodge that the pastor comes into contact 
with the lodge as such. He is often ask- 
ed ^ to officiate at funerals at -which the 
lodge as such is to take part of the 
service into its hands, through the per- 
formance of ceremonies peculiar to the 
lodge and executed hy a deputation of 
the lodge or by its chaplain. The con- 
scientious minister takes the stand that 
he cannot officiate in company with the 
representatives of any society which does 
not, in so far as it is a religious society 
at all, confess exactly the same faith as 
does the church of which he is a min- 
ister. 

There can be no doubt that the lodge 
is to a certain extent a religious society. 
It not only has it chaplain, but it has its 
prescribed forms of prayer and services, j 
its regular form, with prayer and sacred J 
song, for initiations,, burials, and celebra- 1 
tions. To be sure, the average secret so- 
ciety has not been founded with the idea 
that it is to supplant the Church; most 
societies are founded for business and 
social interests and for insurance pur- 
poses. But that does not dispose of the 
fact that these societies, for whatever 
reason they may have been founded, 
have assumed the right ,to make them- 
selves to a considerable extent the con- 
fessors of a certain religion. 

When the pastor is asked to officiate 
with the lodge, his decision on his ac- 
tion must be along the same lines as 
though he had been asked to officiate 
with the minister of .another church. 
And, since the lodge openly confesses 
that its religion dares not be Christian, 
but that it can require of its members 
only the general faith in one supreme 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



167 



Being, it follows that the pastor's stand 
must be the same as though he had been 
asked to officiate in connection with a 
minister of the Unitarian Church. 

What would any Lutheran, really 
Lutheran, pastor say if he were asked 
to conduct a funeral in company with 
a minister of a Unitarian Church? He 
would, without a moment's doubt or hes- 
itation, decline to serve. And that is 
all he can do when asked to officiate with 
the chaplain of a lodge which officially 
makes a religious confession, and whose 
confession is not outspokenly that of 
true faith in Jesus Christ as the only 
Savior of the world. 

Attempts at Compromise. 

Because so few people nowadays 
closely discriminate in matters of re- 
ligion, the refusal of a pastor to officiate 
at a funeral at which a lodge is also to 
officiate causes much unpleasantness, and 
in many cases a bitter ill-feeling towards 
the pastor. Contrary to some people's 
ideas on the su'bject, the pastor does 
not like to incur people's ill will. It is 
a very painful experience to 'him to bring 
upon himself all manner of obloquy be- 
cause he feels in conscience bound to de- 
cline to officiate with the lodge. 

For this reason, both on the side of 
the pastor and on the side of the peo- 
ple, various attempts at compromise 
have been made. The pastor tries to 
plan some way, following which he may 
be able to satisfy his own conscience 
and at the same time the demands of 
his people. If people only know how 
heavy at heart the pastor is when he is 
imable to serve them as they would like 
to be served, and how many hours of 
deep study hundreds of pastors have 
spent in trying to unravel the hard knots 
in this lodge problem, they would, if 
they possessed a grain of sympathetic 
feeling, commiserate their pastors in- 
stead of heaping abuse upon them, as is 
so often done. 

What of the compromises which have 
been suggested? The pastor is often 
asked whether he cannot finish his serv- 
ice and then permit the lodge to have 
its burial ritual after he has finished. 
He is even told that his presence at the 
cemetery is not necessary, that he may 



go home from the house of mourning or 
from the church so soon as he has ended 
the service there, allowing the lodge to 
attend the body of the dead to the cem- 
etery and there to perform its rites. 

In many cases where people suggest 
this compromise they think they have 
effectually solved the whole question ; 
and when the minister tells them that he 
cannot consent even to this arrangement, 
they become completely convinced that 
he has no feeling whatever for their 
wishes, and that he is from sheer stub- 
bornness opposing his will to theirs. 

The Real Situation. 

Dare a conscientious pastor officiate 
at a funeral, knowing that after he has 
finished the service some lodge will have 
a religious service over the body of the 
dead? Dare he close his service at the 
house of mourning or at the church, and 
permit the lodge to attend to the serv- 
ice at the grave? Or dare he, as is 
sometimes recommended, agree to the 
plan of having the lodge finish its short 
service at the house before 'he begins 
the church's service. 

Our answer to all these questions is 
a decided "No." And it seems to us 
that there should be no difficulty in rec- 
ognizing our reasons. Passing over the 
often repeated argument that the whole 
proceeding is unionistic, that, even when 
the pastor has ''gone through the mo- 
tions" of closing his service, his closing 
is simply a pretense when he knows 
that others are to take up what he has 
"closed" and "really-truly" close it, 
there is another feature of the case which 
disposes of the entire question with a 
finality which should appeal to every 
conscientious Christian. 

We have never yet seen a lodge burial 
prayer which expressed the hope of sal- 
vation through Jesus Christ, our Sa- 
vior. Nor have we ever heard a lodge 
burial prayer which did not express the 
hope of a blessed hereafter. Now, what 
do lodge prayers say of entering into the 
blessedness of eternity? Is it not true 
that the prayers in question invariably 
express the conviction that the departed 
''brother" is at peace and rest, in bless- 
edness and joy. because he was a good 
member of the lodge, because he was 






168 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



OctoDer, 1909. 



morally fit, not because he was a 'believer 
in Jesus? The burial prayers of secret 
societies are not secret. Any one may 
hear them. Analyze them, and judge 
whether they do not express a hope of 
salvation without Christ ; which means, 
for some other reason than that Christ 
is the Savior of souls. 

Guilty of Treachery. 

The whole question then narrows 
down to this : Dare a minister, who has 
consecrated his whole life and strength 
to the preaching of one truth, the truth 
that Jesus alone is the Savior of souls, 
dare he enter into an agreement in which 
he says, ''After I have preached you the 
way of salvation through faith in Jesus 
Christ and in Him alone, I am perfectly, 
willing that others shall, in connection 
with the same hurial, follow my service 
with the teaching that what I have told 
you is not the truth, that souls can be 
saved without faith in Jesus Christ?" 

How any minister can consent to an 
arrangement which implies what we 
have just stated is beyond our compre- 
hension, and we do not believe it is so 
very difficult to make people see the 
reasonableness of our position, once we 
apply this mode of showing them the 
treachery of which we would be guilty 
if we listened to their requests. The 
time should be very near at hand when 
every Lutheran minister would advance 
at least to this position, 'T cannot offi- 
ciate at any funeral at which any society 
conducts any religious service which is 
not purely Lutheran." 

As for ministers of other denomina- 
tions, this argument will not be so 
strong, seeing that it is considered a min- 
or offense for their pastors to 
preach Christ as being not divine. 
Churches which complacently tolerate 
virtual Unitarianism in their pulpits and 
in their college chairs cannot be expect- 
ed to draw the line at Unitarianism in 
connection with an ordinary funeral serv- 
ice. — Lutheran Standard. 



Men who regard their manners as 
they do their honor will be respected 
wherever they go. 



W. C. T. U. ADDRESS. 
The Evils of Organized Secrecy 

By Miss S. F. Hinman, Oberlin, O. 

Frances Willard characterized the 
policy of this organization, of which she 
was for so many years the soul, as the 
"Do-everything" policy. The object of 
the W. C. T. U. is to attack not merely 
intemperance, but every form of iniq- 
uity, and to apply every remedy, the 
use of which is sanctioned by reason^ 
conscience and experience. To he an 
embodied public conscience, to lead pub- 
lic sentiment- on all moral questions, to 
''point to brighter worlds and gently lead 
the way," is, in my judgment, the high- 
est mission of the VV. C. T. U. 

With this belief, I need not apologize 
for introducing as my topic, "The Evils 
of Organized Secrecy." By organized 
secrecy, I mean the system of secret or- 
ders, with their vast and growing power 
in this and other lands. So insidious is 
this evil, and so many men and women 
of undoubted Christian character have 
been ensnared in its toils, that many 
of those present may hear with aston- 
ishment that any are so bold as to call 
it an evil. I htg all such to listen — as 
I shall try to speak — without prejudice. 

Indictments against organized secrecy 
might 'be entered on many counts. Its 
puerile mummery, false pretensions, and 
boastful swagger might suffice to 
condemn it in the eyes of the thought- 
ful, but my present purpose is to pre- 
sent still more serious charges. I in- 
dict lodgery in the name of the home, 
of the state and of the Church. The 
W. C. T. U. is the champion of the 
home. It assails the liquor traffic as 
the foremost enemy of the home. For 
a like reason, it might assail the lodge. 
Every wife, mother and sister is justi- 
fied in viewing with suspicion an organ- 
ization to which she is denied admission^ 
and concerning whose proceedings she 
is forbidden to inquire. The same may 
be said of 'husband, father and brother. 
Let me quote briefly Dr. A. C. Dixon, 
pastor of the Moody Church, Chicago : 

" 'Husbands, dwell with your wives'" 
and well with your wives, 'according to 
knowledge.' Some one says, 'What does 
this mean ?' Well, I do not know defin- 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



169 



itely, but it can mean that you oug-ht to 
share each other's knowledge. 'Dwell 
with your wives according- to knowl- 
edge/ and your husbands ought not to 
have any secrets that your wives ought 
not to know, and the wives 'had better 
not have any secrets that the husbands 
ought not to know ; certainly no secrets 
that the wife shall not know\ and the 
husband sJiall not know\ The husband 
may keep from the wife many things 
that would unduly distress her, and the 
wife may keep from the husband some 
things that would unduly distress him. 

When you are asked to join a society 
into wdiich your wife cannot go with 
you, if you have a wise head you will 
'shake' it, and when you find yourself 
in a society the secrets of which your 
wife cannot share, you had better give 
up vour societv, and the quicker the bet- 
ter.'' 

Secrecy itself, in a free land and in a 
time of profound peace, is a just sub- 
ject of suspicion. Our Savior said : 
''And this is the judgment, that the light 
is come into the world, and men loved 
the darkness rather than the light ;' for 
their works were evil. For every one 
that doeth evil hateth the light, and com- 
eth not to the light, lest his works should 
be reproved. But 'he that doeth the 
truth cometh to the light, that his works 
may be made manifest, that they have 
been wrought in God" (Jno. 3:19-21). 
Mothers, let me ask you, if your chil- 
dren should systematically conceal their 
doings from you, what would you be 
constrained to believe? Now I do not 
say that all the conduct of all secret 
societies is unworthy, but I do say that 
it is open to suspicion. 

That such suspicion is not wholly 
groundless is proven 'by the not infre- 
quent examples of men who have been 
tempted to drink and to impurity 
through lodge fellow\ships, where Chris- 
tians, in defiance of the Divine com- 
mand, are "unequally yoked together 
with unbelievers." Christian travelers 
in heathen lands are often shocked to 
sec how their fellow-countrymen dwell- 
ing in such lands can fall through lack 
of the restraint of an enlightened and 
Christianized public opinion. In like 
manner, the lodge room, hedged about 



with vows of concealment, removes for 
a time the restraints of ordinary society, 
and often do vile stories and strong 
drink circulate freely there when the for- 
mal exercises are concluded. Sometimes 
these dissipations are followed by orgies 
more loathesome, in haunts I will not 
name (Mod. Sec. Soc, p. no). 

Observe that I do not say that this 
is the invariable result to men of lodge 
membership, ibut it is a not infrequent 
nor unnatural outcome of conditions 
which remove ordinary moral restraints. 
As bearing on this point and at the 
same time opening the way for the 
next, let me mention that when Canon 
City, Col., went dry last year, two 
clubs in the city, backed by state char- 
ters, defied the local option law. Noth- 
ing could be done against them till steps 
were taken to revoke their charters. 
One of these was a secret order, "The 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks." 

This leads me to frame a second in- 
dictment against the lodge, in the name 
of the state. Most secret societies re- 
quire of the initiate an oath of obliga- 
tion. Without dwelling just now^ on the 
nature of such oaths, let us merelv re- 
mind ourselves that the only oath of the 
Christian can conscientiously take, is 
one administered by the government to 
which he owes allegiance. Yet historv 
has shown repeated examples of men — 
even officers of the law — wdio have not 
only taken the unlawful oaths of the 
lodge, hut even have held them as more 
binding than their oaths of office or the 
oath taken in court, and have withheld 
knowledge vital to the public welfare and 
shielded criminals. Some vears since, 
in Bath, Maine, a clergyman urged the 
prosecution of a notorious saloonkeeper. 
The attorney to whom he applied asked, 
''Are you not a Mason?" ''Yes," was 
the reply. "Well," answered the attor- 
ney, "that saloonkeper is a Alason ; you 
would better let him alone." The case 
was dropped. The clergyman may have 
soothed his conscience by declaring that 
he did not actively shield the saloon- 
keeper; but his silence had the same ef- 
fect. 

Of black crimes concealed and even 
perpetrated under the s'hield of lodge 
oaths, I will not harrow you by speak- 



170 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



ing. An essay on the history of political 
parties in the United States, written by 
a dear young friend of mine, and pub- 
lished recently in the Oberlin News, 
speaks of the Anti-Masonic party of 
eighty years ago, as growing out of the 
mysterious disappearance of William 
Morgan, ''supposed" to have been mur- 
dered by Masons, for revealing their se- 
crets. While every scheme that could 
be devised by an order fighting desper- 
ately for its life, was employed to con- 
ceal the manner of Morgan's death, yet 
there is conclusive evidence of his mur- 
der by Masons ; and a monument to his 
memory stands in Batavia, N. Y., erect- 
ed by the contributions of many hun- 
dreds of men and women, convinced by 
this evidence of the essentially unscrupu- 
lous and despotic character of Free- 
masonry. A like conviction led 45,000 
out of 50,000 Masonic contemporaries 
of Morgan to withdraw ifrom the lodge, 
while several states revoked the lodge 
charters. It is needless to say that Ma- 
sons have not repeated that gigantic mis- 
take — though they have more than once 
come very near it, as my father's asso- 
ciates in reform work can testify. 

President Finney said — and he spoke 
from personal knowledge, having joined 
the Masons in early manhood, renounc- 
ing and denouncing the order when he 
was converted : "Masonic oaths are a 
conspiracy against God and man. They 
are not repented of while they are ad- 
hered to. Refusing to renounce is ad- 
hering. Adherence makes them partaker 
of other men's sins. To laugh about the 
abduction of 'Morgan is laughing about 
murder." Daniel Wester said : 'Tn mv 
opinion the imposition of such obliga- 
tions as Freemasonry requires should be 
prohibited by law." John Quincy Ad- 
ams said that he was prepared to dem- 
onstrate ''before God and man that the 
Masonic oaths, obligations and penalties 
cannot iby any possibility be reconciled 
to the laws of morality, of Christianity, 
or of the land." Wendell Phillips said : 
"Every good citizen should make war 
on all secret societies and give himself 
no rest until they are forbidden by law 
and rooted out of existence." 

In support of J. Q. Adams' state- 
ment that "Masonic oaths, obligations 



and penalties cannot by any possibility 
be reconciled to the laws of morality,"" 
let me adduce the fact that "the Mason 
swears not to rob, strike or slander a. 
Mason ; not to commit adultery with the 
Master Mason's wife, mother, sister or 
daughter — ^the implication being that he 
is under no such o'bligation towards oth- 
ers. The Master Mason swears that he 
will keep all the secrets of a hrother 
Master Mason except murder and trea- 
son. The oath of the seventh, or Royal 
Arch degree, does not make even this- 
exception. If these oaths are mere jests, 
they are grewsome, dangerous and blas- 
phemous jests. But that they have- 
many times in the past heen taken quite 
seriously and literally, I have already in- 
dicated, and lack of time alone prevents 
my adducing many more instances. 

But secret orders are a menace to the 
state, not so much because they are some- 
times used to conceal crime and 
betray justice, as because they all exact 
a vow to conceal and to obey — the can- 
didate knows not what. An order mak- 
ing such requirements is nothing if not 
despotic. Should this despotism come in 
conflict with the legitimate authority of 
the government, anarchy and rebellion 
might 'be the result. Of this the history 
of the Mollie Maguires in Pennsylvania. 
and the Klu Klux Klan of the South, 
furnishes an example. But even if there 
be no -open conflict of authority, what 
are we to think of the spirit and influ- 
ence of an order whose boast is, "We 
know 110 government save our own"? 

I pass now to my chief argument — 
the argument which should have most 
weight with us as a Christian organiza- 
tion. I charge organized secrecy as be- 
ing not only un-Christian, but anti- 
Christian. I denounce the lodge as the 
greatest enemy of the Church of Christ. 
The Divine Founder of the Church de- 
clared : "In secret have I said nothing ;" 
and the great Apostle of the Gentiles 
commanded : "Be not unequally yoked 
with unbelievers : for what fellowship 
have righteousness and iniquity ? or what 
communion hath light with darkness? 
Wherefore come ye out fro^m among 
tlhem, and be ye separate, saith the 
Lord" (2 Cor. 6:17). 
The anti-Christian character of Free- 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



171 



masonry and Oddfellowship is obvious. 
Each professes to be a religion and to 
afford a way of salvation withotit Christ. 
Rc^bert Morris, a high Masonic author- 
ity, asserts that Masonry is a religion in 
which Christians, Jews, Mohammedans, 
Buddhists and Parsees may unite. 
Mackev, another Masonic authority, 
5ays: 'TJie creed of a Mason is brief. 
. It is a creed which demands and 
receives the universal consent of all 
men. . . . It is ibelief in God, the 
supreme Architect of heaven and earth." 
Masonry has also an altar, on which the 
Bi'ble shares a place with the square and 
compass as "furniture." In non-Chris- 
tian lands, the Koran, the Vedas, or any 
other book counted sacred, may be sub- 
stituted for the Bible. At this altar 
pravers are offered, often by godless 
men, and in those prayers, as well as in 
the passage of Scripture read, the name 
of Christ is carefully and systematically 
omitted. Notwithstanding this omission, 
Mackey says : ''A Mason . . .by 
living in strict accord with his obliga- 
tions, is freed from sin." The Cyclope- 
dia of Freemasonry says: 'When the 
Master Mason exclaims, 'My name is 
Cassia,' it is equivalent to saying, 1 
have been in the grave, I have triumph- 
ed over it 'by rising from the dead, and 
being regenerated in the process I have 
a claim to life everlasting. " And Mor- 
ris adds, "Nor is it possible to conceive 
of anything more which the soul of man 
requires." What has 'been said of Free- 
masonry is a humanly devised scheme of 
of salvation, is equally true of Oddfel- 
lowship. 

With such teaching in the lodge, it is 
not strange that Masons and Oddfel- 
lows say, "^^lasonry and Oddfellowship 
are all the religion I need." But how 
can such teaching be reconciled with the 
Word of God, which says : "For other 
foundation can no man lay than that 
which is laid, which is Jesus Christ" 
(i Cor. 3:11). "Neither is there any 
other name under heaven, that is given 
among men, wherein we must be saved " 
(Acts 4:12). Christ's own words are, 
"I am the way, and the truth, and 
the life : no one cometh unto the Father, 
but by Me" (John 14:6). 

Can we, as Christian women, defend 



a system which, though professing to 
insure eternal salvation, nevertheless de- 
nies or at best ignores Christ? Are not 
those who seek salvation through the 
lodge among the number who refuse to 
enter the sheep fold by the Door, but 
climb up some other way, of whom our 
Lord said that they are thieves and rob- 
bers ? 

But some one may say : "Surely, this 
objection does not apply to the minor 
orders, the lodges whose o'bject is in- 
surance, patriotism or mere sociability? 
Why not except these from your indict- 
ment?" I freely admit that there is a 
great difference in the aims and meth- 
ods of different secret orders ; neverthe- 
less, there are two things which make 
them all alike su'bject to condemnation: 
The first is their secrecy. Recently 
about one hundred an'd fifty of our 
school pupils have written essays on the 
subject, "What is the Harm in a Glass 
of Beer?" The answer in one word is 
alcohol, concerning whose poisonous ef- 
fects, even when taken in small quanti- 
ties, science is more and more plainly 
assuring us. The subtle poison in all 
secret orders, from the highest to the low- 
est, is the pledge of secrecy, the 
vow, often confirmed by an oath, to con- 
ceal secrets of which the candidate at 
that stage knows nothing. Such a pledge 
of secrecy no man or woman has a right 
to take. It is undemocratic and un- 
christian. Opponent's of the temperance 
pledge assert that it is an infringement 
of personal liberty. To bind one's self 
'by a solemn promise to do a thing which 
one knows will result only in good to 
one's self and others, is not a surrender 
of personal liberty. Not one of us be- 
lieves that it is. Far different is the 
case of the man or woman who vows 
to conceal and to do things of which he 
or she knows nothing. Such men and 
women definitely place themselves in the 
power of those who administer such 
oaths or vows. If this is not a' surren- 
der of personal liberty, of manhood and 
womanhood, surely nothing is. The 
term Free Mason, as some one has said, 
is a misnomer. Self-respect alone should 
withhold one from such vows. Such was 
the belief of William H. Seward, Sec- 
retarv of State during the Civil War: 



172 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



''Before I would place my hand between 
the hand of other men in a secret lodge, 
order, class or council, and, bending on 
my knee before them, enter into com- 
bination with them for any object, per- 
sonal or political, good or bad, I would 
pray to God that that hand and that knee 
might be paralyzed, and that I might he- 
come an object of pity and even the 
mo'ckery of my fellowmen." 

Some one protests, ''But the home is a 
secret society." I answer, the home — if 
I may call it a home — of Mrs. Belle 
Gunness, the La Porte murderess, might 
have been a secret society; the Bender 
family of Kansas, who once waylaid and 
murdered travelers, was a secret society ; 
but no home as ordinarily constituted is 
a secret society. Think a moment: do 
you demand from every man and wom- 
an that crosses your threshold a solemn 
vow to "ever conceal and never reveal" 
what they see within your walls? The 
supposition is absurd. Secrecy must be 
distinguished from privacy. A gentle- 
man changes his linen in private, but he 
makes no secret of the fact. 

I said there are two reasons for hold- 
ing aloof from all secret orders, of what- 
ever nature. The second is this : they 
are all, even the most innocent, more or 
less directly, of Masonic parentage. The 
Cyclopedia of Fraternities says : "Few 
who are well informed on the subject 
will deny that the Masonic Fraternity 
is directly or indirectly the parent or- 
ganization of all modern secret societies, 

good, bad and indifferent." On 

pave xvi: "It was between 1723 and 
1740 that the parent modern secret so- 
ciety spread from England throughout 
Europe and into the British colonies. 
After the American war of the Revolu- 
tion it became, with one or two political 
secret societies founded by Freemasons, 
the direct or indirect source of all secret 
societies formed in America since that 
time." 

As our temperance pledge denies us 
the use of wine, beer, and even cider, so 
opposition to Freemasonry, if carried to 
a logical conclusion, should withhold us 
from sanctioning any order, however 
worthy Its motives, which exacts a 
pledge of secrecy. 

The argument which bulks largest 



with the defenders of secret orders, is 
the "good man" argument. "How can 
an institution be evil that contains so 
many good men?" I met last winter a 
lady who admitted all the arguments 
against organized secrecy, but over- 
threw them all, to her own satisfaction^ 
at least, by saying, "My hushand was an 
Odd Fellow, and he was one of the best 
men that ever lived." 

The truth is that the greatest villanles 
known could all be justified by the "good 
man" argument. Abraham, the Father 
of the Faithful, was a polygamist and a 
slaveholder. David, the man after God's 
own heart, was a murderer and an 
adulterer. Every species of crime has 
had the sanction of some good man's ex- 
ample. Mrs. Browning says : 

"I have known good wives, 
As cbaste, or nearly so, as Potiphar's; 
And good, good mothers, who would use a 

child 
To better an intrigue; good friends, beside,. 
(Very good) who hung succinctly round 

your neck 
And sucked your breath, as cats are fabled 

to do 
By sleeping infants. And we all have known 
Grood critics, who have stamped out poets' 

hopes; 
Good statesmen, who pulled ruin on the 

state; 
Good patriots, who for a theory risked a 

cause; 
Good kings, who disembowelled for a tax; 
Good popes, wiho brought all good to 

jeopardy; 
Good Christians, who sate still in easy 

chairs. 
And damned the general world for standing 

up — 
Now, may the good God pardon all good 

men!" 

The truth is, that, good or bad, we 
are all more or less inconsistent, if not 
In our beliefs, at least in our conduct. 
We Christians are all worse than our 
creed, hut it seems probable, as Presi- 
dent King says, that Masons and lodge 
members generally, are better than the 
system to which they- adhere. Some of 
you may not know that President, then 
Professor, King delivered a Thursday 
lecture condemning secret societies^ 
nineteen years and a half ago, which I 
had the pleasure of hearing. At least 
four of Oherlln's presidents have defi- 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



173 



nitely expressed their disapproval of or- 
ganized secrecy. It is true, however, 
that as a pure and exalted creed has an 
uplifting influence on him who profess- 
es it, so an immoral system, like or- 
ganized secrecy, has a degrading in- 
fluence on its supporters. 

An aged member of our Union, who 
has recently passed away, said to me 
when I last called on her : "I feel that 
I ought to warn people against this 
lodge snare, but what can I do?" The 
historic First Church, the church of 
President Finney, who wrote a book de- 
nouncing Masonry, has a rule refusing 
admission to mem'bers of secret orders. 
That rule is violated without protest. 
The Knights of King Arthur, a semi-se- 
cret order for hoys, an order whose aims 
are most laudable, and whose ritual is 
based on the beautiful and inspiring 
Arthurian legend, but whose indirect in- 
fluence is sure to weaken the barriers 
against organized secrecy, is one of the 
recognized activities of that as of many 
other churches. I saw in Boston last 
winter a pamphlet written by a minister 
— a pamphlet advertised in at least one 
of our denominational publications — 
lauding the fraternities as models for 
the church. I have heard similar lauda- 
tions from the pulpit. They have sad- 
dened me beyond words. Fraternity, as 
a principle, is of divine origin. Christ 
condescends to call Himself our Elder 
Brother, and says to the members of His 
Church, "Ye all are brethren." But the 
fellowship of Christ means no pur- 
chased and stinted ''benevolence," de- 
nied to those who most need it. Like the 
"wisdom that comes from above," it is 
"without partiahty and without hypoc- 
risy." On two occasions Masons have 
said to me, touching the button pinned to 
the lapel, "This has been a great help 
to me." Why should a self-respecting, 
ambitious, industrious man ask for spe- 
cial privileges? He may say, "I have 
paid for them all ;" but those who most 
need them are generally least able to pay 
for them — that is, wdien they are privi- 
leges that any man may lawfully claim. 
The Word of God says : "So then, as 
we have opportunity, let us work that 
which is good toward all men, and espe- 
cially toward them that are of the house- 



hold Qf the faith" (Gal. 6:io). Gen- 
uine benevolence is never exclusive. 

For Christian pastors to hold up the 
lodge before the Churdli as a model of 
attractiveness, is very like the conduct of 
the minister who blamed the missionary 
meeting for being less seductive than the 
card party. I am tempted to adopt the 
bold imagery of Scripture and suggest 
that for the Church to praise the lodge is 
like a wife's making friendly advances 
to her rival in her husband's affections. 

Is there any hope that this widespread 
delusion as to the real nature and in- 
fluence of secret societies will ever be re- 
moved? Do we believe that the liquor 
traffic will be overthrown? — that the 
"white slave" traffic will be abolished ? — 
that race and class animosities will be 
overcome?^ — that in a word, the king- 
dom of Christ will one day triumph? 
The only answer of the Christian to all 
these questions is an affirmative. We do 
not lack signs of promise to confirm our 
h^pe of the ultimate overthrow of or- 
ganized secrecy. A small, but intrepid 
and persistent body of men and women 
are banded together to shed light on the 
realm of darkness. Many ecclesiastical 
bodies, such as the Roman Catholics, the 
Lutherans, the United and Reformed 
Presbyterians, the Quakers and others, 
maintain a clear and definite testimony 
against the lodge. Some of our ablest 
leaders in Church and state have borne 
witness against it. Frances W^illard 
said in 1892, "I have always been op- 
posed to secret societies, and never more 
so than to-day. My whole record is 
against them." 

Throughout the entire United States, 
a practically unanimous sentiment has 
developed among school authorities 
against the high school fraternities as 
undemocratic and unwholesome, destruc- 
tive of scholarship and promotive of 
faction. Intrigue, lawlessness and immor- 
ality. The time will come when sensible 
men will see that the worst of these ob- 
jections, as well as others still more 
weighty, apply with equal force to all se- 
cret fraternities. And finally, the Word 
of God assures us that all the works of 
darkness will be destroyed by the bright- 
ness of our Lord's coming. 



174 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 





®lf(t 



"A voice that in the distance far away wakens ttic slumbering ages.'* 
"We hold : 4. That the charters of all Secret Lodges granted by our Federal aiiO 
State Legislatures should be withdrawn and their oaths prohibited by law." — Am- 
erican Party Platform. 

Thaddeus Stevens, a prominent Republican politician, held — "By Freemasonry, 
trial by jury is transformed into an engine of despotism and Masonic fraud." 

President Fillmore, J. C. Spencer and others: — "The Masonic fraternity tramples 
upon our rights, defeats the administration of justice, and bids defiance to every 
governinent which it cannot control." 

Judge Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States, decided: — "The institution 
of Masonry ought to be abandoned as one capable of much evil and incapable of 
producing any good which might not be effected by safe and open means." 

William Wirt, Attorney General of the United States, speaking of Freemasonry, 
affirmed: — "I view it as at war with the fundamental principles of the social corn- 
pact, and a wicked conspiracy against the laws of God and man, that ought to be 
put down." 

John Quincy Adams, President of the United States, declared: — "I am prepared 
to complete the demonstration before God and man, that the Masonic oaths, obli- 
gations and penalties cannot by any possibility be reconciled to the laws of moral- 
ity, of Christianity, or of the land." 

Charles Francis Adams: — "Every man who takes a Masonic oath forbids himself 
from divulging any criminal act, unless it might be murder or treason, that may 
be communicated to him under the seal of fraternal bond, even though such con- 
cealment were to prove a burden upon his conscience and a violation of his bound • 
en duty to society and to his God." 

Charles Sumner, an eminent American statesman, in 1854, penned these words : 
"I find two powers here in Washington in harmony, and both are antagonistical 
to our free institutions, and tend to centralization and anarchy — Freemasonry and 
Slavery; and they must both be destroyed if our country is to be the home of the 
free as our ancestors designed it." 

ThurlouJ Weed, the Warwick of American politics for more than half a century., 
testified: — "I now look back through an interval of fifty-six years with a conscious 
sense of having been governed through the Anti-Masonic excitement by a sincere 
desire, first to vindicate the violated laws of my country, and next, to arrest the 
great power and dangerous influences of Secret Societies." 

William H, Seward, Secretary of the United States under President Lincoln said : 
"Before I would place my hand between the hands of other men in a secret lodge, 
order, class, or council, and, bending on my knee before them, enter into combina- 
tion with them for any object, personal or political, good.or bad, I would pray to 
God that that hand and thatknee might be paralyzed, and that I might become an 
object of pity and even the mockery of my fellow-men." 

lVe/7(ye// P^/V/Zps, America's most popular orator, wrote: — "I wish you success 
most heartily in your efforts to arouse the community to the danger of Secret So- 
cieties. They are a great evil; entirely out of place in a republic, and no patriot 
should join or uphold them. Considering the great forces which threaten the wel- 
fare of the nation in the next thirty years, and how readily and efficiently they can 
use any secret organizations, such should not be allowed to exist. ' 

President George Washington's Farewell Address: — "The very idea of the power 
and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every 
individual to obey the established government. All obstructions to the execution 
of the laws, all combinations and associations, under whatever plausible character, 
with the real design to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation 
and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fundamental prin- 
ciple, and of fatal tendency." 

Daniel Webster, Secretary of State in the cabinets of Harrison, Tyler, and Fill, 
more avowed: — "All secret associations, the members of which take upon them- 
selves extraordinary obligations to one another, and are bound together by secret 
oaths, are naturally sources of jealousy and just alarm to others; are especially un- 
./avorable to iiarmony and mutual confidence among men living together under 



October, 1909. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 175- 



popular institutions, and are dangerous vo the general cause of civil liberty and' 
just government. Under the influence of this conviction it is my opinion that the 
future administration of all such oaths and the formation of all such obligations- 
should be prohibited by laAv." 

Such, reader, is the unimpeachable testimony of a host of men first and foremost 
in American politics and history. And now let a few popular newspapers be 
heard. 

Saint Louis Vanguard: — Masonry is a stupendous sham. The wonder is how" 
such a despicable farce could find support. 

Syracuse (N. Y.) American Wesleyan: — Secret Societies are the natural hot-bed 
of "murder and treason not excepted." No matter how pious their pretensions, 
keep clear of the whole tyled and curtained clan. 

North American Review: — Incorporation is a privilege granted associations on 
the ground of public utility. It follows logically that it is an abuse and a fiction to 
incorporate a Secret Society of any kind. 

Rochester (N. Y.) Earnest Christian: — Secret Societies. These are becoming so 
dangerous to civil institutions that some nations of Europe suppress them by law. 
In this country their influence is fast becoming all controlling in both Church and 
State. 

Washington Sword: — We congratulate the Anti-Secrecy Reform movement in 
its acquisition of a valuable and substantial edifice in this city, to be used as the 
"headquarters" of this branch of the work. Thus a "battery" is planted in the 
national capitol, which we trust will vigorously open and continue its fire upon the- 
"enemy" until an unconditional surrender is forced upon them. 

United Presbyterian: — One of the great hindrances to right governmental deal- 
ing in Ireland grows out of the existence of Secret Societies. They are habitually 
plotting anarchy. It is so always in everyplace. Secret, hidden caballing arr.ong 
men for any purpose is one of the worst kinds of villainy, and it is to this that se- 
cretism inevitably leads. 

Sandy Lake News: — Had Fagan not joined the secret band of murderers that, 
took th e life of Burke and Cavendish, he would not have paid the penalty of com- 
plicity in the bloody crime of this clandestine and lawless combination Avilh his. 
life on the gallows. He sowed to the wind and reaped the whirlwind. He joined 
hands with a Secret Society and shared the doom and disgrace that attached to the 
murders they cominitted. 

Toledo Blade: — No man has a right to place himself where he has no moral con- 
trol of his own actions; yet this is what he does when he joins a Secret Society 
and binds himself to blindly obey all orders from headquarters without hesitation, 
or thought of whether tiiey are right or wrong. Indeed he dares not question the- 
mandates of these persons whom he does not know. He must simply do as he is. 
bidden, even though it makes him a partner in the most atrocious crimes, when he- 
has no intention of committing a moral wrong. The lesson these disclosures, 
teach is to become a meiuber of no society whose purposes are not openly declar- 
ed, to take no oaths to obey persons whose very names are unknown. 

New York Witness: — Secret Societies for treasonable purposes have received a 
death-blow in Ireland in two ways. First, it has been inade quite clear that these 
secrets cannot be kept froin the government. Second, The Pope has denounced 
Secret Societies with more emphasis than ever before, and required all bishops and. 
priests to do the same. Third, Their grand mistake is made clear to all the poor 
dupes who take oaths to obey blindly, eveVi to the extent of committing murder, 
leaders whom they do not know, only to be given up by those leaders to be hang- 
ed when the time of trial comes ; and such dupes are likely to be scarce in the- 
future. 

Chicago Daily Times: — Secret Societies are dangerous because young men and 
others who are not for the moment fully mindful of their public duties may be led 
by persuasion under the influence of the peculiar solemnity and impressiveness of 
an initiation, which unseats their judgment, to take oaths which are inconsistent 
with their duties towards the State and society, and which they may regret, in 
moments of reflection, that they have taken. 

Hastings (Neb.) Weekly Gazette-Journal: — The day for cliques and rings has 

fone by. Open and frank methods in politics are the only kind that will win. 
air dealing and honest action will 50 farther than craft, cimnmg, and underhand- 
ed scheming. Democrats, republicans, and anti-monopolists will do well to learn 
that fact. • Cornbinations and cabals are resorted to only by tliose who have not 
the public confidence necessary to successfully land them u\ otficial positions. 



176 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



SCHOOL FRATERNITIES. 

By Miss Geraldine C. Kellogg. 

Less than a century ago college fra- 
ternities were practically unknown in 
this country. They were born, grew to 
maturity, waxed strong and subtle, and 
for many years have ruled with a high 
hand. Just when or where they came 
into being annals fail to show% but as 
early as the year 1845 their harmful in- 
fluence on college and university life was 
felt. 

The high school fraternities, imitators 
of their older brothers, were first heard 
from about twenty years ago. These 
were inspired partly by a desire for a 
different social life in the schools, and 
partly by principals who had considered 
their own college societies beneficial. 
Little did these well-meaning gentlemen 
realize what an evil influence they were 
inaugurating. 

Perhaps no more striking parallel can 
be drawn to the development of these 
institutions than that of the growth of 
a child deprived of proper parental con- 
trol. Weak and helpless as an infant 
at first, little or no anxiety was felt 
for their future conduct. They were 
seemingly harmless and that was enough. 
After a few years they began to show 
traits of character. They were bright 
and cute and their smart pranks provok- 
ed applause from many onlookers. But 
a spirit of willfulness and deceit was 
also displayed, and some school boards 
began to awaken to the fact that they 
had an unpleasant problem to solve and 
that the sooner it was undertaken the 
easier it V\^ould be for all concerned. 
Wisely they investigated, consulted and 
applied the necessary and effective dis- 
cipline. Others, like foolish, near-sighted 
parents, petted and pampered and occa- 
sionally scolded, but overlooking the 
clanger ahead permitted them to take 
their own course. 

Still they grew and multiplied, and 
as strong lusty children, care free, care- 
less, confident of their powers, they 
showed a daring and impudent spirit. 
The fact that all planning and working 
was done secretly encouraged defiant 
audacity. On they went through the 
time of "wild oats sowing" with a reck- 



lessness that was appalling, little regard- 
ing the mandates of the ruling powers, 
until they have become the dominating 
element in the schools and any attempt 
to check their wild career is accompanied 
by a threatened upheaval of all school 
discipline. 

The American college fraternities now 
number over six hundred. They are 
classed as local, general, professional and 
various women's societies. The local so- 
cieties make no eflr'ort to organize chap- 
ters in other institutions, but exist only 
in those schools in which they were 
founded. In Yale College three such 
societies are found in the senior class 
alone. The general societies have chap- 
ters in from four to sixty-four of our 
higher institutions. As chapter members 
only upper class men of the scientific, 
literary and classic departments 
(courses) are admitted. The chapter 
halls and buildings are as a rule luxuri- 
ously and extravagantly furnished. Rare 
tapestries, costly furniture and rich car- 
pets all tend to lure and delight. Over 
seventy chapter houses have cost a mil- 
lion dollars each. The social evenings 
present scenes of revelry, carousal and 
dissipation. Money is spent lavishly to 
make these occasions brilliant and 
unique. 

Prior to the year 1870 the form of 
government was very imperfect. Either 
the parent chapter undertook the gen- 
eral supervision of the numerous chap- 
ters started in other colleges, or one 
chapter after another assumed control, 
each one making such rules and regula- 
tions for the others as it deemed best. 
Naturally such a situation could not long 
hold without causing much friction and 
dissatisfaction. To remedy the evil an- 
nual society conventions were Introduced 
and administrative bodies formed to act 
as lawgivers and advisers. To the con- 
ventions delegations were sent from each 
society chapter and all former chapter 
members were invited. From this or- 
derly and systematic- arrangement has 
grown a powerful organization with all 
branches firmly cemented together. 

Many, who object to the high school 
fraternities on the ground that students 
of high school age are not competent to 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



177 



carry on such organizations without the 
direction of an older, more experienced 
mind, approve most decidedly of the col- 
lege and university societies. It is true 
that the societies in the higher institu- 
tions are to outward appearances more 
orderly. The members have outgrown 
much of the rashness of youth and stand 
more on their dignity. And, there are a 
few Greek letter societies which seem 
to merit approval to some extent, as the 
members pride themselves on high 
scholarship and do not hesitate to re- 
buke and assist those who are not up 
to the average in their recitations. But 
these are exceptions and even in these 
we must admit the spirit of selfishness 
and clannishness. President Dickie, of 
Albion College, showed the general na- 
ture of all college societies when he said, 
"Fraternities are expensive and are un- 
democratic and un-American. They sad- 
ly interfere with the social life of the 
college as a whole by the tendency to 
develop the clique spirit and to beget 
within members, almost unconsciously, a 
notion of personal superiority. It is 
clearly within the limits of our records 
to say that nearly all cases of college 
discipline occurring during the past five 
years have had to do either with these 
fraternal organizations or with fraternity 
members." 

It seems strange that any sane person, 
most of all a parent, can sanction the 
high school fraternities, and yet we hear 
of many who side with their children 
against the school authorities in defend- 
ing them. It may be that they are them- 
selves lodge members and would think 
it inconsistent in them to object to their 
children's holding membership in simi- 
lar organizations. Some who are not 
worthy the name of parent seem to care 
1-tlie what inlluences surround their chil- 
dren so long as they are popular in the 
select social circles and out of the way 
at home. But the prevailing sentiment is 
decidedly against the fraternities, and 
those who have the best opportunities to 
study the effects produced on school life 
and on individual character are imani- 
mous in their disapproval. A committee 
appointed to investigate these societies 
throughout the country and note their 



effects on high schools bring in this re- 
port: "They are selfish and tend to nar- 
row the minds and sympathies of the 
pupils ; they stir up strife and contention ; 
they dissipate energy and proper ambi- 
tion ; they set up wrong standards ; re- 
wards are not based on merit, but on 
fraternity vows (they are expensive and 
foster habits of extravagance) ; they 
bring politics into the legitimate organi- 
zation of the school ; they detract inter- 
est from study, and all legitimate ele- 
ments for good — social, moral and intel- 
lectual — which these societies claim to 
possess can better be supplied to the 
pupils through the school at large in 
tlie form of literary societies and clubs 
under the sanction and supervision of 
the faculties." 

President Eliot of Plarvard, referring 
to another phase of the subject, says: 
"The fraternities lie at the bottom of the 
whole trouble. They compel expenses 
which many parents cannot bear ; they 
create distinction of a social sort that 
make school life humiliating for those 
whose parents are not wealthy." Dean 
Shepardson of the University of Cali- 
fornia speaks of them as "detrimental to 
pupils in that they undermine character, 
and becomes fetishes to be worshiped by 
the young, creating disloyalty to parents 
and school." The complaint of Principal 
Robinson of Central high school, St. 
Paul, is, "Boys belonging to fraternities 
will lie, cheat and do anything to re- 
main loyal to their societies. The fra- 
ternity has developed professional liars 
in my school." And these educators ex- 
press the sentiments of the vast ma- 
jority. 

Perhaps the most harmful results are 
occasioned by the degrading and shame- 
ful initiations and hazings. Many of 
these go far beyond all bounds of de- 
cency. Physical injuries often prove 
serious. A common method of torture 
is the branding of the society monogram 
on the face of the initiate with acids. 
This practice has caused disfigurement 
for life in many cases. One victim, tied 
to a tree at night and left through a 
severe blizzard, nearly perished from ex- 
posure. Another unusually bright and 
capable youth was held under a pump 



178 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



in midwinter and cold water was pump- 
ed over him for so long that the after 
result was a stunted growth and idiocy. 
The case of the young man who was fas- 
tened on the railroad track and left to 
be crushed and mangled by the first train 
that passed has excited great indignation. 
Hundreds have come from the initiations 
with their nervous systems completely 
shattered and wrecked. Almost every 
imaginable means to terrify and torture 
is resorted to and the cases of fatality 
are legion. 

It is indeed true that "the darkest hour 
is just before the dawn," and already 
the morning of a brighter day is break- 
ing. The school boards and officers are 
not alone in fighting this monster for the 
leading magazines and newspapers of 
the country are doing their part to create 
public opinion. The Daily News in a 
recent editorial says, 'These societies 
have no proper place in schools support- 
ed by taxpayers. They are a source 
of expense to parents and seriously 
weaken the influence of both pa- 
rents and teachers upon the young." 
The Tribune, Review of Reviews, 
Ladies' Home Journal and others 
are not backward in expressing 
their views. In some of the largest and 
most influential cities, Chicago, Colum- 
bus, O. ; Washington, D. C. ; Kansas 
City, Mo. ; Portland, Maine, and in most 
of the States of the Union severe meas- 
ures are being taken against this great 
evil. Students v/ho are fraternity mem- 
bers are not allowed to take part in ath- 
letic or oratorical contests, and in many 
schools admittance is entirely refused 
them. If the fig'ht continues, as it no 
doubt will, there is every reason to hope 
that before many years pass this great 
curse of education, this blighter of char- 
acter will no longer darken our land. 

Wheaton, 111. 



€Mt0rial» 



NATIONAL PURITY CONGRESS. 
Burlington, Iowa, October 18=22, 1909. 

Fifth congress since 1901 on social 
purity, suppression of vice, white slave 
traffic and educational and religious 
methods. For information address B. 
S. Steadwell, president, La Crosse, Wis. 



MYSTIC=RITEDOM. 

Speaking of the decision of the Gov- 
ernor of Georgia not to approve a bill 
making it a misdemeanor to wear a 
badge or pin, or to use the name of a 
secret order without express authoriza- 
tion, a well-known paper adds that 
" 'Mystic-Ritedom' in Georgia will worry 
along with the status quo/' A citizen 
of Georgia had said to the Governor : 
"There ' are 15,000 negro members of 
secret orders in the State .... the bill, 
if it becomes a law will tend to discour- 
age thousands of negroes, and I would 
not be surprised to see at least 50,000 of 
them leave the State and go to places 
where they may enjoy the privileges de- 
nied them here." 

The bill would probably have killed 
many of the negro lodges and might 
thus have benefited the colored people; 
yet, on the other hand, it may be better 
in the end to have the aristocratic gla- 
mor tarnished for Georgians by the 
show of negro lodges and trappings. 
White Odd Fellows and white Knights 
of Pythias had persistently striven to se- 
cure such a law as the legislature, final- 
ly yielding, had now passed; yet, after 
all, the Governor withstood the scheme, 
thus saying the colored lodges. No 
doubt the negroes recognize him as a 
friend; yet in eft'ect he may have been 
an enemy, whatever were his feelings. 

If we remember rightly, the article 
from which we have quoted also used 
the word Mystic-Riteism. Two terms 
of possible usefulness appear to have 
been added to the vocabulary available 
to anti-secretists. We do not know who 
Coined the word lodgery, but might 
guess it to have been the senior Dr. 
Blanchard, or one of his early comrades 
in this warfare.. Secretist, secretism and 
lodgism, might seem rather convenient 
terms, yet perhaps no single word hith- 
erto used could hold its ground against 
a new one that would be satisfactory. 
For naming the whole body of adherents 
and their system in one word, there is 
aptness in this name Mysticritedom. 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



179 



AN UNLAWFUL CUSTOM. 

''These men being Jews, do exceeding- 
ly trouble our city and teach customs 
which are not lawful for us to receive, 
neither to observe, being Romans," was 
the complaint brought before the magis- 
trate bv the masters of the Philippian 
girl from whom the spirit of divination 
had departed. Their accusation derived 
point from the fact that what was 
preached was the name of Jesus, while 
it is to be noticed that the very exorcism 
was in the name of Jesus Christ. 

Nevertheless, the Master himself had 
authorized and enjoined the use of His 
name, saying: 'Tf ye shah ask any- 
thing in ^Nly name that will I do, that 
the Father may be glorilied in the Son. 
If ye shall ask anything in My name, 
that will I do." Again He said: 
•'Hitherto have ye asked nothing in My 
name; ask and ye shall receive, that 
your jov mav be made full" ; and pres- 
entlv He added: 'Tn that day ye shall 
ask 'in My name." Such prayer was in- 
cluded or connected with customs held 
unlav/ful for Romans. 

Prayer in the name of Jesus is still 
accounted unlawful by some who ap- 
pear emulous of Roman ideas and cus- 
toms. They seem to make Jesus one 
who incites breaking law. The question, 
'Ts it lawful for a chaplain to commence 
and finish his prayer in the name of 
Chnst?" having been formally asked and 
offici:.lly answered, its decision involves 
among' the great mass of religions in 
the world "Christianity is a sect," and 
prayer "savoring of sect is not to be tol- 
erated." 

This rule of Odd Fellowship agrees 
with that of Freexna?onry. One impres- 
sion which it made when the Grand 
Sire of the Soverign Grand Lodge of 
tliC World formall) stated the old prin- 
ciple in answer to a fresh inquiry, may 
be inferred from a resolution presented 
oniv three yeais later in the Grand 
Lodge of the lower provinces of British 
North America, which cannot be classi- 
fied with attacks on secret orders from 
outside. With the resolution, we quote 
its ..bird preamble: 

''Whereas, The decision of the Grand 



Sire places our order on record as hav- 
ing put a ban on the name of Christ; 

"Resolved, That this Grand Lodge pe- 
tition the Soverign Grand Lodge to re- 
verse the decision of the Grand Sire as 
arven in 1888, in relation to the name of 
Christ and prayer, and permit perfect 
toleration in matters of conscience in all 
our grand and subordinate lodges." 

Such toleration not being allowable, 
the use of Jesus Christ's name continues 
to be unlawful, since Odd Fellow law 
annuls Christian law, while the Grand 
Sire of the order outranks in effective- 
ness of authority the King of Kings. 

TERMS OF FRATERNAL BENEFITS. 

On what terms fraternal benefits can 
be obtained is a question anti-secret 
workers or those who agree with them 
may sometimes wish to answer, at least 
to their own minds. The April assess- 
ment of the A. O. U. W. in Arizona 
throws hght on the subject of fraternal 
benefits, and although the definiteness of 
its statements with the fulness of its ex- 
plications, is primarily meant for the in- 
struction or admonition of members, yet 
others can avail themselves of its advan- 
tages in learning about fraternalism and 
its care of widows and orphans. 

A, O. U. W. Temple, Tucson, Arizona, 

April 1, 1909. 

Dear Sir and Brother: You and your 
lodge are hereby ofScially notified of the 
following Call for the month of April, 1909, 
and your dues. 

All assessments are due and payable by 
you to the Financier of your Subordinate 
Lodge on or before the 28th of this month, 
or your Beneficiary Certificate, by law, will 
stand suspended until the same be paid, and 
you become reinstated by a majority vote of 
your Subordinate Lodge. If you neglect pay- 
ment for three months, you will be required 
to again pass a physical examination and 
the same be approved by the Grand Medical 
Examiner, before your lodge can consider 
your application for reinstatement. Should 
your death occur during the suspension of 
your certificate, your beneficiary could not 
under the law, be paid. After receiving this 
notice, it is your duty to hunt up the Finan- 
cier and pay the assessment before the 2Sth. 
It is not the duty of the Financier to hunt 
you; nor can he receive the assessment from 
you one minute after the 2Sth. without vio- 
lating the law and his obligation of office. 



180 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



After the 28tli you must send your arrear- 
ages, together with your application for re- 
instatement, to the lodge, and await their 
action. 

Similarly business-like is the charity 
of the Royal Arcanum toward widows 
and orphans of deceased brethren. Why 
have not life insurance companies much 
the same right to hold memorial services 
and as'k to be invited to church once a 
3^ear to be flattered and advertised by the 
minister? We take the following note 

from the Arcanum Bulletin: 

Paragraph 7 of Section 433 relating to lia- 
bility of assessments was added at the last 
session of the Supreme Council. It is as 
follows: "Each member shall be liable for 
every assessment payable after the date of 
his receiving the degree to, and including, 
the assessment for the .month in which his 
death shall occur." 

Now, we don't object to having busi- 
ness done according to rule and by a 
method that can be used for the benefit 
of tlie whole membership taken together. 
What we do object to is sanctimonious- 
ness and brag. Suppose that someone is 
so ill in that last month of his life that 
he cannot attend to an assessment; sup- 
pose that he is ill of a lingering disease 
for several months ; where will his fam- 
ily be then? Even the old line company, 
niaking no great show of piety or benev- 
olence, will not be so hard as the fra- 
ternal order, in its treatment of this 
man's widow and orphans ; for it will 
lend money on the policy, or it will 
change it to a paid up policy, and pay, 
after all, so far as the business has 
already gone. It will not be so hard as 
the other, rigid as both are. Why then 
should the other boast so much of its 
fraternity toward men and of its charity 
or benevolence toward those who survive 
them? 



THE GOOD AND HARM OF HAZING. 

Snobbery may exist to some degree among 
boy students, but, after all, student life 
comes as near to pure democracy as any- 
thing we can reach in this vale of tears. 
Without any particular realization of his 
duty to the body politic, the second-year lad 
believes that the chief duty of his life is to 
seek out among the new-comers those who 
have "swelled heads," and rectify that con- 
dition at once. And it is the best thing that 
can happen to the possessor of the head! 



Now all this is true enough, but the truth 
of it does not in the least permit of unli- 
censed brutality on the part of thoughtless, 
half-baked "cubs" (and we use the phrase 
with no apologies, in full recollection of our 
sophomoric days), nor does it absolve pro- 
fessors and instructors froim responsibility 
for the proper control of the undeveloped 
manlings in their care. 

A freshman with a false view of his own 
importance will have his mental attitude 
corrected in a thousand ways; the simple 
contact with a hundred boys who are his 
equals (whereas at hoime he met with none) 
is enough to do the business. Any college 
president or school principal is unfit for his 
position of trust if he claims that broken 
heads or maimed bodies or even violent and 
diabolical public ihumiliation should be 
winked at, in view of the good that it might 
do. We do not believe in the wholesale de- 
velopment of mollycoddles, but, on the other 
hand, educational institutions are not estab- 
lished to incubate bullies. 

Those concluding sentences hardly fa- 
vor organized hazing institutions with 
buildings in which tO' carry on their busi- 
ness with freshmen. If the fraternity 
jiouse is a hazing shop built and man- 
aged with the leading purpose of con- 
cealment, and if initiation is in good part 
hazing, the purpose of an educational 
institution is a subject worth meditating 
upon, and the mutual relations of fra- 
ternity houses and class rooms are worth 
considering. 



YALE DORMITORIES. 

Sheffield Scientific School of Yale 
University has begun to build its own 
dormitories, and is giving prominence to 
the fraternity house question. Six of 
these houses belonging to societies of the 
Scientific School represent a large value. 

In his annual report the director de- 
clares that the interests of the societies 
and the interests of scholarship antagon- 
ize each other. Society men are condi- 
tioned disproportionately for deficient 
scholarship ; outsiders escape condition- 
ing in better ratio. Freshmen bringing 
good or fair scholarship are often drop- 
ped at the end of the first year or even 
the first term if they join societies, be- 
cause they fail in scholarship. The state 
of afifalrs has been demoralizing and the 
director gives warning that unless those 
more directly interested find an early so- 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



181 



lution, the governing board will remedy 
the unquestionable evils. 



OPEN SOCIETIES. 

Who that ever belonged to a literary 
society in the old school dormitory can 
forget its cliarm? Recollections tinged 
with the mellow tone of lengthening 
years almost restore the thrill he felt 
when life was new. Was it not a special 
dignity to be entitled to sit in one of 
those arm chairs even in the farthest 
row? The emblazoned banner set in a 
front corner of the room and resplendant 
with a Latin legend or a society name ; 
the official desk at the front, and the 
literary case with its glazed doors in the 
rear, the whole furnishing of the carpet- 
ed room, taken as a whole, provided the 
tyro something to live up to and to serve 
.with loyalty. 

Evenings spent here harmonized with 
school days spent in study rooms or 
class rooms. Here were brought to Hght 
essays, which, like orations and declama- 
tions, were school exercises in effect, yet 
not school tasks. The charm of society 
membership invested genuine work, 
which seemed not to be done at the be- 
hest of the faculty. " 

But the debate. Ah, the debate ! That 
central feature of the scene, when Brown 
on the one hand and Jones on the other 
had ranged their chosen gladiators to 
follow them to the contested sands. It 
was there that the young student began 
that practice which, later on, stood him 
in stead, in many a battle in that arena 
where questions take on the seriousness 
of life and death issues. 

In the halls of these open societies, 
young men were formerly practicing the 
art of thinking and speaking promptly 
while doing mental work under the pres- 
sure of embarrassing or exciting cir- 
cumstances, who have since faced larger 
audiences from pulpit and platform, or 
preserved their steadiness in the court 
room. In these societies parliamentary 
practice was learned, speaking and writ- 
ing were practiced and the art of think- 
ing was cultivated where debate answer- 
ed the end of immediate criticism of 
youthful reasoning. 

We cannot regret that these scenes so 
dear to memory were unmarred by fea- 



tures more recently shown where secrecy 
is a leading idea. Unnatural and for- 
eign ceremonies with forms of personal 
abuse do not distort the picture. Fool- 
ish obligations and vicious practices are 
no more remembered of the society hall 
than of the class room, and the old soci- 
ety itself is cherished among the untarn- 
islied jewels preserved by memory. 

If this is the mature judgment left aft- 
er the lapse of many years, surely it can 
be applied to that new movement under- 
taken in this city by Superintendent 
Young. Even if the clubs first organ- 
ized here are more social than literary, 
they may the more directly meet the 
special emergency arising where secret 
orders are newly forbidden. In due time 
literary features can be added, and new 
literary clubs can be formed. Substitu- 
tion is the complementary color of pro- 
iiibition. Better in form and result, open 
societies satisfy that demand to which 
secret orders claim to respond, and if 
rightly planned and conducted they can- 
nut fail to form an important agency co- 
operating with the school. 



UNIVERSAL CO- MASONRY. 

The Theosophic Messenger for June 
has much to say about the ''two world- 
wide societies, the Theosophic Society 
and the Masonic Fraternity." It devotes 
special attention to Co-jNlasonry, wdiich 
has headquarters in Paris, France. In- 
dia, moreover, has seven lodges of Uni- 
versal Co-Masonry, and the R. W. M. 
of "The Rising Sun of India Lodge" in 
Madras is Annie Besant, the noted theo- 
sophist. The following details enter in- 
to tlie composition of her Masonic des- 
ignation : "Very Illustrious Vice-Presi- 
dent ; Grand Master, 33d Degree, P. M. ; 
Hon. R. W. M., "Human Duty Lodge," 
No. 6 (London) Alcmber of the Su- 
preme Council; Or. Ins. Gen. of Britain 
and the British Dependencies." 

This CoMasonry, dear to the Theo- 
sophic cult, seems to be virtually Scot- 
tish Rite Masonry, with an English con- 
stitution granted by the Supreme Coun- 
cil ; so that while French Masons do not 
UiC the title Grand Architect of the Uni- 
verse, the Co- Masons of France are yet 
allowed to boiieve in a Creative Principle 
recognized under that name. 



182 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



l\venty-one mere men and nine wom- 
en compose Miss Besant's Indian lodge; 
possibly in that coimtry this does not 
give the women a majority, yet they 
]iave a woman Master. These Masons 
of Rising Sun Lodge are to have a tem- 
ple, the foundation of which was laid 
December 28, 1908, when nearly one 
hundred Masons ranging from the E. A. 
to the 33d degree and including, with 
Christians, Hindus, Buddhists and Par- 
sees, were in attendance as participants. 
Miss Besant spread the mortar on the 
cube of granite on which was inscribed : 
''This stone v/as well and truly laid in 
tlie name of the G. A. O. T. U. on De- 
cember 28, 1908, by Very Illustrious 
Sister Annie Besant, 33d degree, Vice- 
President of the Supreme Council of 
Universal Co-Masonry." 

An article in the Messenger written 
by Annie Besant, says in part: ^'Co-Ma- 
sonry has arisen from the bottom of 
masculine JMasonry in order to bring 
women into that ancient fraternity on 
exactly the same terms as men, and thus 
to restore the whole brotherhood to the 
position from which it fell when it 'broke 
its link with the ancient Mysteries." 

''Some feeble attempts to win 

the aid of women have been made by the 
institution, from time to time, of Rites 
of Adoption." .... 'Tn America many 
such lodges are flourishing under the 
name of the E. St. (Eastern Star). But 
Adoptive Masonry is no more Masonry 
than the orders of the Good Templars 
and the Odd Fellows are Masonry." 
. . . . "Co-Masonry began with the 
initiation of a woman in a masculine 
lodge with uncurtailed ceremonial. . . . 
*''\Vomen Masons are now found all over 
the world." .... "The bandage has 
fallen from their eyes, they have risen, 
and nothing that any Grand Lodge or 
Supreme Council can do, can deprive 
them of the knowledge and of the posi- 
tion they have won." 

"Uncurtailed ceremonial" is a phrase 
pregnant with implication. Every man 
initiated into the third degree enters the 
lodge room blindfolded, yet in full view 
of all sitting within. His dress is com- 
posed of two garments, a pair of draw- 
ers and a shirt which the ceremony re- 
quires to be wide open over the breast 



from the neck down. Both sleeves must 
be rolled above the elbows, both legs of 
the drawers above the knee. By any 
covering of the chest, legs or arms, 
abridging the arrangement of clothing 
here indicated the ceremonia] would be 
curtailed and thus would not "bring 
women into that ancient fraternity on 
exactly the same terms as men." An 
important part of the "uncurtailed cere- 
monial" demands exposure of both the 
breasts of every man initiated into the 
lliird degree, Vviiile the third degree is 
indispensable to the full initiation of the 
Mason. 



DANCING HEPTASOPHS. 

It is startling — if one may not say 
shocking — to catch in the first glance 
at the I. O. H. Advocate the name Beu- 
lah, associated with the announcement, 
in display type, of the fourth annual 
show and dance. Bunyan must have 
taken that name from the second chap- 
ter of Isaiah ; the land in which the Lord 
delighted would be called by that title; 
Bunyan's pilgrim was in peaceful felic- 
ity when he said that with which the 
saint of God was about to depart since 
comforted hearts about to mourn: "I 
am in the Land of Beulah." So sacred 
is the word with hallowed associations, 
that not without pain — hardly without 
hesitation — do we repeat here its use by 
the organ of the Improved Order of 
Heptasophs ; yet we do risk copying the 
page, in the midst of which, assisting the 
broad display, is a large group picture: 

"Fourth annual show and dance of 
Beulah Conclave, No. 296, Friday even- 
ing, April 2nd, 1909 (the date is given 
twice, being printed on each side of the 
picture), Duquene Garden Ampitheater. 
Minstrel show 8 :30 p. m. sharp. No 
persons seated after the performance is 
started. Dancing begins at 10 :3o p .m. 
You are invited to spend 25 cents for 
admission and a good time." An article 
— or rather news-letter, on an inside 
page, headed "Beulah of Pittsburg," be- 
gins : "Do you see us on the front 
page? It is our turn to be in the lime- 
light, and we don't want anyone to lose 
sight of the fact that we want all the 
glimmer and glare that the big glow- 
worm can sfive us." The writer an- 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



nounces ''the peerless Nirella Orchestra 
as the music," and he assures his read- 
ers : "It isn't the monetary consideration 
we are after—it is just simply to show 
the general public the kind of talent we 
have in this Conclave." And the con- 
clave is called Beulah ! 



MASSACHUSETTS ODD FELLOWSHIP. 

It may not be generally known that 
the decision of 1888 condemning the use 
of the name of Jesus in lodge prayers 
offered in Odd Fellow lodges was drawn 
out by the Massachusetts grand lodge, 
and having been received by that lodge 
was accepted as its law. It may fairly 
be supposed that many who join lodges 
are wholly ignorant of the rule ; indeed, 
they probably in many cases continue so 
through years of membership. It is a 
relief to hope so, and we think that this 
is true. We believe it to be true also of 
many Masons. Yet some Odd Fellows 
know, some Masons know, and some are 
both Odd P^ellows and Masons, so that 
the fact exists as one recognized. Mul- 
titudes have been living under its influ- 
c'lje, whatever the influence of such 
knowledge may Ije. 

This is sufficient reason for regret that 
in the first half of 1909 the net increase 
of membership was 616. Another fea- 
ture of the actual working of the order 
appears in the recent report : Total ex- 
penses other than relief not only equaled 
relief, but showed an excess of $36,420. 
Rebekah lodges at the same time spent 
in current expenses much more than five 
times the amount used in relief. 

Yet the relief feature is a great at- 
traction of both orders, the male and the 
female society. A great help in checking 
orders that make a point of trying to 
seem religious and moral while denying 
Christ, would be some sort of aid society 
as well managed as fire insurance, which 
is already a limited kind of relief sys- 
tem giving relief only in case of fire. It 
should be planned by those competent to 
make wise and safe plans ; its affairs 
should be in the hands of trained offi- 
cers. 

There can be no doubt that the Chris- 
tian church was from the first some 
such an institution ; at Jerusalem we find 



it when first mentioned, pursuing a 
course which made it impossible that 
there should be any among its members 
who were destitute. Again and again 
in the Gospels, The Acts and epistles we 
catch the idea of giving ; in fact, gener- 
osity is a sentiment pervading both Old 
Testament and New. Nowhere does the 
Bible teach a man to content himself 
witli being just. 

Tlie IVatchman, a religious journal 
published in Boston, said in an editorial 
printed in its issue tor :^eptembcr 9Lh: 
"Whatever may be their errors, there is 
discernable in the most of these present- 
Cay movements toward primitive Chiii- 
tianity, a revival of that spirit of love 
which was the distinguishmg character- 
istic of the early disci^jies of Christ. The 
fact that the early Christian preaching 
was the preacliing of love and charity, 
IS affectingly developed by Professor 
Adolph Ilarnack, in the third chapter of 
"The Expansion of Christianity in the 
First Three Centuries;" and he shows 
that this preaching and exhibition of love 
was the most potent force in the rapid 
spread of the early church." 

It is to be questioned whether the case 
of the church at Jerusalem has not been 
taken too much as exceptional, and not 
sufficiently as typical. And moreover,, 
the Odd Fellows of our own time may 
not have full warrant for disparaging 
comparison of the church with the lodge. 
If here and there can be found an Odd 
Fellows' Home, where initiates can re- 
tire in old age, are there not homes and 
hospitals surrounding such a home with: 
a cloud of witnesses to the generositv of 
churches, Christians and cities governed 
largely by Christian influences? Not in- 
frequently a denomination assumes re- 
sponsibility for such beneficence, so that 
we find a St. Luke's hospital, or a Bap- 
tist, or a Presbyterian hospital, or an 
old people's home supported by some de- 
nomination. Besides these are to be 
noted the charitable societies supported 
by churches, and educational institutions 
together with aid for indigent students 
attending them. That churches carry 
any kind of good work to the limit, no 
one claims; but that they wholly neglect 
benevolence, leaving relief of the needy 
to deniers of Christ who suppress His 



184 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



OctolDer, 1909. 



name, is not true. Much of Vv^hat orders 
do, demanding initiation and payment of 
dues to date, seems to us like fire insur- 
ance, and tlkit is what we have in mind 
when we say that similar insurance 
might well be effected without secret and 
anti-Christian excrescence to load it 
down. A good part of the vast mass of 
public and personal benevolence is al- 
ready free from such a burden ; if at any 
point some order is thought to fit some 
cases better, Vv'hy not expand the open 
system to the extent of incorporating 
a preferable equivalent so that there will 
be no temptation to prefer the lodge for 
the :^ake of such aid? 



A REGULAR NEGRO LODGE. 

The Grand Lodge of Mississippi has 
withdrawn Masonic relations from the 
Grand Lodge of New Jersey on account 
of Alpha Lodge, ii6, to which the N. J. 
Grand Lodge issued a charter 38 years 
ago. The very next year the Grand 
Master arrested the charter as having 
been obtained by fraud, but later the C-. 
L. restored it. The real cause of this ar- 
rest 37 years ago has been said to have 
been the admission of negro members. 
All white men have disappeared and Al- 
pha lodge has lately consisted of 46 ne- 
groes. A Masonic paper speaks of this 
as possibly the only regular lodge in 
America composed wholly of negroes. 
An organized group of churches in one 
State would not disfellowship a similar 
church organization in a distant State 
because one of its churches was com- 
posed of negroes. 



A Masonic organ published in Arkan- 
sas gives another paper a friendly no- 
tice, but says of its title: 

"The only suggestion we would make 
as to any improvement in the paper 
would be to change the word Compass to 
Compasses, and that is a small matter. 
We wish the Square and Compass a 
large degree of prosperity." 

Is there reason for this suggestion? 



The devil would like to make every 
one believe that the v/ork of the Holy 
Spirit in the hearts of men is fanaticism. 



Mtm of ®ur Pori 



We wish to call attention to the 
strong recommendation of Secretary 
Stoddard's work at the recent Friend's 
Yearly Meeting in Indiana,which is pub- 
lished herein. Mr. Stoddard spends this 
month in connection with the work in 
New York and especially with the con- 
vention to be held Oct. 25 and 26, and 
known as the New York-New Jersey 
convention. Next month, November, will 
be given to the western States that need 
him most. 



MICHIGAN STATE CONVENTION. 

The Michigan Christian Association is 
anticipating the best session it has held 
in recent years. 

The convention will be entertained in 
the United Brethren church, in Alma, on 
Oct. 6 and 7. Alma is a beautiful little 
city on the Pere Marquette and Toledo & 
Ann Arbor railroads. 

An excellent list of speakers has been 
secured. Rev. B. E. Bergesen of Chica- 
go and a member of the Board of Di- 
rectors of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, will be present throughout the 
sessions, aiid will deliver the principal 
address on Thursday evening. Other 
speakers engaged are Rev. John W. 
Brink, president of the Michigan Asso- 
ciation ; Rev. J. A. Watson, pastor Free 
Methodist church. Grand Rapids; Rev. 
A. B. Bowman, Alma; Rev. H. D. Che- 
ney, Owosso. 

There will be a report of the delegate 
to the National Christian Association an- 
nual meeting; reports of state officers 
and committees will also constitute a 
very interesting part of the convention. 

Liiportant conferences will be held, 
and it is hoped steps may be taken 
whereby a field worker may be secured. 
This meeting will afford a grand oppor- 
tunity to be blessed and to be made a 
blessing. Plan to be present. 

A. R. Merrill, Secretary. 



Many "a man seems to mistake Ma- 
sonic cant for truth that can be depend- 
ed on. 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



185 



SECRETARY STODDARD'S LETTER. 

riainfield, Indiana, September 17, igoQ. 

Dear Cynosure : I am here attend- 
ing the Western Yearly Meeting- of the 
Friends' church. There are about seven 
hundred representatives at this time in 
attendance. 

Your representative was given *^^'- 
of "the large tent" for half an hour, to 
present "our concern." The time was 
just after dinner, before the regular ses- 
sion of the meeting. Many were in 
committee service, but I judge that one 
hundred and fifty or more found their 
way to the anti-secrecy meeting. Some 
were there who knew my dear father 
and his work in this section thirty years 
and his work in this section thirty or 
more years ago. The church is not as 
free from lodge influence or lodgemen as 
it was then. I have had conversation 
with more than fifty of the leading 
Friends, and find they are usually not 
simply unconnected with the lodges, but 
more or less opposed to them. 

One minister says his most spiritual 
people say the reverse is true in their 
churches. The minister who made this 
statement showed the strain under which 
he labored ; worn almost to a shadow, 
there was a far distant look in his eye 
and I did not have to inquire whether 
he had been trying to tickle the lodge 
sinners to get a little support, but I did 
inquire if he was himself connected with 
the lodge. When he replied in the neg- 
ative, I said, "Thee does not then include 
thyself among the most spiritual in thy 
church ?" 

I find there are many concerns crowd- 
ing on the attention of this church. The 
evangelists have been working with good 
results, and cultured, consecrated mis- 
sionaries moved hearts and opened 
pocket-books, as they presented their 
mission. Here are only the choice spir- 
its, of course ; the lodg-e people and other 
sinners do not remain here in large num- 
bers. The atmosphere is not congenial. 
At least four seceding lodge members 
are among those who became subscrib- 
ers to the Cynosure. I trust they may 
bear faithful testimony. 

The tracts distributed at the close of 
the address were taken with eager haste. 



There is not much being said or done 
relative to the lodge by this meeting. The 
lodge seems to he getting a stronger foot- 
hold, but the spirit of light is here. Let 
us hope in the future there will be more 
light. 

The Cleona camp-meeting in which I 
was engaged at time of my report last 
month was a blessing to many. There 
was liberty for the anti-secrecy message. 
The pastor of the Menonite Brethren in 
Christ, Spring City, Pennsylvania, gath- 
ered a full house, with many looking in 
at the windows, to listen to the message. 
Lodge people expressed disapproval with 
anger, while friends contributed in sup- 
port. May the Lord bless this pastor 
and people for much kindness. 

Meetings in the Schwenkfelder, Toew- 
mensing church, and in the church 
of the Brethren, Landsdale, Pennsylva- 
nia, were well attended and helpful. 
Coming West I have held meetings in 
Mennonite churches at Springs, Penn- 
sylvania, and Casselman, Maryland. In 
the Mennonite Brethren in Christ's 
church, Phillipsburg, Ohio, and the 
church of the Brethren, \A'est ]\Iilton, 
Ohio. As the truth has been presented 
hearts have been stirred and expected re- 
sults fully realized. 

I desire in this connection to record 
my thanks to God for keeping me in 
health and strenthg. I hear of fevers, 
much sickness, and death. Every day 
I prove the falsity of the lodge state- 
ment, so common, "Join the lodge if 
you would have friends, when traveling." 
There can be no friendship equal to that 
from a fellow traveler to the better 
world. The tie that binds hearts in 
Christian love, beats all the ties the 
lodges ever invented. It lasts longer and 
goes further in the way of help. 

God willing, I shall spend Sabbath at 
Fairmount, Indiana. At the Indiana 
yearly meeting of Friends opening at 
Richmond, Indiana, September 22d, I 
hope for further opportunity to give 
anti-secrecy light. 

(^ur New York, Wnv Jersey conven- 
tion is invited to gather this year in 
New York City. I have written Presi- 
dent F. 'SI. Foster suggesting that the' 
dates be October 25th and 26th^ Cnless 



186 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



there is good reason for another date 
eastern friends may expect the call to 
gather in convention at that time. 

■Reports from meetings in the Free 
Methodist church, Columbus, Ohio, and 
the United- Presbyterian church, Mid- 
way, Pennsylvania, may be expected in 
my next. 

Ag'ain let us exhort to greater activ- 
ity. The harvest is before us. May 
all who read these lines be found among 
the reapers. The pay is large and sure. 
Thrust in the sickle and work. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



LIZZIE WOOD'S LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Arkansas, Sept. 14, 1909. 

Dear Brother Phillips : I visited the 
Central District Association on the 19th 
of last month, which was held at Sher- 
rell, Ark. All the preachers in this dis- 
trict have quit the lodge except five or 
six. In this district meeting they preach- 
-ed some povv-erful sermons against the 
lodges, whiskey and divorces. The 
lodge brother, and the brother that had 
rsecured a divorce and was living with 
wife No. 2, and the whiskey preacher 
that "holds with the hare and runs with 
the hounds," looked pretty serious dur- 
ing the sermons. 

On Saturday evening the greatest 
leader in religious work, both state and 
national, in this section came in when 
it was nearly time to take a recess until 
the night session. However, they intro- 
duced this great leader, who made some 
brief remarks, in which he admonished 
them to quit preaching annual sermons 
for the lodges, but he told them that he 
himiself was a lodge member. When he 
came out of the church after his short 
speech I met him on the grounds and 
said to him : 'T am sorry you told those 
brothers that you were a lodge man." 
He said: ''Yes, I belong to them in a 
business way, and I have been visiting 
the grand lodges trying to get them to 
take the annual sermon out and let the 
lodge be a business thing." I said : *''Yes, 
but how about those oaths — swearing to 
have your throat cut, your heart taken 
out, your body severed in twain?" He 
looked at me a little strange and said : 
■''Sister Wood, you have been up there." 



And laughed and passed on without an- 
other word. 

This great man has seen that these 
secret societies are sapping the life out 
of the church and he is trying to kill the 
snake while he himself is wrapped 
within the snake's coils. If 1 were he, I 
would break that cable tow and then kill 
the snake. So manV men have told me 
that if this great man quits a lodge or 
that great man, they themselves will 
quit at once. Now, you see what man- 
ner of men preachers ought to be. "Be 
thou an example." Tim. 4:12. 

Last week I was at Sterling, Ark., 
down on the line of this State and Louis- 
iana. It was a joint meeting of the 
Woman's Association and the Sunday 
School convention. I carried my 33 de- 
grees of Masonry yoti sent me and be- 
gan to show it to the preachers. You 
know they are so crazy about Masonry 
that if you let one man see the ritual 
he will tell all the rest of them. If 
there are a hundred they will all know 
it in ten minutes. 

Every morning I would get to the 
meeting early and get out my Bible and 
ritual of Masonry and sit right at the 
church door on the seat under the shade 
of the trees, and as soon as the first 
lodge man would get on the ground he 
would come and begin a conversation 
about secret societies. I would say: 
"Well, 'here is 33 degrees of Masonry 
and here is the Holy Bible ; we will see 
which is right now, God's Word or the 
devil's ritual." I have taken for the 
Scripture lesson the 13th chapter of 
Revelation, and would show him that 
their own Masonic beast had the same 
number as the old Catholic beast, as is 
related in verse 18, "Llere is wisdom. 
Let him that hath understanding count 
the number of the beast; for it is the 
number of a man ; and his number is six 
hundred three score and six." "Now, 
brother," I said, "this is your number. 
Verse 7 shows you that you are making 
war with the saints, just as the Papacy 
did ; verse 8 shows who of you will wor- 
ship this beast; verse 11 shows this 
beast has two horns like a lamb, but that 
he speaks as the devil or a dragon, like 
one of the brothers here who told me 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



187 



last night that the lodge is better than 
the church." Then he said: "But I 
don't go back on the church for my 
iodge.'' I said to him: "If yon do not 
do zvhat Christ tells you to do, yon have 
gone baek on the chureh. Paying your 
dues to the lodge will not pay your way 
to heaven. Jesus says, 1 am the way, 
the truth and the light; no man cometh 
to the Father but by me.' '' ''Wherefore 
come out from among them and be ye 
separate." 

Before I got through with the lesson, 
the preachers were standing around me 
three deep. 

These preachers are blind ; they want 
to do right, but the devil has got them 
lx)und. One brother said: "Sister 
Woods, we are so bound up by our oaths 
that if we knew that a brother is walk- 
ing disorderly in the church we can do 
nothing. He will say to us, 'You can't 
go back on me and turn me up to the 
church according to your obligation.' " 

I know this to be a fact, and every 
one of those preachers said "It is wrong, 
now we see it." 

God bless vou all, "Throw out the 
lifeline." The preacher is drowning, 
but those that can see the light are com- 
ing to it. Yours for Christ, 

Lizzie Woods. 

One of our earnest friends writes : "T 
am finding out more the real need of 
earnest, loving work among Christians 
who have been caught in the lodge trap. 
Yesterday at a funeral a Methodist Epis- 
copal minister told the people that 
when he joined the Masons they pointed 
him to the cross of Christ for comfort 
in sorrow, and when he joined the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America they also 
pointed him to Christ." This minister 
must be a member of Roosevelt's Ananias 
Club. 

THE FRIENDS' COMMENDATION. 

(Copy from Minutes of Indiana Yearly ^Meeting 
of Friends.) 

Plainfield, Indiana, September 19, 1909. 
To Indiana Yearly meeting of Friends: 
Brother W. B. Stoddard has very ac- 
ceptably attended our yearly meeting at 
Plainfield, Indiana. He has conducted 
himself in an exemplary manner and 
has been a blessing to us. Representing 
the National Christian Association, he 



addressed a large meeting, appointed for 
him by special announcement, on the 
subject of "Church and Secret Socie- 
ties," which was edifying and accepta- 
ble. I commend him to the courtesies o^ 
other Christian bodies. 

Lewis E. Stout. 
Superintendent Evangelistic W o r k. 
Western Yearly ]\Ieeting. 



INTERESTING LETTERS. 
From a Prominent M. E. Pastor. 

.^Detroit, I\Iich., April 17, 1909. 

Mr. Thomas Hitchcock, Temperance,. 
Mich. Dear Brother Hitchcock : I am 
returning your book on Freemasonry 
(j)y Finney) by this mail. I thank yott 
for its use. The book seems to be a 
fair treatment of the subject from the 
standpoint of what seems to be establish- 
ed data. 

Personally I do not believe in and 
have no connection with oath-bound or- 
ganizations of any sort, ^^'hatever ad- 
vantages may accrue to the individual 
froni such affiliations seem to me are 
more than offset by the imminent perils 
to per.sonal freedom of conscience, to in- 
tegrity of religious life and to that 
broad charity and universal affection 
which man o\yes to his fellow man. 

Neither I have any liking for the 
pomp and circumstance of such organiza- 
tions. Moreover, their title.^ and ritual- 
istic assumptions seem to me unworthy 
of sober thought and in large part lack- 
ing the sanctions of truth. However, 
many people have a great fancy for those 
very things and men in general do not 
stibject their acts to close and analytical 
scrutiny from the standpoint of Christian 
ethics and universal brotherhood. The 
average man likes show and assumption^ 
especially when it seems to promise hint 
present advantage and glorifies the crea- 
ture of his inventive genius. The simple 
life of faith and love has never been pop- 
ular with the masses of mankind and 
will i:ot be except as men are born of the 
Holy Spirit. Fraternally yours. 

C. W. Baldwin. 



Detroit. Mich., April 26, 1909. 
AFr. Thomas P. Hitchcock, \\'cst Toledo, 
Ohio. 
My Dear Brother Hitchcock: Yours 



188 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



of the 23d at hand. I am glad that the 
book reached you safely. I had gained 
the impression some way that your mail 
reached you via Temperance. 

In regard to the publication of my let- 
ter to you, I hardly think that it is 
worth publishing, although I have no 
serious objection to such a use of it if 
you desire to use it in that way ; its con- 
tents are simply my personal views on 
the matter. I have no personal knowl- 
edge of Freemasonry, nor indeed of any- 
other secret order, having never been ? 
member of any such society. Very sin- 
cerely yours, 

Charles W. Baldwin. 



SHALL WORK BEGIN FOR CHINA? 

Mt. Vernon, Iowa, September i, 1909. 
My Dear Brother Phillips: 

You will be glad to learn that two 
days ago Mr. Wong Gang Huo, a grad- 
uate of the Anglo-Chinese College at 
Foochow, arrived from China. He will 
pursue special studies here in Cornell 
College in order to prepare for more ef- 
ficient work among his own people when 
he returns to China at the end of four 
years. He will also help me part of the 
time in translating Christian books into 
Wen-li, the universal written language 
of the Chinese Empire. These books are 
to be published at Shanghai as fast as 
they are ready. 

I have already explained to you that 
this entire enterprise — including Mr. 
Wong's traveling expenses from China 
and back, his board, college fees, the 
publishing of the books, etc., is depend- 
ent upon the contributions of Christian 
people of all denominations who want to 
help extend the triumphs of the gospel 
in the "land of Sinim." Additional con- 
tributions are therefore solicited, and 
those who have subscribed for a series 
of years, but have not yet paid for 1909, 
are requested to remit to me as soon as 
practicable at Mt. Vernon, Iowa. All 
amounts will be receipted for and the 
account will be duly audited from time 
to time. All persons contributing at 
least $2.00 will also receive a photo of 
Mr. Wong and myself. 

The number of books translated and 
the size of the editions published will 



depend upon the amount of money that 
can be devoted to this important work. 
Hence it is unnecessary to urge the 
friends of Christian missions to help al' 
they can financially. 

I hope nothing will hinder or delay tlT- 
preparation, translation and publication 
of the book on Chinese secret societies 
concerning which we have conferred to- 
gether several times. Would it not be 
Vvcli for you to make ai. editorial ap- 
peal for money for this purpose? The 
money could be sent to you or to my- 
self. Yours for the salvation of China. 

W. C. Wilcox. 
Twenty-five Years a Missionary in 

China, Etc. 



EXPERIENCE OF AN EVANGELIST. 

Lundy, Missouri, Sept. i, 1909. 

Dear Sir and Brother : I have just re- 
turned from preaching for a month in 
St. Joseph, Champaign and I'earl, Illi- 
nois. What a time I had with the secret 
orders. They had almost got the church 
killed. Nearly all the preachers here 
have gone into the lodges. I only heard 
of one exception. It is a sad thing to 
see men that claim to be Christians go 
into such places. 

I met one preacher at St. Joseph who 
said that he went into Masonry so he 
could have more influence over them. 
Abraham had more influence over So- 
dom .by staying out of it than Lot did. 
''Yes, that is true," said he, '"but I tell 
them there is no salvation in the lodge." 
Yes, that is true, but there is plenty of 
damnation in the lodge. The only safe 
place for men and women is in the 
church. After I got him to confess some 
things on the lodges, I let him know I 
was going to expose the order business 
in that town. Then he began to urge 
me not to give them away. He said, 
"Brother Davis, I admire you for your 
courage, but do not give our signs away, 
the world will know them and that will 
do us harm." 

On August 15 I invited all the order 
members out to hear me. The pastor was 
there, too. I offered thirteen reasons 
why a Christian could not belong to the 
lodge. Ah, how mad some of them got. 
One big Mason rose and left the house 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



189 



in great haste. But I thought of the 
day ''When God shall judge the secrets 
of men by Jesus Christ." (Rom. 2:16.) 
The pastor twisted and turned and I 
looked for him to go, but he stayed. 
Afterwards he never called me brother. 
1 guess he had found out that he was no 
kin of mine. I seemed to have become 
his enemy because I had told him the 
truth. See Gal. 4:16. So I am having 
quite a tniie with the secret orders. But 
the truth is "marching on." 

I am your brotlier in faith, 

J. L. Davis, 
Evangelist. 



THE N. C. A. ANNUAL MEETING. 



Fullerton, California, Sept. 5, 1909. 
Mr. W. I. Phillips, 

Dear Sir : I made my first public talk 
on Free Masonry two weeks since. It 
was very well received and several said 
they had no idea that Masonry was so 
bad. I expect to keep up the work and 
speak publicly on the lodge wherever I 
have an opportunity. 

Yours truly, 

Amos Wright. 



IS IT CONSISTENT? 

If the public agrees that great lead- 
ers of thought in good morals and pub- 
lic policy, like Pres. Schuman, of Cor- 
nell, is right in saying ''Secret societies 
are detrimental to the good order and 
discipline of college students ;" and 
Pres. Eliot, of Harvard, in saying that 
"the Greek letter societies with their 
late hours and attendant revelries are 
not laying a good foundation for future 
manhood and an improved civilization," 
and Pres. Angell, of Michigan Univer- 
sity, in saying that "the college frater- 
nities place a barrier between the stu- 
dent and his superior — his teacher — 
which prevents a well 'balanced and 
wholesome mental and moral -growth," 
then how does it consistently follow that 
such fraternities are the proper thing 
for all others? Geo. Washington's fare- 
well address makes good reading for us 
about this time — a plea for open action 
without secret combinations. 

(Rev.) L. N. Stratton. 

The devil's big gun is turned on the 
Holiness Movement. 



A Paper Read by J. M. Hitchcock, Secre- 
tary of the Board of Directors. 

A synopsis of the work undertaken 
and accomplished by the National Chris- 
tian Association during the year 1908- 
1909 could be briefly and succinctly 
stated, but we cannot too frequently re- 
mind ourselves and our constitutents of 
the fundamental principles for which 
this organization stands. 

Like the man who became so en- 
grossed in the elaborate preparation for 
was done in the city of Boston — erudite 
Boston, if you please, so boastfully 
proud of its history and traditions, and 
even in Faneuil Hall, the cradle gf our 
American liberties. Were these men 
cowed and intimidated by such treat- 
ment? No, the hall was rented for the 
following evening with increased police 
protection,. and though tinder difficulties, 
the addresses were completed and vic- 
tory won. 

In more recent years we seldom hear 
of such outrageous persecution, but is it 
because the malignity of the enemy has 
-ajbated the tithe of a hair? No, but 
rather that we avoid the conditions 
which provoked the persecutions in Bos- 
ton. 

A few years since I called upon a 
well-known preacher of this city, a pas- 
tor of an anti-secret church, and asked 
him to deliver an address at our Annual 
Meeting. He very complacently and 
blandly replied, "While I do not believe 
in secret orders, I have learned a much 
better way than to oppose them. I preach 
the Gospel and lead to Christ and then 
they leave their lodges as rats flee from a 
burning ship." That man's name spelled 
in full is coward, and his great discovery 
did not have the merit of being original. 
The thought and even the phraseology 
had become so trite and hackneyed as to 
be almost meaningless. It is used by 
those too cowardly to confront and re- 
buke a popular evil whether it is in or 
out of the church. It is pious cant and 
cowardice to say, "jNIy business is to 
preach the Gospel and to lead men to 
Christ," when asked to give light on a 
popular evil that Christian men may be 
warned. I desire here and now in writ- 



190 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



ing to put myself on record as saying 
that the expression noted above is a most 
sacred truth closely associated with a 
most damnable heresy. A Christian 
3^oung man having confidence in his pas- 
tor, if told by him that an initiation into 
a Masonic lodge is as good as a prayer 
meeting, w^ould join the lodge with no 
more qualms of conscience than he 
would have in winding his watch. 

To be forewarned is to he forearmed. 
As judicio'us parents would safeguard 
the morals of their children by pointing 
out every possible pitfall, so it should be 
the duty of the Ohurdh and its ministry 
to educate and instruct the young people 
of their flocks as to the dangers lurking 
in these organized secret orders. 

At a representative gathering of the 
United Brethren (Radical) in national 
conference recently held at Huntington, 
Ind., it was resolved to adopt as a text 
book, "Modern Secret Societies," by 
President Blanchard, that students may 
go out prepared to meet the enemy. In 
contrast with this there is a Bible Train- 
ing School in Illinois, professedly op- 
posed to secrecy, and yet it gives no in- 
struction upon the character of secret or- 
ders and sends forth its students into the 
ministerial field as lambs to the slaught- 
er. The one school has the courage of 
its convictions ; the other the cowardice 
of an igndble slave. 

The Constitution and By-laws of the 
National Christian Association provides 
for the annual election of eleven directors 
for the transaction of its business. But 
it makes no provision for their compen- 
sation and evidently regards the office as 
a labor of love. The temptations of fat 
salaries and a large exchequer upon 
which to apply the modern arts of graft 
have been removed as far as the East is 
from the West. Thus it is that none 
aspire to the office and none accept it 
save those interested in the Cause. 

The Pu'biication Committee of the 
board reports the continued issue of its 
monthly Cynosure, which magazine is 
recognized as an up-to-date authority up- 
on the subject of secrecy. It has also is- 
sued the fifth edition during the year of 
Modern Secret Societies. This book is 
in demand by theological students. Its 



treatment of secret orders is regarded 
as standard. The committee has also is- 
sued a few new tracts as the exigencies 
seem to have required, as well as hav- 
ing published a new edition of the old, 
for which there is a good demand. 

President Blanchard has been an oc- 
casional contributor to the columns of 
the Cynosure since its commencement, 
forty-two years ago, but a regular 
monthly contributor for the past five 
years. These articles of his are such 
marvels of versatility and helpfulness 
that I recomj-nend that they be revised 
and published in book form. If they 
could be placed upon the market at a 
price so that all could afford them they 
would be indeed helpful to the Cause. 

I'he Building Committee has made the 
changes and repairs upon the Carpenter 
Building (our headquarters) which from 
time to time seem necessar}^ The prin- 
cipal improvement during the past year 
has been a new cement floor 25x75 in the 
basement. 

The Committee on Field Work has ex- 
ercised supervision over the agents and 
lecturers. 

The Finance Committee has kept in 
touch with the needs of the treasury and 
been in consultation with the Treasurer 
and has directed the placing of trust 
funds. Thus the work has been dis- 
tributed during the year among the 
eleven Directors. 

If some of our anti-secret friends have 
wearied and been disappointed because 
the end of our warfare tarries, it is be- 
cause they have under-estimated the 
strength and malignity of our foe. It 
should be remembered that the rebellion 
against our government was not put 
down by the 75,000 three-months' volun- 
teers. W^e have more encouraging 
omens of success than had our temper- 
ance friends ten years ago ; now the ad- 
vocates of the liquor traffic are not only 
on the defensive, but in a state of con- 
sternation. 

The day seems breaking for our 
Cause. Our enemies seem to see an 
inexplicable handwriting on the wall and 
are deeply concerned, as is manifest in 
various ways. Within the past twelve 
months a (bill knowin as the Gaines Bill, 
calculated to restrict the knowledge of 



October, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



191 



die laity concerning secret orders, was 
introduced into our National Congress. 
No sooner had it made its appearance 
than our. Board of Directors, always on 
the alert, entered protest in behalf of 
this Association. The bill was allowed 
to die in committee. 

The uneasiness of the lodge, because 
of our sale and distribution of their rit- 
uals, is shown in various ways. The dif- 
ferent lodges are securing copyrights for 
their secret rituals ; the legislature of 
Tennessee passed within the year a law 
giving a designated officer of the lodge 
the right to seize and confiscate an ex- 
posure of his lodge when found in pos- 
session of a non-member. 

An interesting matter on somewhat 
similar lines was the arrest within the 
year of a man in Indianapolis, Ind., for 
wearing a Masonic badge, he having 
been initiated in a clandestine lodge, so- 
called, but which he claimed to be as 
regular as any, and hence that he had 
a right to wear his badge. The court, 
however, fined him $50. Here in Chi- 
cago, recently, Sunday school superin- 
tendents and other men of standing were 
offered free initiation, providing they 
would accept and take advantage of this 
great privilege within a specified time. 

The most marked thing in the history 
of our country this year has been the 
triumphant assertion of the anti-frater- 
nity principles by school boards, teach- 
ers' associations and the courts before 
whom the question has come. It looks 
now as though the colleges and univer- 
sities were going to take it up. This 
discussion has had a very wide influence 
among many classes. A Representative 
in Congress told one of our Cynosure 
subscribers that he doubted whether the 
Gaines' Bill could pass even if it had 
been brought before the House. This 
Representative claimed not to stand 
aloi:e by any means among those who 
would oppose such a bill. 

But this is a fight that will not end 
imtil Satan shall have been bound. The 
fear of this impcrium in impcrio is 
upon the State and Church still, and 
doubtless will grow greater with the 
passing years. A week hasn't passed 
here ia Chicago since a man was killed 
for working without having the mark 



of the Union upon him. Wagons have 
been destroyed; harnesses have been cut 
and horses turned loose in the streets, 
and police have had to guard funeral 
processions of friends with their dead on 
their way to the cemetery — not in the dis- 
tant past, but now at this present time. 

Within the past thirty days it has been 
reported that Cornelius Shea in an east- 
ern city stabbed his paramour, possibly, 
fatalty. And who is Cornelius Shea? 
Why, none other than the leader who 
handled the Teamsters' Strike in this city 
a few years since and practically de- 
stroyed the commerce of the second city 
in the Union for long weeks. Business 
men, whether they belong to lodges or 
not, are beginning to trace these out- 
rages to their source, and they are de- 
termined they shall cease, secrecy or no 
secrecy. 

The faculties of our universities and 
colleges are composed of broad-minded 
men who are beginning to see that the 
public sentiment and the courts which 
condemn high school fraternities will 
soon place under the ban the Greek let- 
ter fraternities in schools of higher 
grade. 

The Governor of Kentucky is reported 
as pledging protection to citizens against 
the depredations of secret Night-riders, 
though it should cost his commonwealth 
a million dollars. 

It is wonderful how rapidly people ed- 
ucate when delivered from the thraldom 
of fear and encouraged by public senti- 
ment. 

The classic debates of Senator Doug- 
las and Mr. Lincoln, in 1858, on the 
slavery issue was the beginning of the 
end of American slavery. The signs of 
the times indicate the beginning of the 
end of the Secret Empire. 

Our weapons are not carnal but spir- 
itual. It is our mission to flood the peo- 
ple with the light of truth. All institu- 
tions which cannot bear the search-light 
of truth must sooner or later perish. 

It is with gratitude to God that we 
recognize an increasingly large number 
of journals, both religious and secular, 
Ihat are outspoken upon the subject of 
secrecy. Let us patiently wait, work 
and pray. In due season we shall reap 
if we faint not. 



192 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1909. 



ONE YEAR'S LODGE EXPERIENCE AND 
WHY I LEFT IT. 

One thing that worried me in my 
lodge experience was the class of men 
that were always in the majority. In 
entering the lodge room before the 
opening exercises there were always 
men sitting around smoking and chew- 
ing tobacco and telling their stories, 
which were not any too elevating. 

You could see some leading church 
members, even ministers, associating to- 
gether with that element. As I read in 
my Bible vv^here Christ said, "I am the 
light of the world; he that followeth Me 
shall not walk in darkness, but shall 
have the light of hfe." John 8:12. 
Then such passages as "Be ye not un- 
equally yoked together with unbelievers, 
for what fellowship hath righteousness 
with unrighteousness? and what com- 
munion hath light with darkness? And 
what concord hath Christ with Belial? 
or what part hath he that believeth with 
an infidel? And what agreement hath 
the temple of God with idols? for ye are 
the tempule of the living God, as God 
hath said, I will dwell in them, and walk 
in them; and I will be their God; and 
they shall be My people. Wherefore 
come out from among them, and be ye 
separate, saith the Lord, and touch not 
the unclean thing, and I will receive yon, 
and will be a Father unto you, and ye 
shall be My sons and daughters, saith 
the Lord Almighty." (2 Cor. 6:14-18.) 

I felt that I was not properly repre- 
senting Christ before those who knew 
Him not. I could but feel that I had 
formed alliances, and was in intimate as- 
sociation with unbelievers. I was im- 
pressed that I should "come out from 
among them," but how to do so was a 
hard question to solve. There were as- 
sociations and influences that I knew 
not iiovv to break away from. In time 
I seldom attended lodge, still I kept up 
my dues and my influence was in favor 
of the lodge system. In reading such 
texts as "For thou art an holy people 
unto the Lord thy God; the Lord thy 
God hath chosen thee to be a special 
people unto Himself, above all people 
that are upon the face of the earth. The 
Lord did not set His love upon you . . . 



because ye were more in number than 
any people ; for ye were the fewest of 
all people ; bui because the Lord loved 
you, and because He would keep the 
oath which He had sworn unto your 
fathers." (Deut. 7:6-8.) 

I was impressed that if I would be a 
true follower of the Lord I could not 
expect to follow the masses. I could not 
expect to have all men speak well of 
me, for so did their fathers to the false 
prophets. 

J wanted to get out of ihe lodge and 
yet I didn't seem to knov/ how to do so. 
In reading "Associate yourselves, O ye 
people, and ye shall be broken in pieces, 
and give ear, all ye of far countries; 
gird yourselves, and ye shall be broken 
in pieces. Take counsel together and it 
shall come to naught; speak the word, 
and it shall not stand, for God is with us. 
For the Lord spake thus to me with a 
strong hand, and instructed me that I 
should not walk in the way of this peo- 
ple, saying. Say ye not. A confederacy 
to all them to whom this people shall say. 
A confederacy ; neither fear ye their fear, 
nor be afraid. Sanctify the Lord of Hosts 
Himself, and let Him be vour fear, and 
let Him be your dread." (Isa. 8:9-13.) 

I felt I v/as in a confederacy that 
vvould surely be broken into pieces. If 
not under present conditions it would 
surely come when "the fruits that thy 
soul lusted after are departed from thee, 
and all things v\hich v/ere dainty and 
goodly are departed from thee, and thou 
shalt find them no more at all." (Rev. 

18:14.) 

For all that when I think of some 
leading members of the different 
churches that took a leading place in 
lodge work, even ministers, it was hard 
to understand how it could be that these 
good people were so deceived. After 
seme time had f}assed that I had not at- 
tended lodge one of the members spoke 
to me about a worthy brother that was 
having some trouble and said : "It 
Avould be well for all the members who 
could do so to attend the trial on a cer- 
tain da>'." 

Such things brought to mind pas- 
sages like the following: "And judg- 
ment is turned away backward, and jus- 



tice standeth afar off, for truth is fallen 
in the street, and equity cannot enter. 
Yea, truth faileth and he that departeth 
from evil maketh himself a prey; and 
the Lord saw it and it displeased Him 
that there was no judgment." (Isa. 

59-I4-I50 

I did not attend the court investiga- 



tion referred to, but I did begin in earn- 
est to study my Bible, and soon found 
evidence against the things done by 
lodge influence that I knew was not in 
harmony with its teachings. In my next 
I will speak of my final decision to leave 



the lodge. 



George O. 



States. 



STANDARD WORKS 



ON 



Secret Societies 



FOR SALE BY THE 



National Christian Association, 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago, 111. 



ON FREEMASONRY 

FBEIEMASONBY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Deesburg, Past 
Master of ^:s:iy Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
Institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
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pages, clotb, $1.00; paper cove^', 60 cents. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
oflicer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
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quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
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«loth, $1.00. 



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MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
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REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
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FRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
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A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
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OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGP^EES 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
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ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THE 

INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
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THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages ; 5 cents* 



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EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 

THE EVANGELIST 

A 138-degree Mason. 7 pages ; postpaid, 2 
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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

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CHICAGO, ILL. 





<^Or THE <^- 

Polar Might. 

Thou 5erv'6t 
A WAYMARK 



INSTEAD. 

When I am dead, forget me, dear, 

For I shall never know 
Though o'er my cold and lifeless hands 

Your burning tears should flow. 
I'll cancel with my living voice 

The debt you'll owe the dead — 
Give me the love you'd show me then, 

But give it now instead. 

And bring no wreaths to deck my grave, 

For I shall never care, 
Though all the flowers I loved the most 

Should grow and wither there. 
I'll sell my chance of all the flowers 

You'll lavish when I'm dead 
For one small bunch of violets now, 

So give me that instead. 

What saints we are when we are gone. 

But what's the use to me 
Of praises written on my tomb. 

For other eyes to see? 
One little word of praise, 

By lips we worship, said, 
Is worth a hundred epitaphs — 

Dear, say it now instead. 

And faults that now are hard to bear 

Oblivion then shall win; 
Our sins are soon forgiven us 

When we no more can sin; 
But any bitter thought of me — 

Keep it, for when I'm dead 
I shall not know — I shall not care — 

Forgive me now, Instead. 

— Selected. 



OaRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

♦ 

MMCE— 'Per year, in advance, $1.00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PBESENTATION COPIES — Many persons' subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Elntened as Seccmd-alass matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Post Office at Chicacro, Dl., under Ace of Mjirch 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Fraternal Insurance — Warning from "Na- 
tional Fraternal Congress" 194 

Call for Christian Workers' Conference. .194 

Christian Attitude Toward the Lodge 195 

A Cloud of Witnesses — President Blanch- 

ard ..196 

Inside Story of the Grange 200 

Secret Society Murderers 202 

Cut Rates in New Jersey 203 

A Methodical Madness 203 

The Unions Change Attitude 207 

The Burden of Proof 207 

News of Our Work 209 

New York-New Jersey Convention 209 

Anti-Secret Literature for Theological 

Seminaries 209 

The Michigan Convention 210 

Secretary Stoddard's Letter 211 

Lizzie Woods' Letter 212 

From Our Exchanges: 

The Lutheran Standard; the Free 
Methodist; The Christian Witness; 
The Waterford Magnet; The Gospel 
Messenger; The Mennonite; The 
Christian Statesman; Chicago Daily 
Tribune; The Springfield Republic- 
an; The Burning Bush; The Banner; 

John Bull; Words of Life 215-224 

D. L. Moody's Testimonies 217 

Are Freemasons Honest? 220 

The Rival Temples 224 

Chicago Relief Corps Items 224 



GOSPEL TEXT CALENDAR. 

This calendar is well known to almost all 
our readers, but if you have not seen a copy 
you should have one. The calendar contains an 
appropriate Bible text fqr each day in the year, 
printed on an open Bihle design. The > front 
pag-e. is printed in three colors, and the other 
pages are each prijited in three colors. 

At the lower end of each inside page is print- 
ed a calendar for the month in large figures and 
beautiful colors. Each inside page contains two 
Bible pictures besides the texts for each day. 
It is tinned at the top and suspended from a 
silk cord.. Agents make big money selling 
them. We want an agent in every city .^nd 
town in the United States and in Canada. Price 
of calendar, 25 cents each: sample r copy to 
agents, 15 cents. 

Send for a sample copy and for our prices to 
agents at once, and go to work. Address H, S. 
HALLMAN, 23 Queen Street North, Berlin, 
Ontario. " ' 

SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

MYSTIC SHRINE IliLX) STRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E.^ church, St, Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes: "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THl. 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By "Spectator," AUanta, Ga, 16 pages; 
6 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigious 
system, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion'?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
interesting. 30 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workingrs of 
Preemasonry," by Ex-President Charles Q. Finney, 
of Oberlin Coilese. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National ^Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

Its relation to civil government and the Chris- 
tian religion. By President J. Blanchard. The 
un-Christian, anti-republican and despotic char- 
acter of Freemasonry is proved from the highest 
Masonic authorities. 5 cents. 






"Jesus ansfvered him, — I spake openly to ine nurid; aud in secret iiave I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLII. 



CHICAGO, NOVEMBER 1909. 



NUMBER 7 



Few, if any, have more dnfiuence in 
our country to-day than the late Dwig'ht 
L. IMoody. This 'accounts for the in- 
quiry that reaches u's every Httle while 
for his testimony upon the Lodge. Such 
will the pleased to find it re-printed in 
this number of the Cynosure. 



The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago 
announces that its annual mid-winter 
Convention of Christian Workers will he 
held earlier than usual this year, to co- 
incide with the return of Messrs. Chap- 
man and Alexander and their party of 
evangelists and teachers from Australia 
who are to take part in the convention. 
The dates now contemplated are Decem- 
ber 2 to 5. 



lodges or clubs. ''The gambling squad" 
of the Chicago Detective Bureau made a 
raid on the headquarters of The Painters' 
Union, arresting nine men and seizing 
the mbney and card's. The j'udge decided 
"This lis a private organization and the 
men are entitled to ,piay cards." 

It will be hard to fight gambling or any 
other immiorality under such a ruling. 



There are some things in the North- 
pole controversy that justify one in won- 
dering whether Dr. Cook is a Ma- 
son or not, and suspecting that he 
knows more about Eskimo lodges than 
about lodges of Masons. Along with 
this question goes the guess that Peary 
is a Freemason. 



The story "Only Seventeen" in our 
September issue met with wiide accept- 
ance. A (pastor in CaHfornia is very de- 
sirous of seeing it in pamphlet form for 
wide diistribution among the young peo- 
ple of his denomination. Another sug- 
gested that it would be as important to 
have the fathers and mothers read it. 
One hundred 'dollars contributed for that 
object will secure its publication. 

In this number the lesson conveyed in 
our story "A Fraternal Foe," is no less 
imiportant. 



The Chicago Evening Post of Septem- 
ber 13th relates that Judge Beitler of 
Chicago ruled that gambling is O. K. in 



If one passes witho'Ut careful reading 
the editorial on "A Methodical Mad- 
ness," he does himself an injustice and 
possibly his young people an injury. If 
we had headed the article "Method in 
His Madness" perhap's it would have 
been better. The work of Pro»f. Vedder 
is being extensively advertised as a hand- 
book for Teacher-Training Institutes for 
use in Young People's Societies and by 
stUidents of churoh history generally. 
The author is Proffessor of Ohurch His- 
tory at Crozer Theological Seminary. A 
marked copy of this editorial ought to be 
sent to every Baptist student in college 
or Bible school. 



Five Hundred Dollars will give the 
millions in China a work in their own 
language that is need by them at the 
present time next to the Bible. No coiin- 
tr}' is more cursed wtih religious secret 
orders. Rev. Myron C Wilcox has 
served for a quarter of a century as a 
Miissionary in China. H-e is in sympathy 
with the National Christian Ass'ociation 
and its work. He has with him in this 
country Mr. Wong Gang Hiio, for the 
very purpose of assisting in the transla- 
tion of Christian literature into Chinese, 
the need for 'which is so pressing. 

Five Hundred Dollars will give the 
light on the lodge to millions. The book- 
lets or book will be sold by the various 
missionary agencies (not given away) at 



194 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



a price within the reach of the (people and 
the income wiill be devoted to publishing 
new editions, so that the Five Hundred 
Dollars bedomes an endowment for the 
perpetuation of this wfork. 

President Blanohard is on the advisory 
board that Rev. Mr. W'iloox !ha's organ- 
ized 'and his woirk is warmly endorsed 
by missionaries as well as others. Some 
may wish to address Rev. M. C. Wilcox 
for fuller informiation. Such informa- 
tion s'hould be sent to Lock Box 671, 
Mt. Vernon, Iowa. 



i| 



FRATERNAL INSURANCE. 

The Cynosure never gave a stronger 
warning against carrying on insurance 
on the principle of "brotherly love" in- 
stead of sound business principles than 
did the President of the National Fra- 
ternal Congress, which met in Boston 
this year. Professor Henderson says : 
"The majority of the members of the 
brotherhoods made themselves believe 
that the law of gravity, the multiplica- 
tion table and economic forces and laws 
may be successfully set at defiance, if 
only men love each other enough; and 
that such commonplace matters as tables 
of mortality and interest rates are appli- 
cable only to the insurance of rich men." 
From President "National Fraternal 
Congress." 

''On Dec. 31, 1906, there were 590 fra- 
ternal beneficiary societies in the United 
States and seventeen in Canada. These 
societies range from the highest degree 
of respectability to the worst kind of 
fakes. They had nearly 8,000,00 certifi- 
cates in force, with indemnity amounting 
to almost $9,000,000,000, and their re- 
ceipts in that year amounted to more 
than $18,000,000. This vast army of 
8,000,000 trusting, confiding members is 
marching to old age and to certain death ; 
the $9,000,000,000 of obligations are rap- 
idly reaching maturity. The societies 
that are operating on inadequate rates of 
assessment cannot possibly meet their ob- 
ligations if they continue upon their 
present basis, and as a consequence the 
time is not far distant when these socie- 
ties must go out of existence and their 
members deprived of promised protec- 
tion, and the fraternal beneficiary system 



condemned, as the building and loan as- 
sociations were a few years ago, unless 
some action is taken by the legislative 
bodies of this country requiring all of the 
societies to operate on a solvent basis. 
The National Fraternal Congress has 
pronounced in favor of adequate rates, 
and the societies connected with it stand 
for honesty, for solvency and for the ful- 
filment of promises made." 

CALL FOR A CHRISTIAN WORKERS' 
CONFERENCE. 

In form.er days D. L. Moody called his 
fellow Christian-wo'rkers together now 
and again for an inspiring conference; 
and since bis departure the Bible In- 
stitute he founded has followed bis ex- 
amvple. 

Its Mid-Winter Conference this year 
will be beld early to take ad'\^an'tage O'f the 
return from Australia of Messrs. Chap- 
man and Alexander and their associates, 
who will reach Chiaago (D. V.) Decem- 
ber 2nd, and take a prominent part in 
the exercises. 

It will commence on Thursdav even- 
ing, Dec. 2nd, in The Moody Church, 
corner of LaSaiie and West Chicago 
avenues, and continue through the fol- 
lowing Sunday, with three sessions each 
day. 

But we are not trusting in men or in 
progTams, but in the Living God. A 
noted Christian leader once prayed : 
"Lord, we t!hank Thee for bringing the 
speaker here ; now blot him o^ut, and let 
us hear only Thee." 

The great revival in 1857 was one of 
prayer. There was no preaching. At 
noi'on and at nig^bt churches, and some- 
times theaters, were filled with people en- 
gaged wholly in prayer. 

Forget The Moody Bible Institute, 
and Chapman and Alexander, and all the 
rest of the human planning if yoiu will. 
Let God thrust them all aside, O, that 
He would ! anid pour O'Ut a blessing upon 
us that there may not be room enough to 
receive ! 

Pray for us if you cannot come to the 
Conference. But if yoiu can come, the 
Insitute will try to take care of you. 

Fraternally and expectantly yo'urs, 
Henry P. Crowell, Pres. 
James M. Gray, Dean. 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



195 



€0ttti:tbuti0tt0» 



CHRISTIAN ATTITUDE TOWARD THE 
LODGE. 

By Rev. J. M. Foster, Boston. 
The command of the Apostle Paul con- 
cerning all social evils covers the case 
of the lodge system. **Have no fellow- 
ship with the unfruitful works of dark- 
ness, but rather reprove them : For it is 
a shame to speak of those things that are 
done of them in secret." 

1. Tpie lodge is unfruitful. Paul 
distinguishes between ''fruit" and 
"works." ''The works of the flesh are 
manifest which are these, fornication, de- 
ceit," etc. "But the fruit of the Spirit is 
love, joy, peace," etc. It is true a corrupt 
tree bears bad fruit, but it is barren of 
good fruit. The lodge does much harm. 
It does nobody good. "The unfruitful 
works of darkness" is the only out- 
come. 

I. The zvorks of the lodge are un- 
fruitful because they are secret. Christ, 
the kingdom of heaven, truth, God's peo- 
ple, are light. Satan, the kingdom of 
evil, the children of disobedience, the 
bottomless pit, are darkness. The secret 
lodge system is a division of Satan's em- 
pire. Christ said: "In secret have I 
said nothing. I ever spake openly." But 
the lodge members are sworn "to ever 
conceal and never reveal" the sayings 
and doings of secret empire, and that 
oath accompanied with the most shock- 
ing implications. 

2. Because they are temporary. The 
evil effect of the lodge will remain with 
their blinded victims forever. But they 
are an ungodly system destined to de- 
struction. They claim to transfer their 
menibers in death "to the grand lodge 
above." But that is a delusion and a 
snare, and like all the other of Satan's 
lies, deceives those who listen to it. 
"Every plant which my heavenly Father 
hath not planted shall be rooted up." 
So it has been with Pagan Rome. So 
with slavery; so it will be with Papacy 
and tlic secret lodge system. The briars 
and thorns and bundles of tares are all 
to be burned. 

3. Because they do not satisfy. They 



have degrees and honors, all of which 
must be paid for, and the higher the 
aspirant goes the more money he must 
irive. But there is no satisfaction. Their 
product does not nourish. They are only 
what the canker is to the rose or the 
gall to the oak leaf. They are salt water 
to the thirsty man. They are apples of 
Sodom to the hungry man. 

4. Because they hai'e no correspond- 
ence with the man. The man soaked in 
whiskey, clothed in filthy garments, his 
hands stained with the blood of murder, 
his tongue thick with blasphemy, his ca- 
pacities for what is noble and pure and 
good and true is no correspondence be- 
tween the man and the things he chooses. 
So there is no correspondence between 
the folly and childish display, the horrid 
oaths and imprecations, and the diaboli- 
cal obligations taken, and the man who 
was created in the image of God, and 
meant for companionship with God and 
heavenly spirits. 

II. God's people are forbidden to 

FELLOWSHIP the LODGE. 

"Have no fellowshp with the unfruit- 
ful works of darkness." "The works of 
darkness" seem to be personified as if 
they were companions of those who do 
them. In that view the prohibition is, 
Have nothing to do with the evil works 
which it is possible for a man to do by 
himself. One man cannot form a lodge. 
He may practice wicked works alone in 
secret — and that is forbidden. But the 
word here used is wider. It means do 
not join Vv'ith other people in doing the 
unfruitful works of darkness, which it 
takes more than one to do! And what 
covers the lodge? Popular social evils 
that root and become strong, because so 
manv professing Christians strike hands 
with them. The slave system never 
w^ould have become powerful if God's 
people had refused to have anything to 
do with it. So of the drink system. And 
the .^ecrct lodge system has become an 
octopus, in which 11,000,000 of our fel- 
low citizens are taken, beause God's peo- 
ple have fellowshippcd it. And I am 
profoundly convinced that one great rea- 
son whv the gospel is despised by so 
many and the church regarded with ill- 
concealed contempt, is to be found in the 



'i^ 



196 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



11 



fact that Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights 
of Pythias, Elks, Eagles, are found in 
the pulpits and pews and at the com- 
munion tables, and in the conferences 
and synods of almost all the reformed 
churches. "Be not unequally yoked to- 
gether with unbelievers : for what fel- 
lowship hath righteousness with unright- 
eousness? and what communion hath 
light with darkness? And what concord 
hath Christ with Belial ? or what part hath 
he that believeth with an infidel? And 
what agreement hath the temple of God 
with idols? for we are the temple of 
the living God ; as God hath said, I will 
dwell in them, and walk in them; and I 
will be their God, and they shall be my 
people. Wherefore come out from 
among them, and be ye separate, saith 
the Lord, and touch not the unclean 
thing; and I will receive you, and will 
be a Father unto you, and ye shall by my 
sons and daughters, saith the Lord Al- 
mig^hty.'' 

HI. God's people are to protest 
AGAINST THE LODGE. ''But rather rep rovc 
them." It is not enough to shine in the 
darkness. We m.ust lift up our voices in 
protest. The word ''reprove" means to 
''convict." It is the word used by our 
Lord. The Holy Spirit "shall convict 
[reprove] the world of sin," etc. The 
churches have generally joined in a con- 
spiracy of silence as to the lodge, in- 
stead of crying aloud and sparing not. 
The reasons assigned for this protest 
against the lodges are cogent. 

1. Because the evils are so vile and 
repelling. "For it is a shame even to 
speak of those things that are done of 
them in secret." The world says, "Do 
not expose them. It is improper, indeli- 
cate, indecent." But that is the very 
reason why God's people are enjoined to 
protest. The government insists on pub- 
licity for corporations and trusts, as a 
cure for their evils. Protestants should 
demand that the doors of monasteries 
and convents be open for government 
inspection ; and also that every secret 
lodge room be open to public view. 
"There is nothing secret that shall not be 
revealed." 

2. Because the salvation of the lodge 
men is involved. "But all things that 
are reproved are made manifest by the 



light." The purpose of testimony against 
the lodge is evangelistic. The salvation 
of the members should be aimed at. It 
is a word of help to the witness. "Be 
courageous ; your witnessing will be 
fruitful. The wallis of Jericho will fall 
and many a Rahab's house saved." 

3. Because it makes converts: "For 
everything that is made manifest is 
light." Converted lodge men are the 
most effective witnesses, as President 
Finney. 

4. Because the salvation of the 
church demands her organic separation 
from the lodge. "Wherefore He saith, 
Awake thou that sleepeth, and arise 
from the dead, and Christ shall shine on 
thee." It is our persuasion that the 
church should separate from her com- 
munion by discipline, every lodge mem- 
ber. A congregation of fifty members, 
filled with the Spirit, and purged from 
lodge members, is stronger than a con- 
gregaton of 10,000, whose men are in 
the lodge and give the time and energy 
and money that belongs to the church to 
that Satanic order. God can use the weak 
church. Satan does use the great world- 
ly church. "Arise from the dead." 



A CLOUD OF WITNESSES. 

By President Blanchard. 
In looking over some old letters the 
other day, I chanced on one from my old 
friend. Rev. S. Bristol. He died a little 
while ago, after living out a long life in 
the service of our Lord Jesus Christ. He 
was in every way a remarkable man. He 
was a preacher and an evangelist of 
power and never hesitated to take his 
stand on the side of truth because it was 
unpopular. There was nothing of the 
time-iserver or coward in his constitu- 
tion. Speaking on the subject of lodg- 
ism, he said : "Secret societies never had 
any charms for me. I was naturally too 
open, frank, fearless to favor them. I 
remember well when a boy the contempt 
it aroused in me to hear some silly girl 
say : 'I know something you don't know.' 
I felt much like replying : 'So do I know 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



197 



something you don't know, and that is 
that you are a fool.' 

"Once when grown up my zeal for 
temperance led me to join a 'Good Temp- 
lar Lodge.' When initiated and the 
farce gone through, I was so disgusted 
and ashamed that I seized the first op- 
portunity to relieve my mind. I told the 
order how utterly nonsensical and useless 
the whole system of secrecy was ; that 
there was nothing to keep secret in our 
legitimate temperance work ; that to pre- 
tend that there was was a falsehood, that 
all the good we had should come abroad 
and 'be proclaimed on the housetops. So 
I left them and spoke openly the best 
truth I knew, fearing none but God. 

"For eig'hty years I have coursed my 
way among secret societies. I have 
never seen any good come of them, but 
much evil. I have a neighbor nearly as 
old as I 'am. He was born in Connecticut, 
as I was. He was converted and joined 
the church near the same time. Alas ! he 
joined the Freemasons, and straightway 
degenerated, said that the lodge w^as 
good enough church for hiin, ceased to 
attend religious meetings, ceased family 
worship and left off all religious work. 
He now totters on the 'brink of a double 
death, temporal and eternal ! Alas ! 
while there are many such, I never knew 
one in these eighty years who was bene- 
fited." 

This dear man had nothing of the 
coward about him and I am moved to 
give you his testimony, a voice from the 
celestial country. In the same collection 
of letters, I found one from some man 
who had been disturbed by our testi- 
mony against the lodges and wrote me a 
letter on the subject. It is quite short 
and I give it to you that you may note 
the difference in the tone and spirit of 
the two letters. This friend says: 

"In regard to secret societies being un- 
christian, will say that I have heard 



thorns crack under a pot before. To 
make a long story short, you had better 
go to some doctor and have your brains 
taken out and replace the contents with 
mud, so that you would have some sense, 
otherwise you are blind." Of late years 
I do not receive many communications of 
this sort ; in earlier years they were more 
common. The spirit of the orders is, 
however, the same, as one can easily see 
from the looks and words of lodgemen 
when the subject is under discussion. 
The worshipper at Cain's altar always 
has the spirit of Cain in his heart. 



College Fraternities. 

It is interesting to note that there is 
some progress in the discussion concern- 
insf secret societies in schools. For a 
year or two we have been told from 
every quarter that these lodges in the 
higfh schools are extremely evil, but those 
who have said this often add in an apol- 
oe:etic tone that of course the same sort 
of societies in colleges are all right. It 
really seems that the presidents and pro- 
fessors in our schools for higher educa- 
tion are becoming more intelligent or 
more courageous. On every side we are 
hearing from these men whose positions 
and opportunities for gaining informa- 
tion make their testimony weighty. 

The American Educatioiiol Rc^iczc 
quotes President Schurman of Cornell, 
as follows : "Fraternity men do not study 
enough. If fraternities are to prosper in 
the universities you must find some way 
of s:ettinof more work done ; the intcl- 
lectual life must be quickened. . . . 
It is not easy for men to work when 
their main purpose is to live in fine 
houses, to have a good time and to give 
what is left to the professors. . . . 
The percentage of men forced to leave 
college each year is larger in the frater- 
nities than outside. Now and then you 
hear of a house not merelv desolated but 



198 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



even emptied." President Northrup, of 
Minnesota, agrees with the opinion of 
President Schurman and Director Chit- 
tenden of the Sheffield Scientific School 
makes the statement that ''the interests 
of fraternities and scholarship are antag- 
onistic.'' 

Dr. John P. D. John, formerly presi- 
dent of De Pauw University, says that 
college fraternities are wrong and should 
not be allowed in any school. The West- 
ern State Normal School of Michigan, 
the Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechani- 
cal College and Wittenberg College all 
are quoted in this article in the Review 
as decidedly hostile to secret orders in 
colleges. 

High School Orders. 

There is a new development in the 
high school secret societies. They now 
have an organ. At least one of them 
has. The Gamma Eta Camma is the 
name of a well printed monthly devoted 
to the interests of the high school lodge 
of that name. A recent number was 
sent me by the "Grand" Secretary, as 
he is called. The letters which I have 
received from him are extremely sad and 
interesting. They reveal a young man, 
earnest, enthusiastic, and honest, but al- 
most totally destitute of religious and 
moral sense. It is hard to see how this 
young man would change his life if he 
were to hear to-morrow that God was 
dead. 

The paper is of the same temper. It 
tells of dinners which the members had 
when they went to their grand meeting, 
of the dances which they enjoyed, and 
of similar pleasures which they expect 
in time to come. But of enthusiasm for 
God or humanity there is not a trace in 
the entire publication. When we remem- 
ber what young men free from the cor- 
rupting influence of lodges Live been 
and done for the church and the world 
we can only wonder what would be the 



situation if any considerable number of 
ouryoungm.en and women should become 
infected with this virus. It is certain 
that the great steps in human progress 
'have not been guided by such persons as 
these reveal themselves to be. 

It is also hopeful to note that a full 
survey of the field shows no lessening in 
the opposition to these high school orders 
on the part of thoughtful teachers and 
Boards of Education. The National 
Teachers' Association at its last meeting 
passed unanimously a resolution con- 
demning the public school lodge. The 
number of the American Educational Re- 

m 

view from which I have quoted so freely 
above on college orders is just as out- 
spoken on the lesser lodges which are in 
some respects the greater danger. There 
is nothing new said. There needs noth- 
ing new be said. The eflect on charac- 
ter which has been uniformly evil is the 
sufficient reason for the opposition of 
these teachers. California, Ohio, Michi- 
gan, Illinois and Indiana have legislated 
against the fraternities and in almost 
every great city the same sort of action 
has been taken. This is not because the 
teachers or directors of schools are prej- 
udiced against secrecy. On the contrary 
many of these people are members of 
one or more lodges. But the social, edu- 
cational and moral evils have been so , 
many that the whole teaching profession 
is practically unanimous against it. 
Young Law Breakers. 
In the paper or magazine of the high 
school we find here and there questions 
as to what they are to do iii these states 
where the orders are forbidden by law. 
The language is carefully selected and 
more is hinted than said outright. 
Throughout the whole, however, there 
runs a tone like this : We have to obey 
the law now, at least we must pretend 
to obey it, but if we can we will in 
some way evade or defy it. That this 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



199 



is the natural effect of secrecy on men, 
all students know ; that this tendency 
will operate more strong-ly in the young 
than in those who are older goes without 
saving. 

Fraternal Jury Fixers. 

In this connection an important fact 
recorded in the daily press may be men- 
tioned. At this time a movement is on 
foot in Chicago to learn who has been 
fixing juries so as to exempt the wealthy 
and the vicious from the operation of 
law. Several times in this evening's pa- 
per it is said that, one cog in this wheel 
was a certain fraternal order. That is 
quite understandable. Secret orders are 
adapted if not designed for just such 
work. But why does not this report tell 
us which order it is which has been at- 
tempting to fix juries in Chicago so that 
justice cannot be done? Do these sworn 
officials who are professing to ferret out 
crimes against the jury box belong to 
this very order which is known to be 
involved in this kind of work? And if 
all we know is that some secret order 
has been arranging juries for the benefit 
of its members how are we to know 
what the arrangement is, what the order 
is, and how we are to change matters 
so that what is just and rig'ht may be 
done? 

Still farther, if one secret society can 
fix juries why cannot other secret orders 
do the same? And if one lodge can keep 
this sort of thing up for years before it 
is discovered, how long will it probably 
take to ferret out the same sort of work 
which is being done by five, ten or twenty 
other ''fraternal orders?" Other ques- 
tions arise. In case the officials repre- 
senting the government are members of 
the same lodges that the jury "fixers" 
belong to, what reason is there to think 
that justice is to be done? Why should 
a man belong to a secret order for years, 



attend its dances, pay the dues, and fetch 
and carry for its officers, if he is not 
to be protected when he is in trouble? 
The fact is that these men do expect 
to 'be helped by public officials. At times 
they may be disappointed, but they have 
a perfect right to expect help and when 
they can arrange it secretly they get it. 

How can the public be deceived about 
such transactions? Nothing is easier. 
Let the lodge witness tell the truth. Let 
the judge charge the jury correctly. Let 
the prisoner be sentenced for his crime 
and then let a second trial and a third 
be arranged and at last when the patience 
of the public is exhausted and the 
witnesses are scattered, let the lodge man 
go free, and w'ho is to tell how the thing 
has been done? Case after case of this 
kind will he at once suggested to the 
mind of any one who has followed the 
course of courts. This is part of the 
explanation of the vast number of judges 
required in American courts. For years 
there has been a continual crv for more 
judges and larger salaries. Yet in Eng- 
land with forty millions of people, there 
are about as many judges as we have in 
Illinois with about five. No doubt there 
are a number of factors in the case, but 
it is no doubt true that the fraternal or- 
ders which help to bribe jurors do other 
things of the same sort and that all 
these combine to make more judges need- 
ful. 

What Shall the End Be? 

It is hard to forecast. All that we can 
surely say on such a subject is that in 
the end righteousness will certainly tri- 
umph. But what forces God will em- 
ploy to accomplish His purposes no one 
can affirm. Who could have told how 
American slavery was to die even five 
years before its end came? Who would 
have said five years ago that we should 
see as nuich progress made in the tern- 



In 



iii 



200 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



perance cause as God has already given 
us? At this time Sabbath breaking is 
almost universal and the lodges have a 
vast power. All this amounts to nothing 
when our heavenly Father girds on His 
sword for hattle. His word ''runneth 
very swiftly" and in a moment evils 
which have grown through centuries top- 
ple to their final fall. 

We do not need to be anxious about 
the event; we should be careful not to 
fail of our own duty. This is my only 
desire for myself. In these days it seems 
to become more and more clear that the 
kingdom of heaven is at hand and that 
there is a blessing for all who are found 
watching when the King comes. God is 
not puzzled to find out ways to accom- 
plish His plans and to overthrow His 
enemies. When He touches the hills 
they smoke. I have seen them smoke 
often. The proud, self-willed sons of 
evil boasting of their shame and defying 
the armies of Israel yet in a moment 
going down to death like Belshazzar in 
the hour when he feared no harm ! 

''Blessed is that man whom his Lord 
when He cometh shall find watching." 
God grant that each one who reads these 
words may be of that happy company. 
— Wheaton College. 



PLEDGE REQUIRED IN DENVER. 

"I pledge on my word of honor that 
I am not a member of a fraternity, soror- 
ity, or other similar organization, and 
that if at any time in the past I have been 
connected with such organization I have 
severed such connection. I understand 
that my membership in the high school 
is an honorable pledge to obedience to all 
the rules established by the board of edu- 
cation." 



The Famous Engraving, "Daniel-in- 
the-Lidns'-Den, 20x30 inches, is offered 
to our old and new subscribers, as a 
splendid premium. Address THE LIFE- 
LINE, Mooers, Clinton Co., N. Y. 



A FRATERNAL FOE. 

Inside Story o f the Grang-e. ■ 

Pastor Harron obviously failed to en- 
joy the meetings of the Grange. Yet 
during the period in which he hesitated 
to join, he had often been assured that 
he was losing a great deal of pleasure, 
as well as profit, by waiting. Within a 
week of his arrival he was invited to an 
open Grange meeting, in which the Mas- 
ter took him by surprise when he intro- 
duced him publicly as a new member, 
soon to be initiated, whose aid and influ- 
ence would be highly valued. It was 
noticed that while his brief responsive 
remarks lacked nothing of the courtesy 
due from a guest, he made no allusion 
to joining and expressed no opinion of 
the order. 

The officer who introduced him, 
though not a member of the church, was 
yet the treasurer of the ecclesiastical so- 
ciety; his wife, however, was a mem- 
ber unsurpassed as a promoter of fairs 
and festivals, and a helper in suppers, 
entertainments, and all sorts of social 
gatherings. At the table, later in the 
evening, she tried to accomplish what 
her husband had not succeeded in doing 
as completely as she hoped; but Mr. 
Harron still adroitly evaded a full re- 
ply, when she innocently asked a ques- 
tion about the date of the meeting in 
which he would be initiated. 

"Of course your wife would like to 
join at the same time," continued Mrs. 
Clarkson ; "but she would not wish you 
to wait until she could leave the baby, 
evenings, and lose all the meetings your- 
self till then." 

"I don't think I could set any time this 
evening," said Mr. Harron, in a way that 
seemed to drop the subject for that time. 

Permanently dropped it was not by 
any means ; so important an acquisition 
to the membership was not lightly to be 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



201 



forfeited. So persistent was the cam- 
paign that at length he rehictantly yield- 
ed, like the girl who marries a man to 
get rid of him. He was hardly more 
than initiated before he heartily wished 
himself divorced from Flora, Ceres, and 
all the rest. 

''I tell you," he said confidentially to 
a pastor in a neighboring town, '*a pas- 
tor cannot afiford many evenings in each 
month for cheap shows." 

"Isn't it on the wdiole a good thing, 
though ?" the other asked quickly. "Some 
of my people urge me to join as a matter 
. of duty. They declare that I would cer- 
tainly enjoy it and find it a great iielp 
to my work in various ways." 

"Well, tastes differ; I was often told 
so by people whom I find enjoying them- 
selves when I am terribly bored." 

"What is it like— or can't you tell ?" 

"O yes, I can tell. Do you remember 
the little pork song? Have you hap- 
pened to hear it anywhere?" 

"The one that has all sorts of little 
grunts and squeals?" 

"Yes, that's the one." 

"I heard a little shaver give it in a 
concert ; a bright little fellow he was, 
and he made it a cute trifle, good for 
variety." 

"For variety, it is ; but the Grange 
gives you that kind of spicing for regu- 
lar diet, till you are sick and tired. It 
is all just — pork." 

Disgust at a tediously monotonous 
effort to extort a laugh, was by no 
means the only or the chief thing tc> 
alienate a man like Mr. Harron. He also 
felt that the good he was told he could 
do in the Grange was lacking, wliile 
power to do good in the church seemed 
waning. He could neither attend witli 
these feelings oppressing him, nor avoid 
attending in consequence of them, with- 
out exciting hostility. Remembering jiis 
reluctance to join, some of the more m- 



L 



fatuated members, noticing that he was 
now loth to attend, were stirred to bitter 
resentment. None were more incensed 
than the Grange Master and his .vife. 
That the pastor should not only mir.s 
regular meetings so often, but even 
slight a Grange social, when he well knew 
that not fire nor flood could keep Mrs. 
Clarkson from a church social, was out- 
rageous. It did not enter into account 
that she and her husband invariably es- 
chewed prayer meetings, while they omit- 
ted more Sun'day mornings than he did 
Grange evenings. 

At first came hints; then queries; 
afterward serious expostulations shad- 
ing into reproaches; and, finally, threat- 
ening and vindictive intimations. As he 
nevertheless continued contumacious, ap- 
pearing to care as little for the Grange 
as the treasurer did for the church, that 
official began to resort to other meas- 
ures. For a beginning, he fraternally de- 
layed monthly installments of the salarv 
ten days longer than usual. \\'hen this 
failed of the desired effect, he resorted 
to paying only part of what was due, al- 
lowing an arrearage to accumulate. 
Then he began to dole out the remainder 
in uncertain sums, and at irregular in- 
tervals wdiich sometimes extended sev- 
eral weeks. Finally, he suspended even 
partial payment for so long a time, that 
for five consecutive weeks the pastor's 
family saw on the table nothinir but 
bread, with asparagus from the garden, 
and milk for which a parishioner who 
was not a Granger allowed him to run 
in debt. Bv such means, the Grange 
I^.Iaster illustrated fraternity, and the 
church treasurer observance of dutv. 

Grange members, one by one, as if 
detailed in selected order, discontinued 
church attendance; weekly collections 
diminished; frequent remarks about the 
unpopularity of the minister efficientlv 
aided in making him unpopular. Of 



202 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



course he was finally driven away, and 
the Grangers rejoiced at his going wheth- 
er the angels did or not. 

One graduation evening Mr. Clark- 
son stole unnoticed into a seat hidden 
by a pillar in a church fifty miles from 
home. He could see his former pastor 
on the platform with the other members 
of the school committee. The pastor's 
son was among the seniors, about to re- 
ceive his high school diploma. In six 
years, the little boy who went to school 
imperfectly fed, through Mr. Clarkson's 
fault, had grown into an athlete well 
able to hold his own on play ground or 
in class room. One thought accounted 
for the shadow that occasionally passed 
over the happy father's face. Though 
the son had every right to a liberal edu- 
cation that diligent use of marked tal- 
ent could claim, the father lacked means 
to provide it for him. Yet gratefully re- 
calling the past and rejoicing in present 
comfort, the earthly father committed 
the son, now as always, to the providen- 
tial care of the Heavenly Father. 

When the exercises closed and friends 
were crowding the platform to greet 
the new alumni, Mr. Clarkson appeared 
with them, and from no one did the 
young man receive a warmer welcome. 
Presently taking his former pastor a lit- 
tle aside he said with emotion: 'T sup- 
pose you have not heard that in the re- 
vival now going on in your old parish, I 
have been converted from a Grange Mas- 
ter to a church servant. Jesus Christ 
is Master now. For His sake I want to 
provide for your son's collegiate and pro- 
fessional education. And I ask your for- 
giveness for wrong confessed too late." 

It would in no case have been in the 
pastor's heart to be unforgiving; it could 
not be in the father's heart to interdict 
opening wider doors into life for his 
son. Fraternity such as the secret ritual 
failed to produce had come. Formal fra- 
ternalism had given place to real broth- 
erhood. 



tMtorial 



Miss Hinman's article dn the O'ctober 
number met with strong commendation. 
A pastor writes : 'T am glad tO' learn 
this about Miss Wil'lard. Having read 
this arti cale cnitically (Miss Hiinman's) 
yet with irrepressible enthusiasm. I in- 
cline to regard it as one oi the most 
creditable recent additions to our litera- 
ture." 

A leading Christian worker in Chicago 
writes : "Why not secure Miss Hinman 
for the lecture platform? I believe she 
would do as well as the best in present- 
ing o'ur reform tO' the public. Her article 
is strong, anid none the less so for its 
frequent quotations." 



SECRET SOCIETY MURDERERS. 

Pacing their cells and crying piteously, 
Chinam.en spending their last day in 
prison • and soon to go to their death, 
■broke down under the solemn conse- 
quences of secret society membership. 
For several years there had been in Bos- 
ton a secret society — ^or in Chinese 
speech, a Tong — called the On Leong 
tong. Merchants and other substantial 
members of the Chinese community of 
Boston — '"topside Chinamen" — were its 
members. Hep Sing tong is a rival so- 
ciety supposed to have been organized 
by Warry Charles, an educated China- 
man writing good English and capable 
of acting as court interpreter. Laundry- 
men and laborers composed the Hep Sing 
tong. The government alleged that 
Warry Charles organized a band of nine 
"hatchet men" or professional murder- 
ers, to make war on the other tong, and 
that on the night of August i, 1907, he 
sent them to kill as many of the On 
Leong tong as they could. 

"After the longest trial of a capital case 
on record in Suffolk count}^, which last- 
ed more than five weeks, cost upward of 
$40,000, 'and was marked by the sum- 
moning of eighty witnesses by the gov- 
ernm.ent and forty by" the defense, an 
unprecedented total of nine jury verdicts 
of first degree murder was handed in by 
a panel in the Superior Court." 

Is not one lesson of this terrible case 



Noyember, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



203 



to avoid joining any organized conspir- 
acy? ''My son, if sinners entice thee 
consent thou not." 

"And these lay wait for their own 
blood ; they lurk privily for their own 
lives." "Have no fellowship with the un- 
fruitful works of darkness." "What 
fellowship have righteousness and iniq- 
uitv?" 



CUT RATES IN NEW JERSEY. 

Darius Wilson and his son James, 
driven out of Massachusetts Bay terri- 
tory by Masonic monopolists, and fleeing 
to the mosquito sv/amps of New Jersey 
with their Eg3q3tian rite, have met trouble 
there. "A's if a man did Ree from a 
lion, and a bear met him, cr went into 
the house and leaned his hand on the 
wall and a serpent bit him." Each has 
been held in $i coo bail for the grand 
jury on the charge of obtaining nioney 
under false pretenses. Morris Besser 
made the complaint, allegin^^- that these 
two ^Masons represented themselves as 
having been sent out by the grand lodge 
to initiate candidates who were not able 
to pay so large a fee as the usual one. 
The accused, however, claim innocence 
of intent to deceive, and say that they 
have been organizing lodges of the An- 
cient Egyptian Rite. Erom what is al- 
ready known about Dr. Wilson, has been 
shown in a New England court, and pub- 
lished in the newspapers, it is altogether 
probable that what he claims is true, so 
far as having organized so-called Egypt- 
ian Rite lodges is concerned; but what 
the two Masons may have happened to 
say to Besser is of course the point in 
issue. The -court may be able to deter- 
mine without great difficulty whether, in 
this particuh.r instance, the Wilsons 
made a statement inconsistent with their 
general work and representations. Pos- 
sil)ly the question what they have said 
or done about Blue Lodge degrees in 
New England will come into the exami- 

I nation of this new case. We are remind- 
ed of wdiat Rev. James P. Stoddard 
wrote when Rom?n Catholics contended 
against the great Masonic demonstration 
made in laving a corner-stone or two for 
the City of Lowell, and asked for a civil 
cercmonv instead, because the buildings 
were erected by the city. Said Brother 



Stoddard: "Let the potsherds of the 
earth strive with the potsherds of the 
earth." Let the Wilsons and the Bessers 
play Kilkenney cats and so call attention 
to Masonrv and its variations. 



A METHODICAL MADNESS. 

It is so many years since we saw the 
Life of Edward Bright, which was 
written by Henry C. Vedder, that exact 
statement or precise quotation cannot be 
unreservedly claimed. With this reser- 
vation, we speak of the book as we rec- 
ollect it. Its author was editorially asso- 
ciated with Dr. Bright in the office of 
the New York Examiner in former 
years, but is now Professor of Ecclesias- 
tical History in Crozer Theological Sem- 
inary. He is author of important and 
excellent books of religious history. 

Dr. Bright, whose biographer he nat- 
urally became, held relations with the 
Baptist churches of the state of New 
York which made his own history to a 
great degree that of the denomination. 
One chapter is entitled The Anti- 
Masonic Craze ; and since the state of 
New York was peculiarly involved, while 
its Baptist churches were deeply affected, 
Dr. Bright's life included peculiar rela- 
tion to the period treated in this chap- 
ter. The biographer is true to his office 
in giving Dr. Bright's final opinion of 
the course pursued in a period calhng 
loudly for wisdom of speech and action 
in the churches. For himself, he dis- 
claims knowledge of the question by 
Vv'hich the minds of men were disturbed, 
though he does admit that once he 
bought a vapid and uninteresting pre- 
tended exposure of Masonry at a news- 
stand. He seems to assume that those 
who from 'the outside judged Masonry 
were the only anti-Masons, and that 
their judgment could not have been 
founded on facts, for he declares that 
No one not a ]\Iason can tell, and no 
Mason will tell what is within the order. 
He still further appears to take sides 
in a controversy he confesses he does not 
understand by stigmatizing the inter- 
est of the churches as a Craze. 

This word does not occur casually or 
obscurely in a sentence ; it is selected for 
a chapter heading. It signifies nothing, 



204 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1901^. 



i:f 



unless something without reason ; a man 
crazed has lost his reason ; he is pos- 
sessed by lunacy, or by something that 
produces similar effects ; passion or prej- 
udice might appear in a chapter depicting 
a craze, but not the manifestation of rea- 
son. 

Whether a student of history thinks 
he finds in the anti-Masonic movement 
anything unreasoning or not, he ought 
at least to concede that the churches of 
New York contained many members 
in full sympathy with the opponents 
of the Masonic system, who were far 
from thoughtless about any important 
affair, and were most unlikely to be 
swept away by senseless excitement. Be- 
sides these, there were many outside 
Baptist churches who represented the, 
most solid and substantial elements of 
the commonwealth ; too settled to be set 
adrift, too well trained to think or act 
wildly. While not all eminent, they in- 
cluded many sharing the personal quali- 
ties of distinguished men who disapprov- 
ed Masonry, and spoke no uncertain con- 
demnation. To name a very few whom 
the chapter heading might seem to stig- 
matize, is to empty the word of mean- 
ing. No one would use it in speaking 
of one of the strongest Anti-Masonic 
authors, John Quincy Adams, lawyer, 
legislator, diplomat, and executive, whose 
range of service, including variety, im- 
portance, and duration, has hardly been 
matched in United States history. Those 
two notable secretaries of State, Daniel 
Webster and William H. Seward, were 
not madmen, and Chief Justice Marshall 
was not apt to speak without reason. 
Such men and those associated with 
them, are not natural victims of a craze. 

However, we are not left to this ap- 
peal to personality, for the literature cf 
that period, at once and more than suffi- 
ciently, refutes the imputation of wild 
unreason. Voluntarily, Masons set forth 
facts on the basis of which opinions 
were formed ; involuntarily, some Ma- 
sons, still striving to adhere to the sys- 
tem, gave testimony under oath which 
was the more effective if possible, be- 
cause emphasized by their reluctance. At 
the same time so much was written, and 
with so great manifestation of thought- 



fulness, that to use the word craze, in 
a chapter heading, appears itself almost 
like a freak of madness. 

The oracular declaration that what no 
one else can tell, no Mason will, is a 
historic statement that history itself 
pointedly disproves. Masons without 
number would say freely that the secrets 
have been told ; in fact, a share of 
the business done at our office is selling 
exposures to Masons who need them 
for lodge use. If anything in the world 
justifies the paradoxical designation, 
Open secret, it is a pretended secret of. 
Freemasonry. The question whether 
, Masons have detested, denounced, and 
exposed Freemasonry, was abundantly 
answered long ago; the question still to 
be asked, if this book has not conclusively 
answered it, is whether a student and 
writer of history can venture to write so 
judicially without studying more ex- 
haustively. 

The same subject reappears in the 
same author's valuable Short History 
of the Baptists. The chapter in which 
it now occurs has the general title, The 
Days of Controversy. We are fortu- 
nately able to quote directly and literally 
from the book, which says : 

"No controversy was more disastrous to 
the Baptist churches of the Middle States 
than the anti-Masonic struggle between the 
years 1826 and 1840. One William Morgan, 
a Mason, who had published a book purport- 
ing to expose the secrets of the order, sud- 
denly disappeared in 1826, and was believed 
to have been foully dealt with. A body was 
discovered and identified as his, though the 
identification has always been regarded as 
doubtful. Excitement against the Masons, 
and secret fraternities generally, rose high, 
until the dispute became a political issue in 
state and even national elections, and the 
churches took the matter up. In a large 
number of Baptist churches the majority 
opposed secret fraternities, declaring them 
to be unscriptural and dangerous to the 
peace and liberties of the Commonwealth. 
In many cases the minority were disfellow- 
shipped, and not a few floundering churches 
were crippled, or even extinguished, while 
the growth of all was much retarded. The 
lessons of that period liave taught American 
Baptists to be chary of interfering through 
church discipline with questions not strictly 
religious, and to beware of attempting to 



i 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



205 



settle, by an authoritative rule, questions of 
conduct which it is the right and duty of 
each Christian man to decide for himself. 
Thus, while, at the present time the major- 
ity of Baptists strongly favor total absti- 
nence as a rule of personal conduct, and 
prohibition as a practical policy, in very 
few churches is either made a test of fel- 
lowship." 

Like Claudius Lysias who ordered 
Paul bound with two chains because the 
Jews were beating !hini and trying to 
kill him, and ordered him scourged be- 
cause the Jews made a clamor, our his- 
torian pillories anti-Masonry because 
Masonry made havoc of churches. That 
Masonic author in whose writing, fol- 
lowed hy his murder, the historic epi- 
sode began, is slightingly introduced as 
— one William Morgan. The whole his- 
tory is handled as an excitement stirred 
up by a supposed murder, the finding of 
a not well identified body being the im- 
perfect evidence that any murder had 
been committed and that the man had 
not merely disappeared. The ill-war- 
ranted excitement ran so high as to 
overflow into politics. It even crippled 
or destroyed churches, though the ques- 
tion involved was not strictly religious. 
Such is historv "as she is wrote" for the 
edification of Baptists, the derived les- 
son being not to meddle with what is not 
religious — istrictly. 

Another writer who was contempo- 
rary with these churches during that 
very period, was in several ways pecu- 
liarly qualified to give a true history of 
what is treated in the ''History of the 
Baptists," by Professor Vedder. As a 
young lawyer, Charles G. Finney had 
been a thoroughly well versed Free- 
mason, but as a Christian he afterward 
found Masonry no longer serviceable to 
him. 

'Having, then, been already a lawyer 
and a Freemason, he became also one 
of the most eminent and successful evan- 
gelists this country ever produced, be- 
sides being a pastor, a college president, 
and an author. A text-book of 'system- 
atic theology was one of the works 
that came from his pen. Beyond ques- 
tion President Finney is a first class 
authority on that passage in American 



church history concerning which we 
have quoted from Professor Vedder. He 
finds something more than a craze among 
people living in his time; something 
more than excitement about a murder. 
For instance, he says : *Tn consequence 
of the publication of Morgan's book, 
and the revelations that were made in re- 
gard to the kidnaping and murder- 
ing of Mr. Morgan, great numbers of 
Masons were led to consider the subject 
more fully than they had done; and the 
conscientious among them almost univer- 
sally renounced Masonry altogether. I 
believe that about two thousand lodges 
as a consequence of these revelations 
were suspended." 

To illustrate one feature of what is 
stigmatized by the other writer as a 
craze, we pause upon another passage: 
''Conventions were called of Masons that 
were disposed to renounce it. . . . 
The men composing these conventions 
made public confession of their relation 
to the institution and publicly renounced 
it. At one of these large conventions, 
they appointed a committee to superin- 
tend the publication of Masonry in all 
its degrees. This committee was com- 
posed of men of first-rate character, and 
men quite generally known to the pub- 
lic. Elder Bernard, a Baptist elder in 
good standing, was one of this commit- 
tee; and he, with the assistance of his 
brethren who had been appointed to 
this work, obtained an accuate version 
of some forty-eight degrees. . . . In 
this work, any person who is disposed 
may get a very correct view of what 
Freemasonry really is." 

Professor Vedder charges the oppo- 
sition to Masonry with injuring and 
sometimes destroying Baptist churches; 
of these churches President Finney says : 

"Before the publishing of Morgan's 
book the Baptist denomination, especially 
in that part of the country, had been 
greatly carried away by Freemasonry. 
A large proportion of its eldership and 
membership were Freemasons. A con- 
siderable number of ministers and mem- 
bers of other branches of the Christian 
church had also fallen into the snare. 
The murder of William Morgan and the 
publication of Masonry consequent there- 



206 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



upon, in the books I have named, broke 
upon the churches — fast asleep on this 
subject — Hke a clap of thunder from a 
clear sky. The facts were such, the reve- 
lations were so clear, that the Baptist 
denomination backed down, and took the 
lead in renouncing and denouncing the 
institution. Their elders and associated 
churches, almost universally, passed reso- 
lutions disfellow'shiping adhering Ma- 
sons. The denomination to a consider- 
able extent took the same course. 
Throughout the Northern states at that 
time I believe it was almost universally 
conceded that persistent Freemasons, 
who continued to adhere and co-operate 
with them, ought not to be admitted to 
Christian churches. 

"Now it is wo'rthy of all consideration 
and remembrance, that God set the seal 
of His approbation upon the action ta- 
ken by those churches at that time, by 
pouring out His Spirit upon them. Great 
revivals immediately followed over that 
whole region. The discussion of the sub- 
ject, and the action of the churches, took 
place in 1827, '8, and '9, and in 1830 the 
greatest revival spread over this region 
that had ever been known in this or any 
other country. They knew Masonry, as 
we know it, by an examination of those 
books in which it had been revealed." 

Knowing facts by the study of au- 
thentic books, is not going crazy with 
excitement because a dead body has been 
found. The after effects in decaying or 
wrecked churches, do not appear in the 
report of the contemporary evangelist. 

Tremont Temple, Boston, was one of 
the churches which treated Freemasonry 
as anti-Christian and refused fellowship 
to persistent adherents of the false and 
wicked system. Its pastor. Dr. Colver, 
was himself a Mason whose eyes were 
opened, and in a personal letter to an- 
other Mason he spoke of "the time when 
all the secrets of Masonry were publish- 
ed in the state of New York, and Masons 
were everywhere denying the disclos- 
ures." He said, moreover, 'T suffered 
very much at that time in my spiritual 
feelings ; I felt that though silent I was 
indorsing deception and lying, and yet 
my oaths bound me from frankness and 
truth. I did not suffer more when un- 



der conviction for sin, than I did in 
that terrible state." 

Reading one morning at family pray- 
ers about the more than forty Jews who 
bound themselves not to eat or drink 
until they had killed Paul, he found his 
Masonic fetters struck off; it was the 
duty of the conspirators, not to execute 
their pledge but to repent of It. He 
decided that "any oaths that contravened 
the law of God were a matter of repent- 
ance and abandonment." He says, "I 
got free from the snare with repentance 
and brokenness of heart — but oh ! I thank 
God I am out." 

"I am free to say that It is my deliber- 
ate opinion, that the vicious character of 
Masonry and Its guilt concealing and 
barbarous oaths, are such as not only to 
release all from their bonds but also to 
lay upon them the solemn obligation to 
tear off its covering and expose Its enor- 
mity. I regard it as Satan's masterpiece, 
a terrible snare to men." 

This eminent member of the denom- 
ination whose history is In question, 
seems to have no doubt that a Mason 
has told or would tell the truth about 
Masonry. A Mason himself, he differs 
from Dr. Bright's non-Masonic biogra- 
pher at this point. He obviously differs 
again from the Baptist historian in re- 
garding the question as strictly religious. 
Dr. Colver spoke from inside and con- 
temporary knowledge, when he said: 
"Many good men are Masons, and 
strangely blind to Its enormities; but it 
is a power in the hands of bad men, 
unsurpassed for mischief." More than 
half a century earlier Washington had 
declared that Masonry could be used for 
the "worst of purposes." 

From eminent divines like Finney and 
Colver, we turn to statesmen, conversant 
with the political history to which the 
historian alludes. Demonstration is a 
word that keeps strange company with 
Craze, yet no less a master of language 
than John Quincy Adams says : "I am 
prepared to complete the demonstration 
iDcfore God and man, that the Masonic 
oaths, obligations, and penalties, cannot 
by any possibility be reconciled to the 
laws of morality, of Christianity,* or of 
the land." Obviously, he found the Ma- 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



207 



sonic question strictly religious ; and ex- 
President Adams was a first authority on 
what is compatible with the laws of the 
land. 

The kind of man to be swept away by 
a craze does not become United States 
Attorney General, like William Wirt, 
who called Freemasonry a ''Wicked con- 
spiracy ag-ainst God and man." If we 
adopt this great lawyer's opinion, we 
must credit the Anti-Masons of 1830 with 
(being strictly religious in their dealing 
with a conspiracy against God. 



THE UNIONS CHANGE ATTITUDE. 

The American Federation of Labor 
has ceased to be hostile to technical edu- 
cation in the public schools, and is said 
to have taken steps to co-operate with 
public instruction. This favors those 
children who cannot pursue scholarship 
far, hut must leave school early in order 
tO' join the industrial forces of the coun- 
try. Technical instruction works direct- 
ly in their favor, and it is to the credit 
of the American Federation that it has 
at length either recognized the value of 
this part of public educational service, or 
yielded to the evidence of obvious futil- 
ity in resistance to the irresistible tend- 
ency of the times. 

It is only about a quarter of a century 
since Dr. Charles T. Warner, who was 
a teacher in a public school of Spring- 
field, Mass., persuaded the school board 
to let him start technical instruction in 
the high school grade. The new tech- 
nical high school had few pupils at first, 
perhaps partly for the reason that those 
for whom such instruction Avould then 
have seemed particularly designed were 
the very pupils who were not so apt as 
others to go beyond the grades below the 
high school. NoW; however, the classi- 
cal high school of Springfield has fewer 
pupils than the Technical High School, 
which has an enrolment of thirteen hun- 
dred. 

This tendency is like that shown in 
the educational institutions grading 
above high schools. The university has 
its technical plants as well as its labora- 
tory; even so, it does not catch the 
stream that sets toward the technical in- 
stitute of colleo:iate e^ade turninsf out en- 



gineers with the degree of B. S. ; if, 
therefore, a similar tendency appears 
one degree earlier in the course, it shows 
the tendency in earlier, yet approximately 
identical manifestation. One result may 
be better and more direct preparation 
for this higher technical course. In any 
case the American Federation of Labor 
has proved that the trade union is not 
incapable of learning the lesson taught 
by this manifestation of the spirit of 
the times. It has ceased to resist indus- 
trial education. 

Of course the change may be in part 
due to the desire of the Roman Catholic 
church to promote that limitation of pub- 
lic education which will incidentally re- 
sult because pupils who, otherwise, would 
attend the classical school, instead of 
turning at the end of the grade course 
to manual work and technical study, 
will thus limit that part of their educa- 
tion which the Catholic Church would 
gladly abbreviate. Besides this, the pa- 
rochial school could probably send its 
pupils to a w^orking school at less dis- 
advantage, and with less obvious expos- 
ure of the deficiency of parochial instruc- 
tion. i\t present the pupil coming from 
parochial preparation must march in the 
rear rank of the higher public school 
when he enters there; but in the new 
kind of school he may sometimes be able 
to hold a place in the front rank. This 
w^ould appear to weaken one argument 
against misappropriating funds in the in- 
terest of sectarian schools, the argument 
based on inadequate education in such 
schools. The heirarchy may have hoped 
that manual training would obscure this 
fault, and so weaken opposition to deliv- 
ering public funds up to priestly graft- 



ing. 



THE BURDEN OF PROOF. 

It is a principle of court practise that 
the burden of proof rests on the affirma- 
tive side of the case in issue, lie who 
seeks to brinqf action must show wliat 
I'.e has to bring*, if he can prove his 
claini it will be conceded, but if the de- 
fendant can show that the proot is 
i-mpty the claim is denied. In cii'^inai 
courts this thrown the burden o:j>roof 
en the State; none need prove himself 



II 



■fi 



208 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



innocent, so Icn.g- c'S the State fails to 
prove him guilt;/. The principle which 
makes this court rule just and v/ise ap- 
plies to the discussion of religious, moral 
ana political nriesdons. As in court 
practise, the hurden of proof still rests 
on the side taking position; if its claim 
is not supported it need not be refuted. 
To disprove v^^hat no one has tried to 
prove is like denying what no one has 
airrrmed. 

In order to apply the principle cor- 
rectly, it is necessary to discern on which 
side of a controvers}^ the real claim is 
made, or to distinguish which of two 
contestants is the aggressor or challenger. 
Ill-founded presumptions of this kind 
may yet be plausible. Whatley says : "It is 
a point of great importance, to decide in 
each case at the outset, in. your own 
mind, and clearly point out to the hearer 
as occasion may serve, on which side the 
presumption lies, and to which belongs 
the (onus probandi), burden of proof. 
For, though it may often be expedient to 
bring forward more proofs than can 
fairly be demanded of you, it is always 
desirable, when this is the case, that it 
should be known, and that the strength 
of the cause should be judged according- 

Speaking of the presumption as indi- 
cating the place of the burden of proof, 
he says : ''According to the most correct 
use of the term, a presumption in favor 
■of any suppo'sition means, not (as has 
sometimes been erroneously imagined) a 
preponderance of probability in its favor, 
but such a preoccupation of the ground 
as implies that it must stand good till 
some sufficient reason is adduced against 
it; in short, that the burden of proof lies 
on the side of him who would dispute 
it." 

The simple truth seem's to be that the 
burden of proof is assumed in making an 
assertion. It is not obviously true, or if 
not credited, it needs proof. It is to be 
noticed that the affirmative side is taken 
by him who raises the dispute by making 
the disputed assertion, or who is respon- 
sible for the existence of the cause in 
issue or for its being now considered. 
As in court cases, so also in others, an 
objector need not offer opposite proof 
so long as he can empty proofs that are 



cited. He need not go afield for reasons 
of his own, if he can nullify his antagon- 
ist's reasons, for balance of proof is need- 
less where one can use mere disproof. 
The assertion that two and two make 
five would not need to be met by proving 
that they make four, for it would be 
enough to demand pairs of two amount- 
ing to five. It is easy to see where the 
burden of proof rests in such a case, and 
this case involves the whole principle. 

Yet all cases may not be found so 
simple. The logical trap is misplacing 
the negative and affirmative sides of a 
discussion. An inexperienced debater is 
liable to confusion analogous to that of 
an inexperienced bookkeeper who is puz- 
zled to decide quickly on which side of 
an account an entry belongs, though the 
old bookkeeper beside him never hesi- 
tates to "debit what costs the concern 
value ; credit what produces the concern 
value." Sometimes the burden of proof 
may rest on the party which first acts, 
not on the one who first speaks. For in- 
stance, a case of trespass begins in the 
act, not in the owner's protest; the in- 
truder must show that he is within his 
rights or he is liable to indictment. If 
the owner brings the case to court, he be- 
comes the one who must show cause for 
his complaint. The new case is based on 
the trespass, yet it is a new one and the 
men have changed sides so far as proof 
is now concerned. In the field, the bur- 
den of proof was assumed by an act; in 
fhe court, hy a word. 

The anti-isecert lecturer deals with a 
disputant who hides ; hence he may some- 
times appear to be the one who must 
prove his case. What is the true place 
of such a speaker, or of a writer? At 
first, the question looks easy; Masons 
would surely say that the aggressor is, 
of course, the person attacking Masonry. 
He himself would be liable to take the 
same view and think that he had put the 
order on the defensive. Yet as the tres- 
passer and the proprietor change sides 
when the case comes to court, and find 
the burden shifted, so the Mason and 
anti-Mason change places, according to 
their attitude toward the position Ma- 
sonry itself holds in relation to govern- 
ment, morals, or religion. 

Granting Masonry to be a fixed insti- 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



209 



tution exeroising from time immemorial, 
an opponent of the order appears to bring 
a novel accusation which he must try to 
prove, and he obviously assumes that 
burden. The assumption, however, does 
not include a full account of the case ; it 
is the court case again ; it does not see 
the original trespass. Going back from 
the complaint to the thing complained of, 
we find Freemasonry an abusive and per- 
sistent trespasser, and here the burden 
shift's to the other side. Freemasonry 
claims a place it cannot justly hold; 
claims the right to take undue possession 
of initiates ; claims lawless control of citi- 
zens of the state ; inculcates preverted 
morals ; enforces subjection to a religious 
cult; lays violent hands on the three 
branches of republican government ; and, 
in fact, carries its trespassing far into the 
very heart of the territory. For its own 
existence and character it meanwhile 
trumpets the loudest claims. 

As armies contend, so Masonry and 
the State contend ; so Masonry and re- 
ligion contend. The order fights estab- 
lished government, eternal moral princi- 
ples, and the religion of that Word 
which was from the beginning. Innova- 
tor, trespasser, and arrogant claimant. 
Masonry 'boldly shoulders the burden of 
proof. Yet, confronted and challenged, 
it cowers back into the darkness of its 
secret den. Still maintaining its usual 
tone of bombast, it calls its refusal to 
meet the challenge, a ''Dignified Silence." 

Since Ma'sonry i-s such an unscrupu- 
lous trespasser, there rests upon it the 
burden of vindicating its aggression and 
proving its claim to possession. 

P)ecause Masonry is loud in self lau- 
dation, there rests on it the burden of 
proof that it possesses the merits which 
it proclaims. 

While Christianity is assaulted, morals 
are crushed, and government is raided, 
no burden of proof rests on Christianity, 
on ethics, or on government ; a heavy one 
rests on their arrogant foe. To action 
he has added speech, and speech is con- 
formed to action in qualities to name 
which would sound severe. The burden 
of proof is on the aggressive boaster, and 
it is a crushing burden. 



Mtm of ®ur Pori 



NEW YORK=NEW JERSEY CONVEN- 
TION 

Will meet in the Third Reformed Pres- 
byterian church, 23d street, between 7th 
and 8th avenues, New York, Tuesday, 
October 26, 1909. 

Morning Session. 

Devotional, Rev. J. A. Ward, Ex-Odd 
Fellow leader ; welcome. Rev. F. M. Fos- 
ter, Ph. D. ; response. Rev. J. A. Wester- 
velt, pastor Third Christian Reformed 
church, Paterson, N. J. Appointment of 
committees. Testimony, ''My Lodge Ex- 
perience," Rev. R. H. Shaw, evangelist. 
Address, ''Secrecy the W^eakness of La- 
bor Unions," Rev. J. M. Coleman, pastor 
R. P. church, Mercer, Pa. 

Afternoon Session. 

Prayer and Scripture reading. Rev. J. 
C. Slater, Brooklyn, N. Y. Address, 
"Lodge Salvation versus Christ's Salva- 
tion," Rev. James Parker, Ph. D., pas- 
tor U. P. church, Jersey City, N. J. Res- 
olutions discussed and adopted, Rev. E. 
M. Sandys, pastor Free Methodist 
church, Brooklyn, N. Y., chairman of 
committee. Other committees report. 
Question box and general discussion. 
Evening Session. 

Prayer and Scripture reading. Ad- 
dress, "The Separated Life and the 
Lodge," Mr. V. T. Jeffrey, Secretary 
Christian and Missionary Alliance. 
"Praise to God in Singing," 100 Psalm 
L. M., the congregation. Address, "The 
Reverential Spirit and the Lodge." Rev. 
W. B. Stoddard, Eastern Secretuiy Na- 
tional Christian Association. Collection. 
Address, "The Unregenerate i\Ian and 
the Lodge," Rev. Louis Meyer, Mission- 
ary Lecturer on behalf of the Jews. 



ANTI=SECRET LITERATURE. 
For Theological Seminaries. 

Through the generous contribution of 
a friend in the West we have been, for 
the past two years, enabled to present 
to the senior students in several theolo^- 
ical schools copies of President Blan- 
chard's "Modern Secret Societies," or 



210 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



President Finney's ''The Character and 
Claims of Freemasonry." 

It would be difficult to conceive of any 
other two volumes, so convincing as 
these two books, each carefully prepared 
by a president of one of our American 
colleges. 

Again it would be difficult to conceive 
of another class of men so likely to be 
benefited by such literature as those 
young men upon the threshold of their 
ministry. 

The National Christian Association is 
desirous of placing one of these volumes 
in the hands of every student graduating 
from any and all of our theological 
schools. 

Personally I know of few places where 
an investment is likely to meet with so 
speedy a return as in providing students 
with these volumes. Any contributions 
for this purpose may be addressed to 
W. I. Phillips, Editor Cynosure, 850 W. 
Madison street, Chicago. 

Most cordially yours, 

J. M. Hitchcock, 

Sec'y. Board of Directors, N. C. A. 



THE MICHIGAN STATE CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is an affiliation of 
the National Christian Association, which 
has done so much for the exposing of 
the secret society. What the National 
Association endeavors to do for the 
whole, every State Association would 
effect for the State, viz., in every honor- 
able way oppose the lodge. The State 
organization has, if possible, a State 
lecturer and agent in the field, dis- 
tributes literature, discussing the secret 
society question in its many bearings, 
and the convening of annual conferences 
in different parts of the State. 
. This year the Michigan Association 
met in convention at Alma, Mich. This 
burg is situated on the P. M. R. R. about 
78 miles northeast from Grand Rapids. 
It impressed us as a lively town, pleas- 
ant to live in. It has quite a number of 
churches, a Presbyterian College and a 
large, fully equipped sanitarium, without 
patients at the present time. And Alma 
also has lodges. The secret evil is some- 
what popular with world and church 



alike. That is the larger and more in- 
fluential churches, such as the Presby- 
terian and Baptist, favor this, one of the 
chief instruments of Satan in his oppo- 
sition to the Church of Jesus Christ. 
They do not know that they are hurting 
the Lord's cause by so doing, and virtu- 
ally putting a halter around their throats, 
a halter which will in due time strangle 
them unless they get rid of it. 

The convention met in the church of 
the United Brethren, one of the churches 
faithful unto the Lord in this matter. 
The United Brethren discipline every" 
member who belongs in any manner at 
all to a secret society. So we do not 
stand alone in our attitude. Nay, there 
are many churches in this country, and 
their number is growing, who allow none 
of their mem'bers to be affihated with a 
lodge. An example that may well make 
the other churches ashamed. Especially 
should the churches holding to the Re- 
formed faith and church government 
hang their head in shame, where they 
will not or dare not take a decided stand 
for Christ against the lodge. 

Five sessions were held at which many 
prayers, earnest and believing, were of- 
fered, speeches and addresses delivered. 
"The Lodge," "Why I Oppose the 
Lodge," "Is the Religion of the Lodge 
the Religion of the Bible?" and kindred 
subjects were presented. The attend- 
ance was small. None of the larger 
churches participated. How could they ? 
Strong resolutions were taken de- 
nouncing the lodge, commending the 
faithful churches and the National Chris- 
tian Association, and renewing the en- 
gagement to continue the fight in faith 
and trust in Jesus Christ. 

Officers for the ensuing yea^r are : 
President, Rev. A. S. Bowman; Vice- 
President, B. H. Einink; Secretary, Rev. 
A. R. Merrill ; Treasurer, Rev. J. E. Har- 
wood. Brother Einink has not yet sig- 
nified his acceptance. If he does the 
State Association will have a strong 
staff of officers. 

And now what of this .convention in 
its effects? We beheve that it did not 
meet in vain. It may be but a drop in 
the bucket, but it was a drop. And God 
delights in blessing small things all out 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



211 



of proportion to their size and value in 
men's sight. May He own the labors of 
these two days, what led up to them 
and what shall follow them. 

We cannot close without acknowl- 
edging the friendly entertainment which 
was accorded us at the home of Bro. 
Daniel Stoudt. — Rev. J. W. Brink in 
The Banner. 



SECRETARY STODDARD'S LETTER. 

New York, N. Y., Oct. i8, 1909. 
Dear Cynosure : 

Again the greeting is from this great 
metropolis. Twice a year for many 
years it has been my custom to seek those 
I may hope to influence among the team- 
ing millions here. At each visit I find 
the old friends renew for the Cynosure, 
and new names are added. While our 
work is probably not more popular 
with the masses than in other years, op- 
portunities are always found to lec- 
ture where the truth is welcome. I find 
the harvest always comes in due time, 
where the. seed is wisely sown. 

My pleasant and in a measure satis- 
factory visit to Friends of the Western 
Yearly Meeting at Plainfield, Indiana, 
was reported in my last. The Indiana 
Yearly Meeting, which followed, as is 
the custom, at Richmond, Ind., repre- 
sents the largest division of the Friends 
church. It reported some 20,600 mem- 
bers under its care. While I did not 
secure the consideration I had hoped at 
this meeting, I found, as expected, many 
who see the truth, as we do, on the anti- 
secrecy line. The testimony of the con- 
secrated ones was the same : ''Wherever 
the lodge was strong among the member- 
ship, the church was found to be weak." 
There is a splendid field for a wise work- 
er among these Friends. I am confi- 
dent that with a wise effort, the mem- 
bership of these churches could be arous- 
ed and the leaders, who now stand in 
the way of the facts getting to the peo- 
ple, would fall in line. 

While at Richmond, I looked in on a 
meeting of Ohio Synod Lutheran Pas- 
tors holding a conference in Pastor 
Beck's church. The kind hospitality ex- 
tended by Pastor Beck and family was 
very cheering as was other support giv- 



en here by our Lutheran friends. A 
Sabbath and ^londay spent at Fair- 
mount, Ind., gave opportunity to preacli 
in the Baptist church and lecture in the 
Wesleyan Methodist. The reform fires 
are kept burning at this place, notwith- 
standing strong opposition on the part 
of some. A minister, who, I was inform- 
ed, preaches much about Shakespeare, 
etc., said to me: "I saw a number of 
men who drank and gambled, and were 
not reached by the church. They were 
prejudiced against it. I went down to 
them and became one of them." He had 
become a Mason and Oddfellow, and 
reasoned that he was doing as did Paul, 
' 'becoming all things to all men." I am 
indebted to many at Fairmount for kind 
assistance but especially to my old school 
friends, Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Winslow and 
Brother Baker, the Wesleyan pastor. 

In passing Dayton, Ohio, I had over 
an hour's visit with our aged brother, 
ex-Bishop Milton Wright, father of the 
celebrated Wright brothers. Meetings 
in the Free Methodist church at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, were not largely attended, ow- 
ing to unusual conditions. 'it was thought 
good was accomplished. Brother Shaw, 
the pastor, is doing good work, bearing 
faithful testimony against the evils of our 
times. 

Two days were given to Pittsburg, 
Pa., work. This is indeed a smokv citv, 
but there are many true hearts and will- 
ing workers. 

At home, I attended and took part 
in the Friends' church meeting on "Rallv 
Day." The increased attendance that 
day was pleasing. 

I was glad to be able to attend the 
meeting of the New England Christian 
Association, Oct. 6th and 7th, at Bos- 
ton, Mass. It was here, my sainted fath- 
er labored in the closing years of a 
blessed life. ]\Iy going was in response 
to the invitation to deliver an address. 
This was duly given in the First United 
Presbyterian church before an audience 
of some 300. at the closing session of the 
meeting. The other speakers of the 
evening were Revs. R. C. Reed and S. 
McNaugher, both of Cambridge, [Mass. 
At the business session, officers were 
elected as follows: President, Rev. S. 



212 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



McNaugher; Vice-president, Mrs. Ella 
A. Gleson; Corresponding Secretary and 
Superintendent of the House, Mrs. Anna 
E. Stoddard; Clerk, Rev. R. C. Reed; 
Treasurer, Mr. Edward D. Conant ; Audi- 
tor, Mr. L. E. Lincoln. An hour was 
given to a memorial service for my fath- 
er, the late James P. Stoddard. Kind 
fitting words were spoken by Rev. J. A. 
McElwain, Prof. John A. Nichols, Rev. 
C. L. Page, and others. A great life is 
missed, but we believe a crown with 
many stars has been obtained by this one 
gone before. 

We approach the convention to be held 
here in New York City the 26th, with 
expectation. We hope to be favored by 
hearing from many competent ones pre- 
sent the various phases of the question 
which we plan to canvass. Meetings 
have been held in the Third Christian 
Reformed church, Paterson, N. J. ; in 
the Free Methodist, and 27th Street Nor- 
v^egian Lutheran churches, Brooklyn, N. 
Y. Invitations are in hand from the 
Christian and Missionary Alliance Train- 
ing. School, the First Pentecostal church 
of the Nazarenes, Brooklyn, N. Y., and, 
if Pastors Yunge and Vander Heuvel 
arrange as they hope, in a New York 
General Council Lutheran church, also 
the Christian Reformed church in Pas- 
saic, N. J., where we met in convention 
last year. 

I am seeking each day for grace and 
strength to do faithfully the work at 
'hand. Next month I shall (D. V.) go 
west to such work as pur General Sec- 
retary v=hall direct and friends arrange 
for. 

Yours in His service, 

W. B. Stoddard. 



address ought to be printed in tract 
form and scattered broadcast. 

R, A. McCoy. 



New Brighton, Pa., Oct. 8, 1909. 
Editor of Cynosure: 

I have just read Miss S. F. Hinman's 
article in the October Cynosure. To my 
mind this is one of the strongest articles 
I have ever read on the subject, though 
I have been with the anti-secret cause 
and a r^tndent of the movement for more 
than tlinty years. Miss Hinman surely 
has made this great cause a matter of 
deep study. Would to God more of our 
women would follow her course. Her 



LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Dermot, Ark., Oct. 8, 1909. 

Dear Cynosure — ^^It seems so 'strange 
to me to hear so many preachers say that 
secret orders help men to be better. I 
don't see where they help anyone unless 
it is to forget God. 

An editorial in one of our religious pa- 
pers the other day — the editor of this 
paper is a preacher — said: "What can 
be done to turn the minds of the people 
to higher and nobler things? Thoughtful 
leaders are becoming alarmed." While 
writing this article, he said, he had in 
mind thirty young men who formed 
themselves into an entertainment club, 
and assessed each other $2.25, which was 
paid and all the arrangements for the en- 
tertainment (ball) were perfected in less 
than forty-eight hours. Suppose these 
same young men, said the editor, were 
asked to give that much money for the 
church in six months, and yet $67.50 was 
made up in such a short time for a ball. 

Now this good minister and editor — I 
say good, because he is truly a good and 
great man^ — ^^wants to know what can be 
the cause of the degeneracy among the 
young, and asks, 'Ts the fault in the 
teaching they receive in schools, or in the 
homes, or is it in the manner of conduct- 
ing the worship in our churches?" He 
says that if in the latter, the leaders 
should set to work at once to make the 
church services so attractive as to give 
the young people a greater desire to at- 
tend them than they have for the sense- 
less frivolities in which they delight to 
engage. And yet this good man belongs 
to the very thing that is helping these 
young men to spend their money for 
balls. All of the lodges give dances and 
the young people are but following their 
leaders, preachers and editors. 

These leaders have sworn to have their 
throats cut from ear to ear. No man can 
serve two masters. Can the preacher 
teach the young men to swear up stairs 
in the Upper room, and then come down 
to the church and be able to teach them 
to obey God? Matthew 5:34 says, 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



213 



''Swear not at all." These are the Sa- 
vior's own words, which He told the 
preachers to teach; "teaching them to 
observe all things whatsoever I have 
commanded you." 

I hope some day the ministers will see 
and understand God's Word and take 
heed to it. Brother Phillips, it looks to 
me as though it is betraying Jesus for 
money. As though some of these preach- 
ers had taken a sop with Jesus and then 
betrayed Him. The young people will 
never come to the church if Christ is not 
lifted up. He said that if I be lifted up 
I will draw all men. Can a man lift up 
Christ while he himself is disobeying His 
commandment's? Jesus said, "If you love 
me you will keep my commandments." 

Alost of the ministers down South here 
are afraid to speak even against whisky. 
The minister is so tied up in the devil's 
net of secrecy that he is afraid he will be 
killed if he tells the truth. 

I was at Hollis, Ark., last month, and 
a mother told me that her son-in-law was 
a vile sinner. He joined the Masons 
three years ago to protect himself, if he 
got into trouble. After taking the Ma- 
sonic god for his god he thought he 
could deliver him out of anything he got 
into, so he went to one of the merchants 
here in Dermott and mortgaged four 
mules and a wagon, which he did not 
own, and bought an old horse. He would 
borrow^ a team when he came to town, 
and he said to the -merchant, ''Here is my 
team ;" and by this means he got all the 
goods he wanted. In the fall of last year 
the merchant began to ask dif- 
ferent people what was the matter 
with the man, "why don't he come 
to me about settling his debt?" 
and the merchant asked him about his 
son-in-law. He had not heard about the 
team until the merchant told him ; the 
father was astonished and said. My 'son- 
in-law don't own anything, he had an old 
horse, but it is dead now. Dififercnt ones 
had told him that the merchant wanted 
to see his son-in-law, but he did not 
know about the mortgage. 

One day a friend of this young man 
said, ''If you don't go and see your mer- 
chant, it will go hard with you." He re- 
plied, "No, the Masons won't let me get 



hurt." But, alas ! the poor fellow is in 
the penitentiary for getting goods on a 



false mortgage. 



His god could not de- 



liver him. 

Lord, hasten the day when the minis- 
ter will get his eyes opened and warn 
the people ! 

Lizzie Woods. 



Congo, Shannon Co., Mo., Aug. 31, '09. 
J. F. CuUor, Esq. : 

Dear Sir — Yours of the 27th inst. 
reached me in yesterday's mail. In re- 
ply permit me to say that I am glad to 
receive such letters, and that you attend- 
ed the meeting of the National Christian 
Association. You ask, "Will you kindly 
tell me your relations with lodges in a 
short way?" Certainly. I have none. 
I ''have renounced the hidden things of 
dishonesty." To-wit., Good Templarism, 
Odd Fellowship and Freemasonry. God 
the Holy Spirit led me out of all of them. 
To reply in detail to each of your ques- 
tions would require a pamphlet and to 
trace the history of the persecutions 
through which I have passed since com- 
ing out of lodgery would require a vol- 
ume. The losses which I have sustained 
have kept me in poverty — I lost sixteen 
head of horses and mules since coming 
here. Eight teams have died for me 
here, mysteriously. If they are not 
working against me one way, they cer- 
tainly are working some other way all 
the time. I -have a way of finding out 
their villainy. 

We are drinking the waters of Mara 
just now, but we shall reach Gilgal with 
this reform in due time, and all the bit- 
terness will be forgotten when God rolii 
away our reproach and wipes the tears 
from our eyes. 

"If thou has whispered truth, 

Whisper no longer. 
Speak in the trumpet tones 
Louder and stronger." 
God bless you ; farewell. Cordially 
yours, 

Elder G. F. Dissetie. 



"I am charged by the lodge people of 
being untrue to the orders that I once be- 
longed to. I want to say right here thar 
I am just as untrue to the lodges that I 



214 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



once belonged to, as I am to all the rest 
of the works of the devil that I used to 
be connected with. It is impossible for a 
man to be a Christian and get into the 
kingdom of heaven and be contaminated 
and mixed up with the world and its do- 
ings." — J. DiMMiCK Taylor^ Evangelist. 



A PENNSYLVANIA CORRESPONDENT 
WRITES. 

Highspire, Pa., Sept. 3, 1909. 

I feel pressed to write down a few 
thoughts and experiences for publication 
in the Cynosure. The State Conven- 
tion at Lancaster was very encour- 
aging and uplifting to us all. I received 
many congratulations and wishes for 
God's speed in opposing the Lodge evil. 
My heart is often made sad to see the 
deception, delusion and worldliness left 
in the trail of this slimy lodge serpent, 
especially among the lodge ministers, 
who cornpromise, shut their eyes to, sell 
out, and defend this great evil. The 
base ball grounds are about one square 
from my home and I see the eager, 
anxious, nerve-straining crowd march- 
ing to the game. I notice it is composed 
of gamblers, whoremongers, saloonkeep- 
ers, worldlings, cold and formal profes- 
sors and hireling lodge ministers. Now 
they are within the gates. Shortly I hear 
the cries, yelds and cheers rent the air. 
Sometimes I think it exceeds the uproar 
at Ephesus when they cried. Great is 
Diana, and sometimes I imagine it 
sounds like the shrieks of lost souls in 
perdition. Oh, God, pity the religious 
professor who must needs go to the 
world for his pleasure ! 

The other day I met a lodge minister 
and some of his members, all base ball 
enthusiasts. They surrounded me and one 
of them said, Brother White thinks it is 
wrong for a Christian to attend base- 
'bal'l games. A lodge minister present 
said, ''Well, I attend, and I don't see 
any harm; in fact, I think I do some 
good there. Last week a man told me 
that the boys don't swear near as much 
when I am there." I said, ''What an 
awful commotion that must make, when 
they get away from the field and out of 
your presence, and the bottled up oaths 
are given vent in curses and blasphe- 



mies." The fact is, Jesus Christ did not 
come into the world to suppress sin, but 
to save His people from their sins. One 
asked me, "Did you ever read, where 
Paul said, I am made all things to all 
men, that I might by all means save 
some. I Cor. 9:22?" I said, "You will 
find he made the Gospel without charge, 
and became a servant to all, that he 
might save some. But if I am to judge 
the construction of this Scripture, by 
3^our defense of, consent to, and co- 
operation with all modern evils, pleas- 
ures, lusts, and pastimes, I should con- 
sider it a virtue to be found in places 
where liquid damnation is dealt out over 
the bar, and in gambling hells, lodges, 
theaters, and where euchre parties are 
enjoyed. We are to reprove, warn, re- 
buke, admonish, exhort, plead, weep for 
the unsaved, not to have a joily good 
time with the boys!" 

The anti-secrecy preacher strikes from 
the shoulder, gives the plain, unvarnish- 
ed truth, shows the difference between 
clean and unclean, the holy and profane, 
specifies and uncovers sin. He tells of 
judgment as well as mercy. Tells that 
this unequal yoke with the Vv^orld m.ust 
be broken this side of eternity; tells that 
the mystic chain will not loosen when 
the spirit leaves the body ; tells that the 
saying that "odd fellowship is founded 
on the Bible" is a malicious, mutilated 
lie, wrested from Eph. 5:11, where it 
says "No fellowship." 

I wish I could shake hands with every 
anti-secrecy preacher and worker and 
bid them God speed, and say, "Fear not, 
be not dismayed, be strong and of good 
courage. The glory shall be all thine, 
the blessed Lord be ours." 

Your brother in Christ, 

John S. White. 



A STRIKING PERSONALITY. 

"He has a powerful personalitv, hasn't 
he?" 

"Indeed, yes. Why, he can attend con- 
ventions without hanging lodge badges 
all over his front, and many of the dele- 
gates recognize him." 



Over-sensitiveness and resentment evi- 
dence a want of love. 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



215 



from ®ur fecbangea^ 



THE CALL. 

O brave hearts, 

O strong hearts, 
O loyal hearts and true; 
O hear ye not that loving call? — 
The Master waits for you. 

O brave hearts, 

O strong hearts. 
The world your strength has known; 
Refuse it not to Him who calls, 
And claims it for His own. 

O brave hearts, 

O strong hearts, 
The world will gnash and frown, — 
It always does on such as seek 
To put its kingdom down. 

brave hearts, 

O strong hearts, 
In His great name, go forth 
In answer to the east, the west. 
The south, and icy north. 

O brave hearts, 

O strong hearts. 
The strength which shall be yours 
Is even that which was not born, 
And evermore endures. 

O brave hearts, 

O strong hearts. 
No word of yesterday 
Is yours to bear, but Gospel truth. 
That ne'er shall pass away. 

O brave hearts, 

O strong hearts. 
Be loyal, staunch and true 
To Him who calls you to His work. 
And who has need of you. 

O brave hearts. 
O strong hearts. 
When here your labors cease, 
The Lord who calls will crown your work 
With everlasting peace. 
— A. F. Rohr, in "Lutheran Standard.'* 



''The Christian who hcloiii^s to the se- 
cret order is hnkcd with their iniquities. 
If he be a ^^lethodist he i.s forced to ally 
himself with those who, havin"^ no regard 
for honesty and decency, raise money in 
dances, card parties and raffles, which the 



rules of his church forbid him taking 
part in. 'Tis true he may not attend 
these, but he is of the same fellowship 
with those who do. He has fellowship 
with the unfruitful works of darkness." 
— The Christian Witness. 



"Sam Jones said once that there would 
not be enough men in heaven to sing bass. 
It is evident that the church would in- 
deed 'be in a bad predicament were it not 
for the ministrations of the faithful 
women. The lodges have captured the 
most of the men and are destroying not 
only their usefulness, but their hope of 
getting to heaven." — The Free Method- 
ist. 



The Waterford Magnet of Waterford, 
Ohio — in its issue of June 27, publishes 
a "Sermon to the ]\Iaccabees" on Stmday 
evening by the pastor of the Presbyter- 
ian church, Rev. Francis Carruthers. He 
read a chapter from the first book of the 
Maccabees. The ability and character 
of the sermon may be fittingly judged 
from the following cjuotation : 

"Those churches and ministers that de- 
nounced secret societies, like the Macca- 
bees, did not know human nature. Such 
ministers were either unhappily married 
or had been jilted in love and were total- 
ly unfit to pass judgment on anything 
that concerned the best life of the fam- 
ly, the community, or the nation." 



A recent bill, passed in Georgia, makes 
it a misdemeanor for negroes to use the 
names, regalia, or emblems of Masons, 
Odd Fellows, Elks, and other secret or- 
ders that originated and are carried on 
by the white race. As the negroes have 
a membership of 20,000 in the orders re- 
ferred to, there is great indignation con- 
cerning this law, especially as similar re- 
strictions are threatened by other South- 
ern states. Now', wdiile we do not con- 
sider it a serious loss to the colored race, 
to be deprived of the lodge names, re- 
galia, emblems, etc., but rather a bless- 
ing, two questions present themselves for 
consideration: (i) If the lodge is a 
good thing, and of value to all mankind, 
why deprive the colored man of its 
vaunted benefits? (2) How can lodge 



, 



216 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



mem'bers reconcile their claim of a 
broad humanitarianism with the spirit of 
utter selfishness, as shown by the enact- 
ment that bars out the negro? Once 
more secrecy is revealing- itself by its 
fruits. — The Gospel Messenger. 



his schoolmates were doing a war dance 
around his clothing. There was a scat- 
tering when the officer appeared, but he 
captured four. — Chicago Daily Tribime. 



FOREIGN ANTI=LODGISM. 

An ordinance just passed in Java falls 
heavily upon Chinese secret societies. A 
fine of 100 guilders or three months' rig- 
orous imprisonment is the penalty for 
every Chinaman found in possession of 
secret society documents or emblems or 
caught wearing the distinguishing marks 
of these organizations. Those who pre- 
side over the meetings of such societies, 
allow meetings to be held in their houses, 
or fail to inform the authorities incur 
similar penalties. The latter also fall 
upon Chinamen who recruit for these so- 
cieties, supply them with money, or give 
help in any way. — The Mennonite. 



We cannot question the soundness of 
the position that a hrotherhood or so- 
ciety formed within a school to promote 
the interests of its own members and to 
gain advantages for them, is selfish in its 
spirit and is not democratic. Its. inter- 
ests are the interests of a few, of a class, 
and not of the whole school. But this 
reasoning will be found to have some un- 
expected applications. A secret frater- 
nity in a college seems open to the same 
objection. And secret orders within a 
republic come under the same condemna- 
tion. — The Christian Statesman. 



NAKED BOY RIDES A BICYCLE. 

High School Fraternity Initiation Goes 

the Limit in Michigan. 

Allegan, Mich, Sept. 7. — (Special.) — 
Allegan was shocked last night at the 
newest method of initiation adopted by 
the boys of a local high school fraternity. 
Verne Johnson, aged 16, was forced to 
take off his clothes and ride through 
the business streets on a bicycle. 

There were several persons on the 
street when young Johnson with his 
teeth chattering from the icy breezes ped- 
aled as swiftly as possible around the 
town. 

Deputy Marshal Frank Stafford fol- 
lowed the boy to where nearly twenty of 



RESIDUOUS BARBARISM. 

In the old days when grandfathers of 
present college students were themselves 
undergraduates, hazing meant abuse of 
freshmen by sophomores. Class out- 
rages may be less frequent now, but 
there is plenty of fraternity initiation. 
Moreover, much of the interest of 
secret society initiations in general, 
depends on hazing methods. Abuse 
is often pushed to the point of 
risk, and even actual injury. Wherever 
found, its spirit and method are well 
characterized in the folloiwing paragraph 
from the Springfield Repuhlican. Though 
short it is full, and it carries the impul- 
sive force of two newspapers and two 
colleges : 

"College hazing involves the mob 
spirit. Boys or girls incite each other 
to deeds which as individuals they would 
not he guilty of. President Thomas, of 
Bryn Mawr college, rejoices that the self- 
government association of students 
there has decided 'to give up once and 
for all the silly and ungenerous practice 
of teasing, embarrassing and hectoring 
the younger and inexperienced students. 
However slight this hectoring ^may have 
been, it was uncivilized and barbarous.' 
This characterization is masterly and of 
wide application. Hazing is 'both un- 
manly and unwomanly, and does not find 
its root in the generous helpfulness that 
m.arks large natures. It is to be' noted 
that some 30 hazers have been suspended 
at Muhlenberg college in Pennsylvania. 
In commenting upon that instance the 
Philadelphia Press notes that the bru- 
tality involved is akin to the movement 
of mobs: Tn the mass it dares; as a 
unit it is an abject coward. The indi- 
viduals of a hazing or lynching mob are 
mostly pitiable myrmidons and the rest 
contemptible curs.' This is severe, but 
not unjust." 

"Secrecy is the sexton that is digging 
graves for the burial of all that is pure 
and virtuous." 

D. N. Gish. 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



217 



AN ILLUSTRATION. 

Some years ago a certain preacher was 
sent to an appointment, and the members 
complained that he was aHenating rather 
than drawing the people, because he took 
no part in their ungodly suppers and 
'bazaars ; but instead of doing so he 
preached against them. The Masonic 
brethren msisted that he should join their 
lodge and try to win them if they were 
wrong, instead of denouncing lodgery as 
he did. It chanced as he and his congre- 
gation came from the church one Sun- 
day after morning service, that they saw 
a party of men trying to pull a horse out 
of a quagmire into which it had sunk 
nearly to its head. They laid planks out 
to where the horse had sunk and had suc- 
ceeded in getting a cable rope fastened 
around its body. The rope reached to the 
shore, and a pair of oxen were hitched to 
it, and by this means they could pull the 
horse out. Our preacher friend walked 
up and advised that thev drive the oxen 
into the mire with the horse and take a 
short hitch. At this, his church officials 
demurred, insisting that to do so would 
swamp the oxen as well as the horse. 
''Well," said the preacher, "that is ex- 
actly what you are advising me to do." — 
The Burning Bush. 



Furniture City Hive, L. O. T. M. M., 
will give a pedro party at the home of 
Pleasant avenue, Tuesday after- 
noon, at 2 :30. 

Where such a worldly spirit rules we 
indeed wonder that so many who pro- 
fess to be "Christians" — that means 
"anointed with the Holy Spirit, to be 
prophet, priest and king"— can belong 
to such organizations. It certainly proves 
that their "Christianity" is far from be- 



inof what it should be. 



-The Banner 



That many secret societies are exceed- 
ingly worldly in their character, so that 
balls and pedro parties are held fre- 
quently is shown tiirfe and again by an- 
nouncements in the daily papers. They 
also show that much of the "charity" be- 
stowed by the lodges is only charity in 
name, since ice cream socials must be 
held to render the aid needed by the 
sick. Here is a sample of such : 
Announcements. 

The general relief committee of Odd 
Fellows and Rebeccas will gnve an ice 
cream social Tuesday evening at the 

home of Mr. and Mrs , Central 

avenue. The proceeds are to go for the 
aid of a sick Rebecca. 

Sycamore Camp, No. 2488, M. W. A., 
will give the last social entertainment at 
its hall on Wealthy avenue, Monday 
evening. It will conclude with a dance. 

Seven Stars Rebecca lodge will give 
a calico ball to-night at 10 and 12 Lyon 
street. 



D. L. MOODY 
On Secret Societies. 

The following extract is from the 
United Presbyterian Worker, Phdkdel- 
phia, for April, 1876. 

"Mr. Moody is generally fearless in 
the utterance of 'hi-s convictions. An il- 
lustratioin of this may be given. In one 
of his 'Bible reatliings' in this city liis 
subject was 'Walking with God.' He 
read and explained several passages re- 
lating to this subject. Turning to 2 Cor. 
vi. 14, he read, 'Be ye not unequally 
yoked together with unbelievers.' 'Now,' 
said he, 'some of you may be hit by what 
I have to say on this text. But I pray 
Goid to help me to tell you the truth.' 
'Amen, ' 'amen,' came from 'several quar- 
ters in the audience. 'Some of you that 
are saying 'amen' mav get hit,' said 
Moody. Then reaiding the passage again, 
'Be ye not unequalilv yoked together with 
unbeHevers,' his first remark was, as 
nearly as we can remember, 'Some of 
vori w'ould give up your co'nnection with 
secret "SO'cieties if you wiould obey that 
text. Believers and unbeliever's are to- 
gether in these, and Christians are thus 
unequally yoked.' " 

In the Hiopodrome, New York. 

Mr. Moo'dy has made a record against 
the anti- Christ of t)he lodge of which no 
honest Christian mam need be ashamed. 
In Brookl>fn he bore t'estimo«n\- that the 
assumed henevolence oif the lodge cannot 
be 'compared with the exercise of the 
genuine virtue bv the church. In Phil- 
adelphia, he explained the word of God 
to be against the lodge alliance, an-d in 
tlie crow^ded Hippodrome m New York 
he repeats thi's exposition, an':l shows 
that his testim'ony is not heard alone be- 
for the public audience. In this good 



I 



218 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 




D. L. MOODY 

work Mr. M'oody literally follows the 
Lord, wiho i'or UiS ''made Hi'mself no 
reputation." For a popular evangelist 
of Mt. Mo!0'dy's ex'perien<ce to .stand for 
this truth before the whole Chriistian 
woirld, i'S an a'ct of moral courage only 
to he lookeid foir in one led hy the Spirit. 
The New York Witness thus reports his 
remarks on Wednesday, April 5, 1876 : 

''Now look at 2d Thess'alonians iii., 
6: 'Now we 'command yoii brethren, in 
the name of loiir Lord Jessus Christ, that 
ye withdraw yourselves froin every 
brother that walketh disorderly and not 
after the tradition which he received of 
us ;' and 2d Corinthians vi., 14 : 'Be ye not 
unequally 3^0 ked together with unbel'iev- 
ers ; for what fellowship hath rig:hteo'U'S- 
ness with umnighteousness, and what 
communion hath li^ht with darkness? 
Wiherefore come out from amono- them, 
and be ye separate, 'said the Lord, an'd 
touch not the unclean thing, amd I will 
receive you.' Now if that is not a very 
clear language, that if we are going to 



keep 'company with God we Ihave got to 
be separated froiii the world, I don't 
know what is. I don't know but that it 
would be a good thing to stop preaching 
the Gospel, and preach ise'paration. This 
idea that Christians have got to be mixed 
up with ungoidly men, is all icontrary to 
the word of God. Oh ! that some prophet 
wo'uld be raised up that would 'cry sepa- 
ration until we get the church of God 
separated frotm the world! 'Be ye not 
unequally yoked together with unbeliev- 
ers.' So'me 'say that it is matrimoiny. 
When I was in Philadelphia I spoke up- 
on the text, and after the sermon a min- 
ister icame d'own and said he agreed in 
almo(St all I said, 'but I don't think,' said 
he, 'that it meant secret soicieties.' 'Do 
you belong to one ?' I said. He sai'd yes. 
You see people will not admit that a text 
applies to 'tlhemselves. I think the thing, 
however, is very plain. Lf I am yoked 
up with an ungodly man luow is God 
going to walk with me? How are we 
going to walk together except we be 
agreed? Mr. Moody then proceeded to 
show that in business and in matrimony 
we should be united with Christians, and 
in a general way urged upon all Chris- 
tians the necessity of not conforming to 
this world, but keep constantly looking 
to Jesus." 

In Chicago at a Christian Convention. 

Is it consistent with a deep state of spir- 
ituality to unite with secret societies and 
take their oaths? 

Answer by Mr. Moody. — Of oourse 
every man must do as he pleases. I 
can't speak for others^ but I could not be- 
long to a secret society. Christ said, 
"In secret have I said nothing;" and 
Paul says, "Be not unequally yoked to- 
gether with unbelievers." I would not 
like to be yoked up with unbelievers in 
anything*. I doai't see h'ow a Christian 
man can yoke himself in partnership 
with an unconverted man. I know a 
Christian who is in diffiicuity now. He 
formed a pa^rtnership with two uncon- 
verted m'8n, and they have dotne some- 
thing which will coimproniisc him — break 
him — ^or make him do "an infamous thing. 
Separate yourselves from the world and 
the things of the world. God wants His 
people separate. They will have ten 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



219 



thousand times more influence w^hen sep- 
arate from the world. It is seiparation, 
not compromise that we want. The cry 
oug!ht to be raised all over this Western 
coimtry, ''Separation, sfparation !" But 
people' will say, If you take that stand — 
lift yourselves so hig'h — a great many of 
these men will leave tihe cliurch. Never 
mimd. If we sh3uld lose some church 
members we shall gain man}- that are 
better men. Hundreds will come in and 
take their places. There should be no 
compromise. Some tr\- to control 'the 
pulpits on this 'subject. They say, ''He 
don't preadh according- to our ideas. We 
don't want 'him." May God, in His love, 
deliver us from the many difficulties we 
have to contend against." 

Later in Farwell Hall, Chicago. 
In hi'S Bible reading, in Farwell Hall, 
Dec. 14, 1876, Mr. Moo'dy took for his 
theme, "Walking with Gcd." As one O'f 
the conditions of this state 'he mentioned 
separation from the ungodly, quoting 
srether with unbelievers." These words, 
'he 'said, must mean something, and he 
made three distinct ap'piications of them : 
as forbidding busines/s partnerships with 
unbelievers, entering the marriage rela- 
tion with an 'unbeliever, and joining sec- 
ret lodges. On the last topic 'he 'said : 'T 
expect I will be treading on some one's 
toes, perhaps some in the audience, and 
perlhaips some of these niiinisters ; but out 
with it. I do not see (how any Christian, 
most O'f all] a Christian minister, can go 
into these secret lodges 'with unbelievers. 
They say they can 'have more influence 
for good, but I say they can have more 
influence 'for gtcod by staying out of 
them, and then reproving their evil 
deeds. Abraham Ihaid more influence for 
goc'd in Sodom than Lot 'had. If twen- 
ty-five Christians go into a secret lodge 
with fi'ft}' 'W'ho are not Christians, the 
fifty can vote anything they rplease, and 
the twenty-five will be partakers of their 
sitn's. They arc unequally yoked with un- 
believers. *Tvut," says sicme one, "what 
do yo'U say about these secret temperance 
orders?" I say the same thin^. Do no 
evil that good may come. Y(ni never 
can reform anything by unequally vok- 
ing yourself with ungodly men. True 
reformers separate themselves from the 



world. ''But," you say, ">mi ihad one of 
them in your church." So I did, but 
when I found out what it was I cleaned 
it out like a cage of unclean birds. They 
■drew in a lot of young men of the church 
in the name of temperance, and then they 
got up a dance and kept them out till 
after 12 at niglit. I was a ipartaker of 
their sin because I let them get into the 
church; but they were cleaned out, and 
they never came hack. This idea of pro- 
moting temperance by yoking oneself up 
in that way with ungcdly men is abom- 
inable. The most ahominahie meeting I 
ever attended >was a temiperance meeting 
in England. It was full of secret socie- 
ties and there was no Christianity abo-ut 
it. I felt as though I had got into Sodom 
and get out as soon as I could. A man 
rescued from intemperance by a society 
not working on Gospel principles gets 
filled with pri'de and boasts about re- 
forming himself. Such a man is harder 
to save than a drunkard. "But, Mr. 
Moody," some say, "if you talk that way 
yO'U will drive all the members of secret 
societies out oi your meetings and out 
of your churches." But what if I do? 
Better men will take their places. Give 
them the truth anywa}', and if they 
would rather leave their churches than 
their lodges the sooner they get out of 
the ohurches the better. I would rather 
'have ten members who w^ere separated 
from the world than a thousand such 
memhers. Come out from the lodg^e. 
Better one with Gcid than a thousand 
without Hiim. We must walk with God 
and if only one or two go with us it is 
all rigiht. Do not let 'down the standard 
to S'uit men who love their secret l;^idsres 
or h'ave some darling sin tiie\' will not 
give up." 

Mr. Moody in Boston, Marcli 31, i«77. 
In a glowing dds course en the subject, 
''Walkin'g with God," ihe is rep-orted by 
the Boston Globe as saying : "W'liat right 
has a praying man to marry a frivolous, 
scoffincr voung ladv that iiates lesus 
Christ the Bridegroom of the church of 
God ? *Be ye not unequall}- yoked to- 
gether.' It means more than that. WHiat 
rigiit has a Christian man to be in some 
of those lodges wliere there are infi dels 
and skeptics that care not au'd scoff at 



220 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



the World of Go'd. The Word of God 
pumps nigiht througih suidh a profession 
laf faith. People want me to join clubs, 
reform club's, lodiges, etc. Not I. I will 
not yoke myself up with anything of the 
•sort. Separation is what we want if we 
would have power. Let us not vacdliate 
here and 'there and be catering to public 
opinion. I had rather be rejoicing in 
Christ, with God leading me, alone, than 
have all Boston applaudinig, waiking 
without Gold." 



SERPENTISM. 

The Watchman (Boston) of October 
7, contains an editorial article on the 
"Futility of Plotting," based en the Sun- 
day school lesson, "Paul a Prisoner — 
The Plot." We take the liberty to bor- 
row from this article. The plot referred 
to is that of more than forty Jews who 
bound themselves under a great curse 
not to eat or drink until they had killed 
Paul. The Watchman says in part : 
"Their plot was approved by the re- 
ligious leaders at Jerusalem." . . . 
"A plot is the method of those who are 
weak. It is like the wiliness of animals 
which, as the fox, cannot meet the more 
powerful creatures upon the open field." 
. . . "They are, however, terrifying 
because their secrecy makes them seem 
irresistible and undefined. No one knows 
when a blow is struck, as to how fcir 
the plot extends, or where 'and when it 
will execute its lawless will. It is ex- 
ceedingly difficult to ferret out, and may 
for a time defy all efforts 'at detection 
and suppression. To realize how terri- 
fying and demoralizing a plot may be, 
mark the effect of Black Hand writings 
and executions upon its victims and upon 
others in the same class of people." We 
pause to note that the Black Hand is a 
secret society, and is here recognized as 
conducting a plot. The writer of the 
article would perhaps confine the word 
plot to the specific instances in which 
warnings are sent ; but yet the plot is 
still that of an organized and perpetual 
conspiracy. Freemasonry also has its 
specific plots, and is an organized con- 
spiracy both in principle and in prac- 
tice. Responsibility for our comment 
does not rest on the Watchman. "But 



a plot is doomed from the start. Its se- 
crecy is far from being kept secure by 
its conspirators. . . . Its trail can- 
not be covered to hide all traces. All the 
dark forces of society like Nihilism and 
Black-handism are ill-fated. The best 
elements of society are against them. 
Public sentiment disapproves them. 
Soon or late they come to their natural 
end." 

"The first Christians had to meet those 
oppressive conditions that provoke plot- 
ting. Injustice, illegality, persecution 
were employed against them. But their 
principles were openly proclaimed, their 
assemblies were not secret, and they met 
their foes firmly and fairly face to face. 
Jesus said, T ever spake openly in the 
Temple.' Paul declared of the gospel, 
'This thing was not done in a corner.' 
The disciples of Christ were children of 
the light and not of the darkness. Their 
deeds were not deeds of darkness. They 
cordially invited investigation. 
The boldness . . . was a sign of 
the openness of the Christian movement 
and of its truth as bearing full investi- 
gation. Conspiracy and secrecy have no 
part in the method of the Master to ex- 
tend His gospel. . . . Jesuitism in 
the Roman Catholic system has some 
excellent features, but has been banish- 
ed from society and is under the ban of 
general public opinion because its secret 
methods have made it feared and hated. 
Any sort of serpentism will arouse the 
deadly enmity of the human mind." 



ARE FREEMASONS HONEST? 

A Few Plain Words to Members of the 

Great Craft. 

By an Ex-Subscriber to the Order. 
"Stupendous !" Such is the reply of the 
brethren when they have recovered their 
breath. "Stupendous ! Incredible ! Who 
can possibly have liad the audacity to ask 
such a question ? Who can possibly doubt 
the ing'enuousness of such an universal 
society as the Order of Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons?" Nevertheless, the 
writer suggests that a few home-truths, 
derived from a close personal knowledge 
of the internal administration of the craft, 
may not only prove interesting to the 
popular world at large, but will also re- 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



221 



veal the many weaknesses which exist 
in connection wtih this, the most gigantic 
brotherhood ( ?) that the world has ever 
known. 

What is Freemasonry ? A peculiar sys- 
tem of morality, veiled in allegory and il- 
lustrated by symbols. Open to all just, 
upright, and free men, of mature age, 
sound judgment and strict morals. A 
mighty organization founded on the three 
grand principles — Brotherly Love, Relief 
and Truth — universally spread over the 
earth's surface, and commanding a mem- 
bership the numerical value of which it 
would be extremely difficult to compute. 
Suffice it to say that under the English 
Constitution alone over 3,300 lodges have 
been consecrated. Moreover, the Eno:lish 
Constitution of Ancient and Accepted 
Freemasons is only one of many Grand 
Masonic Lodges scattered over the face 
of the globe. There is no town of what- 
ever nationality, no race of whatever 
creed or color, which does not boast of 
its Masonic lodge, and where the sign, 
token or word would not be recognized 
and acknowledged. 

The fundamental principles — Broth- 
erly Love, Relief and Truth — indicate the 
tenets of the order, which every candi- 
date for admission is bound by solemn 
oath to observe. Every candidate on his 
initiation is required to take an oath of 
fealty to the order in general, and to ev- 
ery individual member in particular, and 
to swear by oath and on the direst of 
death penalties that "should he ever meet 
a brother in distressed circumstances who 
might solicit assistance, he will cheerful- 
ly embrace the opportunity of relieving 
him to the best of his ability; to relieve 
his necessities; on no account to wrong 
him or see him wronged; to consider a 
brother's interests as inseparable from 
his own ; that the hand grip, when given 
to a brother Mason, shall be a sure pledge 
of brotherhood; to maintain a brother 
Mason's honor and carefully preserve it 
as his own ; not to injure him or suffer 
it to be done by others ; to shed a tear of 
sympathy for a brother in distress, and to 
pour the healing balm of consolation into 
his afflictions." Truly a great responsi- 
bility, but a responsibility which all Ma- 
sons undertake with their eyes open. 



Moreover, it is a responsibility which 
there are some few Masons always ready 
to fulfil. Masons honorable to their trust, 
men who are Masons not for what they 
can get out of it, but for the good they 
can do. Still the question is repeated — 
"Are Freemasons Honest?" 

In connection with the English United 
Grand Lodge of Freemasons there are 
three great institutions. These are the 
Royal Masonic Institution for Girls, the 
Royal Masonic Institution for Boys, and 
the Royal Masonic Benevolent Institu- 
tion. Each of these institutions has an 
important duty to fulfil, and to a certain 
extent fulfils that duty satisfactorily. The 
R. M. I. G. and the R. M. I. B. are insti- 
tutions founded to provide education for 
the daughters and sons respectively of 
deceased Freemasons. The R. M. B. I. 
grants annuities to aged Freemasons and 
to aged widows of Freemasons, amount- 
ing to £40 and £32 a year, respectively. 
These are laudable objects, worthy of 
the highest praise. These institutions are 
known all the world over, and are re- 
garded as supreme illustrations of that 
divine and heavenly gift — charity. But 
■the writer contends from intimate knowl- 
edge, acquired by years of experience — 

(i) That the huge sums of money 
annually subscribed to maintain these in- 
stitutions are not the outcome of those 
sentiments of Brotherly Love and Char- 
ity which are preached at every lodge 
meeting. 

(2) That the various committees 
whose duty it is to manage these institu- 
tions do not honestly fulfil their obliga- 
tions to the Craft. 

(3) That the lodges, individually and 
collectively, are often not honest in pro- 
tecting the interests of those who are de- 
pendent upon a deceased brother. 

First, each institution is maintained 
partly by an assured income, the result 
of investments, but mainly by the volun- 
tary subscriptions of the members of the 
order. In return for these subscriptions 
the names of the donors are publicly an- 
nounced through the press. Each sub- 
scriber is qualified to wear on his coat or 
Masonic collar a jewel varying accord- 
ing to the amount of his subscriptions. 
Also each subscriber has at his- control a 



222 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



number of votes for the forthcoming 
elections. Moreover, a full list of su'b- 
scribers is published each year by each 
institution. What a lucrative public ad- 
vertisement that would be, say, for a 
tradesman ! Imagine the increase of busi- 
ness that a manufacturer of pills w^ould 
enjoy, when it became publicly known that 
he had qualified as Patron — two hundred 
guineas — to one of these institutions ! A 
cheaper and better advertisement than a 
full page in one of the local dailies ! Yet 
if a brother Mason of more humble rank 
(though all are supposed to be Masonic- 
ally equal), had a child dying of sick- 
ness, his larder empty, and the landlord 
clamoring for rent, he might appeal a 
hundred times for support, and appeal in 
vain. Either his appeal would be alto- 
gether ignored or else a curt refusal 
would be the result. How many have had 
such an experience? How surprising 
would be the result if only such statis- 
tics could be obtained. 

Secondly, every year the gross income 
of each of these institutions is very con- 
siderably in excess of the gross expendi- 
ture. Grouping the three institutions to- 
gether, the gross income for the eight 
years 190 1- 1908 inclusive was £908,888 
9s. iid. ; while the gross expenditure did 
not exceed £479,648 8s. Although each 
of these institutions is already fabulous- 
ly wealthy, the R. M. I. B. alone having 
a capital account of over £400,000; yet, 
simply in order to show their authority, 
they reject at each and every election 
many candidates that have been duly 
tested and approved, several of them re- 
duced to the lowest grades of poverty 
and want. This the managing commit- 
tees have done and are still doing, and 
yet, during the last eight years they have 
invested no less a sum of money than 
£322,588 14s. 3d., to be added to an al- 
ready extensive capital account, paying 
no attention to the crying needs of the 
present generation. 

Thirdly, each candidate must be 
recommended and approved by the lodge 
of which the deceased or aged brother 
was a member. The petition must be 
signed in open lodge by the officers and 
brethren then present. Then why do the 
lodges not always support the petitions of 



which they approve ? Recently one ageci 
Freemason received ten votes and a 
widow received seven, whereas thou- 
sands of votes were necessary to secure 
election. Again, a boy at a recent elec- 
tion polled five votes, and a girl candidate 
received four. By the rules of the order, 
these candidates were approved by the 
various lodges concerned, and the breth- 
ren of these lodges by signing the peti- 
tion gave their promise to support their 
candidate to the utmost of their ability. 
Imagine the feelings of these two poor 
widowed mothers to find themselves thus 
deserted at a time when they most need- 
ed help. Were the brethren concerned 
honest? Comment is needless. Nor are 
these isolated cases. There are many of 
them. They occur regularly. Yet they 
fail to rouse the indignation of the mem- 
bers of that mighty organization. Free- 
masonry. It is a common occurrence to 
hear a Grand Officer, with his head full 
of self-esteem and his stomach full of 
champagne, give utterance in a post- 
prandial speech to those ''grand Masonic 
institutions by which the whole world is 
amazed," but no mention is made of the 
numerous sore disappointments which 
constantly come to light. 

There is in connection with the United 
Grand Lodge of Ancient and Accepted 
Freemasons a fund of benevolence. 
From every subscription which is an- 
nually paid by every member of the or- 
der, a small amount is set aside by 
Grand Lodge and used to augment this 
Fund of Benevolence. This fund, on 
December 31st last, amounted to £75,- 
416 3s. 6d. To this fund any brother in 
distressed circumstances, if he be a 
brother of five years' standing, may ap- 
peal for relief. Any such appeal must 
be made by petition duly signed by the 
master, officers and brethren of his lodge. 
The case is tested and approved by his 
lodge, and accordingly recommended by 
them for relief. Naturally, 'no case would 
be approved if there were not great dis- 
tress and urgent need for relief. This pe- 
tition is then heard by a committee called 
the Board of Benevolence. That is quite 
regular. Then why are so many petitions, 
regularly approved and recommended, 
so unceremoniously rejected without ex- 



November, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



223 



cuse, without rhyme or reason and with- 
out appeal? Still, on the other hand, 
Grand Lodges often make generous do- 
nations to charities which have no claim 
whatever upon the Masonic 'body. Sure- 
ly charity begins at home, and petitions 
from private lodges should not be re- 
jected to the detriment of the very men 
who have by their subscriptions made 
this Fund of Benevolence what it is. The 
writer could cite numerous examples of 
this gross injustice, but will only mention 
one. Not long ago the press exposed a 
case of a brother Mason who died from 
hunger and starvation in a common lodg- 
ing house, after having appealed in vain 
for the bare necessities of existence. Is 
this in accordance with the Grand Prin- 
ciples of the Masonic Order — Brotherly 
Love, Relief, and Truth ? Can it be that 
this is attributed to the fact that the huge 
donations of Grand Lodge — £i,ooo to 
this fund, £500 to that hospital, etc., are 
■publicly advertised, thus causing Free- 
m.asonr}- to be lauded to the skies, while 
the disappointments of individuals are 
kept secret and swallowed with disgust? 
Much more serious is the consideration 
of the attitude of Masons one towards 
another. As mentioned above every 
Mason, when passing through the three 
degress necessary before be can become 
a Master Mason, has to take a solemn 
oath that under all circumstances he will 
do all in his power to help a brother Ma- 
son, to protect his honor, and to pour the 
balm of consolation into his afflictions. It 
is quite true that there do exist Masons — 
few and far between — who make an hon- 
est effort to be true to their promise. Not 
so, however, is it with the vast majority 
of the brotherhood. The writer is well 
aware that this assertion will be ridiculed 
by those Masons who have never known 
what it is to want a meal, to have not a 
penny in the world, to seek in vain for a 
friend in need. To them Masonry is a 
brilliant mirror, reflecting all that is 
bright in the world. Yet let one of them 
choose a wealthy Mason ; there are plen- 
ty of them who could part with a thou- 
sand pounds and not miss it. Go to him, 
give him the familiar sign, and, if he will 
condescend to allow you, extend to him 
the grip of fellowship. Then tell him the 



wife and children are hungry and ask 
him for the gift or loan of five shillings. 
Instead of the request being granted, a 
curt refusal and an ignominious snub will 
be the result. He will then learn that so 
long as a brother is prosperous he is hail- 
fellow-well-met, and Masonry is a noble 
organization, full of charity and good 
work; but once he is down on his luck, 
Masonry becomes a mockery and a fraud. 
In short, the average Freemason of to- 
day is not honest. On his initiation he de- 
clares on oath that he seeks the privileges 
of Freemasonry ''uninfluenced by mer- 
cenary or other unworthy motives." 
More often than not, this is a deliberate 
lie, for he joins the order for what he 
can get out of it. Also he swears a sol- 
emn and binding obligation to his broth- 
er Masons, which obligation he ignores 
and forgets as soon as possible. — John 
Bull, July 31st, 1909, London, England. 



ii' 



THE FRATERNAL ORDER. 

A man w^as importuned to join a fra- 
ternal order. 

"I'll think it over," he said, as he 
walked down the street with the mem- 
ber of the fraternal order who was so 
solicitous about the matter. 

Just then the solicitous member ran 
into a man, or the man ran into him. . 

■''Get out of my way,", snarled the so- 
licitous member. 

"Get out yourself!" came an answer, 
as angry. 

The solicitous member had raised his 
arm to strike, and the man was prepared 
to do the same thing, when the soHcitous 
member, espying an emblematic button 
on the lapel of the man's coat, said : **0, 
pardon me, brother, I see you are a 
member of our order." 

"That's all right!" the man said, 
grasping the outstretched hand. 

"I'm trying to get my friend, here," 
said the so'licitous member, "to join our 
order." 

"You might as well stop trying," said 
the friend. 

"Why ?" the solicitous member asked, 
amazed. 'T thought you were on the 
point of joining us." 

"And so I was," he answered, "until 
vou and your brother member collided. 



Ii 



224 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1909. 



II 



Then I saw that you were ready to fight, 
without much provocation, until you dis- 
covered that he was a member of your 
order." 

"That's one of the strong points of 
our order," said the soHcitous member ; 
"we never fight another member of the 
order." 

''Well," his friend answered, 'T don't 
want to join any such fraternal order 
whose precept is to be brotherly only to 
brother members of the order. If I join 
any fraternal order it will 'be one 
whose precept is to be brotherly to all 
men." — Sel. 



THE RIVAL TEMPLES. 

The Freemasons of Boston, Mass., 
have suggested the rebuilding of Solo- 
mon's Temple by the Masons of the 
world, and that it is no mere dream, they 
have given practical shape to their design 
by applying for the incorporation of a 
company to take the matter in hand. As 
Freemasonry is so closely connected with 
the old Babylonian idolatry, we believe 
we see here another indication of Satan's 
design to anticipate the purpose of God. 
It is true that with many Freemasonry is 
merely an organization for good fellow- 
ship and for Ibenevolent philanthropy; 
but, by the confession of Masons them- 
selves who have described the ceremonies 
of initiation to the higher degrees, it is 
clear that it is one of the streams which 
flow from the old spring of Babylonish 
worship of the Sun-God. 

If the idea suggested above be correct, 
we are rapidly approaching the time of 
the end. God purposes that a temple 
shall be built on Mount Zion and He has 
designated the builder (Zech. vi. 12, 13), 
one greater than Solomon. Satan knows 
this and he will have his rival temple in 
anticipation, and will place his false Mes- 
siah in it. This is the temple which God 
rejects in Isa. Ixvi. i, 3. If this scheme 
of the Boston Miasons succeeds, and why 
may it not? for Masonry has consider- 
able influence in every land, it may bring 
us many steps nearer the final conflict 
which will end the age. — Words of Life, 
Sept., 1909, London, England. 



CHICAGO RELIEF CORPS ITEMS. 
No. 176. 

On April 27th, at 8 p. m., at 52 Dear- 
born street, Miss Kittie Falch, one of 
our members, will conduct a card party 
and raflie for the benefit of the Corps. 
The raflle will be for a 'beautiful bead 
purse made and donated by her mother. 
Score cards, 25 cents. All are cordially 
invited. 

No. 81 

The ladies surprised Frances Cable, 
the afternoon of the 2d on her birth- 
day. We all wish her as many birthdays 
and happy ones as she has had. We 
are just now doing all we can to help 
make Weitzel Post card party for the 
25th a success, and hope to see all friends 
at the hal'l. 

Twentieth Century Corps 

Is once more in good financial stand- 
ing. The President, Mayme Feller, and 
Secretary, Mrs. Field, gave three din- 
ners for the Corps and netted $6 each 
time. We also had a card party, and 
intend to keep up our good work. Now 
that the Corps is standing on a good ba- 
sis, some one took our four Color Bear- 
er's flags and just left the staffs for us; 
it was kind of them to leave us that 
much. Now we will have 'all that ex- 
pense for new flags. 

No. 281 

The sewing for the Easter Bazaar 
was at the home of our chairman. A 
splendid luncheon was served, and many 
dainty articles were completed. On 
March i6th, after a short meeting and 
initiation of Mrs. Benson, business was 
suspended and the rest of the afternoon 
was devoted to a card party. 
No. 279 

Has a very successful social to report. 
We were delightfully entertained at the 
home of our former treasurer, Mrs. E. 
Clausson, and now our fund is enriched 
to the amount of $13.80. Cards and mu- 
sic were the feature of the evening. 



Where one person is afflicted with fa- 
naticism there are no less than two thou- 
sand in the cold embrace of dead for- 
mality. 



Sin is poison to every faculty of man. Trials are the ailment of faith. 



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ETHICS OF MARRIAGE AND HOME LIFE. 

Secret Societies in Relation to the Home. 
By Rev. A. C. Dixon, p. D., pastor of Chicago 
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paid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 
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CHURCH AND LODGE. 

An Address Delivered at Mr. Moody's "Con- 
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Mass., by President Charles A. Blanchard, D. D. 
15 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A pack- 
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PERSONAL WORK: HOW TO SAVE CHRIS- 
TIANS FROM LODGES. 
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paid, 2 cents a copy. 

LODGE RELIGION. 

The Fundamental Doctrine, the "Universal 
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THE WORSHIP OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
OFFERED TO SATAN. 

Address by President Blanchard at the An- 
nual Convention of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, May 15, 1902. 

The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
but Masonry. The Governing Force is Masonry. 
The Greatest Masons are Our Teachers. Is Free- 
masonry a Religion? Is the Masonic Religion Chris- 
tian? What Kind of Religion is It? Marks of 
Demon Worship. Our Duty. 24 pages ; post- 
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ODDFELLOWSHIP A REUGIOXTS INSTI- 
TUTION 

And Rival of the Christian Church. 8 pages ; 
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WHY I LEFT THE REBEKAH LODGE. 

By Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull. 6 pages ; post- 
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cents. 

CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

What is Oddfellowship? Ought Christians to 
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fellows? Rebekah Lodge. By Rev. H. H. Hin- 
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WHY DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWS? 

By Rev. J. Blanchard. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
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THE "GOOD MAN '* ARGUMENT. 

God's Word or the Ofher Man's Conscience — 
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THE STRANGE CASE OF MR. GOODMAN. 

"Why Are There So Many Good Men in 
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ARE INSURANCF LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

The Modern Woodmen of America an illustra- 
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OUGHT CHRISTIANS TO HOLD MEMBER- 
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AMERICA? ' 

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LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

Should a Christian Participate In Them? 4 
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MASONIC OBLIGATIONS. 

Blue Lodge Oaths (Illinois Work) ; Masonic 
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FOES OF THE CHRISTIAN SABBATH. 

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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



850 W. Madison Street, 



CHICAQO. ILL. 




CHICAGO, DECEMBER, 1909. 




Polar Might. 

Thou 5erv!st 
A WAYMARK 



A Civil War Story 



A Supposed Case 



Fraternity Drinlcing 



Courts^ Colleges 

and Unions 



Jailed for Making 

Signs to Jury 



Jewish Fraternal 

Insurance Orders 



ml 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Nanaging Editor 
850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

MICE— Per year, in advance, $1.00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PSCSENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
xnakie a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Poet Office at Chicagxj, IJl., under Act of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Union and Shrine 225 

*December Twenty-ninth — Albert Pike's 

Day 225 K 

*Canadian Order of Chosen Friends... 225 

Masonic Funerals — An Inside View 226 

Expulsion and Embattled "Frats" 226 

A Supposed Case 227 

A Protest Against Secrecy 228 

By Rev. C. G. Sterling. 

Christ Rejected 229 

By Rev. William Dillon, D. D. 

Courts, Colleges, and Unions 230 

By Pres. Charles A. Blanchard. 

How to Overcome the Baal of Secrecy. . 233 

By Rev. J. M. Foster, D. D. 

The Lodge as It Is 235 

By E. A. Rassman. 

6riental Masonic Temple in Boston.... 237 

A Little Disturbance. 237 

Professor Woods on Freemasonry 238 

Eaves Droppings 238 

Chips from an East Shore Log 239 

Delta Upsilon Banquet 240 

Remember the N. C. A. with Gifts 242 

New York—New Jersey Convention.... 242 

Contributions 244 

Convention In New York 244 

Reported by Secretary Stoddard. 

Prom Mrs. Lizzie Woods 245 

Eastern Secretary in the West 246 

From Pikeville, Kentucky 248 

*A California Volunteer — Mr. Amos 



Wright 248 

Catholic Order of Fortesters — The Obli- 
gation 248 

From Rhea, Arkansas 249 

Not an Uncommon Experience 249 

From Louisiana 250 

From Illinois 250 

From New Jersey 250 

From Iowa .• 251 

From Congo, Missouri 251 

A Civil War Story 251 

Jewish Fraternal Insurance Orders.... 251 

The Ways of Labor Unions 252 

Puzzling Facts About Lodge Members . . 255 

Jailed for Making Sign to Jury 256 

The Boosters' Lodge 256 

SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete Illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes: "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THL 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By "Spectator," Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages; 
5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigious 
system, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion' ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
interesting. 30 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workings of 
Freemasonry, " by i:x>President Charles Q. Finney, 
of Oberlin College. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 





"Jesas answered him, — I spake openly to {be nurid; aod in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLII. 



CHICAGO, DECEMBER 1909. 



NUMBER 8 



UNION AND SHRINE. 

Late in the night of Sunday, October 
24, four buildings in different parts ot 
IndianapoHs, Indiana, were wrecked in 
part or wholly with dynamite believed by 
the police to have been used by members 
of labor unions. The malicious mischief 
was aimed at Albert von Speckelson, a 
contractor, constructing a Mystic Shrine 
temple and theater, who had failed to 
give employment which they desired to 
members of the labor unions. The con- 
tractor's planing mill was torn to pieces ; 
a branch exchange building under con- 
struction was damaged beyond repair; a 
branch of the public library which Von 
Speckelson was erecting was damaged to 
the extent of a thousand dollars. An 
explosion and fire in his stable destroyed 
two automobiles and killed two horses. 
During the fire one horse which had been 
a pet of the family staggered out of the 
stable dreadfully burned, so that it had 
to be shot by a policeman. 



December 29, 1909, is the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the birth of the 
''Patron Saint" of the Scottish Rite, 
iVlbert Pike. October 2d, the Supreme 
Council of the Southern jurisdiction 
adopted, in session in Washington, a res- 
olution providing for memorial services. 
In all parts of the world tijis saint's day 
is celebrated. Two hundred centennial 
medals are struck, bearing a bust of Pike, 
and the names of the members of the 
Supreme Council. Each active and em- 
eritus member of the council is entitled 
to one of the medals ; others are present- 
ed to foreign councils, and to such others 
as the Grand Commander decides to 
honor. 



THE CHURCH'S OPPORTUNITY. 

Rev. B. E. Bergesen, a prominent pas- 
tor in his denomination here in Chicago, 
will devote the month of December to 
giving addresses on the secret lodge sys- 
tem. Mr. Bergesen is no novice as a 
speaker upon this subject. Twice since 
holding his pastorate in this city he has 
been called to the Theological Seminary 
of the Missouri 'Synod Lutherans at St. 
Louis to give instruction in our reform 
to its students. Mr. Bergesen held a 
pastorate in an important Lutheran 
Church in Boston, previous to coming to 
Chicago, and during that time was close- 
ly associated with Rev. J. P. Stoddard 
and the New England Christian Asso- 
ciation, opposed to secret societies. For 
several years he has been a member of 
the Board of Directors of the National 
Christian Association, and we heartily 
commend him to any one who may be 
fortunate enough to secure his services. 
He may be addressed at the Cynosure 
office. 



Only nineteen fraternal insurance 
lodges have accepted even the premium 
rates of the National Fraternal Con- 
gress, and of these nineteen associations 
not one, it is said, has adopted a rate 
which will completely cover the costs of 
administration and meet fully the claims 
of the beneficiaries. 



"I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills 
from whence cometh my help." 



— The monthly journal representing 
the Canadian Order of Chosen Friends 
has published an interesting collection of 
facts briefly stated, from some of which 
we learn that the avei-age age of mem- 
bers entering tliis order in 1908 was 
28.45 > of those annulled and withdrawn, 
29.86; of those suspended, 30.68; of 
those in good standing, 39.98, and of 
those who died, 4S.85 years. The aver- 



226 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1909. 



age> age of those annulled and with- 
drawn was .41 more than one year high- 
er than that of those received; the aver- 
age age of those suspended, .23, more 
than two years above the average age of 
those accepted, and the average age of 
those still left in good standing was .53 
more than eleven years above that of 
initiates. 



MASONIC FUNERALS. 

A writer in the Masonic Trowel says 
this in part on the subject of Masonic 
funerals : 

^'This is becoming quite a popular and 
much discussed subject. The brother 
who does not come to lodge prepared to 
deliver a discourse on 'The Non-Attend- 
ance of Masons at Masonic Funerals' 
and the Masonic writer who does not 
record a few appropriate remarks, have 
not the best interest of Masonry at heart. 
How few, however, think of the neces- 
sity of considering the manner in which 
such funerals should be conducted. I 
feel quite at liberty to say that it is no 
less important that a Masonic funeral be 
conducted properly than that it be largely 
attended. In the first place, it should 
be borne in mind that it is a solemn occa- 
sion — not a picnic — and from the time 
the lodge is called to order until closed, 
each member should carry himself with 
the dignity and decorum that the charac- 
ter of the occasion and the reputation of 
. our fraternity should command. It is 
not necessary for one to publish the fact 
that he has attended through mere curi- 
osity or simply to help 'make up a 
crowd,' by loud talking and even laugh- 
ter. This conduct sometimes makes one 
wish 'the crowd' were smaller — by at 
least one." 



OUR DARLINGS' ABC BOOK. 

A handsome book of 64 pages, suitable for 
children from three to eight years old. 

Contains the letters of the alphabet in 
large red letters. 

Gives a short rhyme about a Bible char- 
acter in connection with each letter. 

Relates twenty-six Bible stories in sim- 
ple language that will interest every child. 

An appropriate gift book. Price, 35 cents, 
postpaid. 

Address: Gospel Trumpet Company, An- 
derson, Ind. 



EXPULSION AND EMBATTLED 
"FRATS." 

The Chicago Record-Herald of Sep- 
tember 27th, has some very sensible edi- 
torial remarks upon the "Frat" question : 

"From a moral or educational point of 
view the fraternity question in the 
schools requires no further discussion. 
The case against the organizations that 
bring caste, division, bitterness and 
malice into public institutions maintained 
in the interest of good citizenship and 
democratic ideals is really complete. 

"The right of school authorities to dis- 
cipline recalcitrant pupils, to deny them 
representations and honors in school 
contests, functions, and ceremonies is 
also undeniable. 

"But what of the legal right of such 
authorities to exclude zealous and en- 
thusiastic frat heroes from school for 
persisting in insubordination? In some 
instances the drastic and extreme meas- 
ure has had to be taken by school boards, 
and the fond but foolish parents of frat 
leaders have rushed into court with the 
argument that the constitutional right 
to education cannot be denied under 
such circumstances. 

"Within a week two decisions have 
been rendered on this point. A Denver 
court has held that even expulsion is le- 
gally permissible and that the right of 
the pupil to attend school 'is not in- 
volved' where the exclusion is an act of 
discipline. A Michigan court has taken 
the opposite view — that pupils cannot be 
expelled from school for membership in 
'frats' or refusals to sign anti-frat 
pledges. 

"Where courts disagree it would be 
rash for a layman to venture a 'legal' 
opinion. The question will reach the 
highest courts and be isettled by them. 
But whatever the outcome may be, the 
war on the undemocratic, demoralising 
and disintegrating frats must be c<trried 
on to the limit of the law. Even consti- 
tutions are amendable. The right to free 
schooling should not" involve the right to 
bring vicious and dangerous practices, 
and notions into public schools." 



Don't bother to forgive your supposed 
enemies — just forget them. 



December, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



227 



€0tttnbutt0tt0* 



A SUPPOSED CASE. 

BY N. B. TAILLEFER. 

The moral question involved in a case 
about which there is apparent difference 
of opinion has interested us a long time. 
To state the issue, we will call in those 
never-failing helpers, John Doe and Rich- 
ard Roe, asking leave, for convenience, 
to use their given names. 

'Meeting one day on the street they 
worked out our case, setting forth in vis- 
ible form the terms of our question. 
Richard said to John : 

"A man of whom I have lately heard, 
but whom I have never seen, is related 
in a business way to some close friends 
of mine. He is a man of uncertain char- 
acter, about some of whose ideas and 
practices I have rather indefinite misgiv- 
ings, though my friends give me strong 
assurances about him. These friends of 
mine know of you through me and are 
anxious to have you join me in guarding 
the interests of their associate. I have 
promised to pass no judgment of my own 
on anything I learn about him ; or, at 
least, if he tells me anything of his own 
accord I am pledged to keep it secret. 
Now, all we wish is to have you join in 
the promise we have made together." 

"What !" exclaimed John, ''promise 

to keep any secret whatever? Not I." 

"Why not ? I have promised," replied 
Richard ; "so have all the rest — and some 
fine men are among them." 

"Well! But you say yourself, Rich- 
ard, you cannot vouch for this man, and 
you do not even know him ; yet you will 
protect any secret purpose or deed if it 
happens to be his ! Preposterous !" 

"John Doe, wouldn't it be a noble thing 
to protect a man in trouble? Wouldn't 
you defend me, even though you often 
take the opposite side, as I am sorry to 
find you disposed to do now?" 

"You may be sure 1 would as far as 



I could; but if I promised to act in vio- 
lent opposition to right judgment, you 
would not even trust a promise rooted in 
so little character. But that is another 
thing; I am perfectly willing to promise 
to act the part of a friend to you and to 
him. What I will not do is to promise 
to let an unknown man play the tyrant to 
an unreasoning slave, who has needlessly 
given away his own conscience. That I 
won't do." 

"I don't see why you feel so, John; 
you are not likely to be asked to do any- 
thing you would not have done volun- 
tarily on your own good judgment." 

"Then why not let me use my own 
judgment, instead of promising not to?" 

"But he wants your assurance." 

"Very well ; I authorize you to assure 
him that I will use the kindest judgment 
possible, and be as trusty a confidant as I 
can." 

"That will not satisfy any of us. We 
want a more complete pledge in more ex- 
act terms. Of course, you do not have 
to favor us if you are unwilling. I did, 
without a moment's thought, what I 
asked you to do ; it seemed a very little 
thing for you to do ; since you make so 
much of it, however, I am sorry I asked 
you." 

"I admit that dropping judgment and 
conscience, with freedom and independ- 
ence, out of my character, is not in my 
view a little thing. You ask a lifelong 
pledge covering all possible ground. 
There seems to be no limit." 

"O, yes, there is a limit, I assure you. 
Your difficulty is provided for; we ex- 
pressly except murder and treason." 

"How do you class murder and trea- 
son?" 

"With crimes." 

"How many more things would you 
include in the class of crimes ?" 

"I don't know ; a good many." 

"Any serious ones?" 

"Certainly. But we are wandering 
from the subject, John. If you are satis- 
fied with my explanation, won't you 
promise now ?" 

"I am not satisfied, Richard; you re- 
fuse to explain fully." 

"I do not refuse." 

''Very well ; then I will ask whether 



228 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1909. 



((' 



you will agree that there are at least five 
crimes, including murder and treason, 
which a man might commit?" 

'Of course, and a good many more." 
Those two, by name, the pledge 
would exclude ?" 

''We would not have taken it if it had 
not." 

"The pledge being universal save for 
the exception, two crimes having been 
excluded, all the rest of them remain in- 
cluded?" 

"No, they don't; they are not men- 
tioned." 

"Is anything not criminal mentioned by 
name ?" 

"Well, no, I suppose not." 

"Is anything whatever included?" 

"Of course; everything." 

"Everything except two crimes. Every- 
thing else, including all other crimes, re- 
mains in the pledge of secrecy which you 
have taken. Inasmuch as exception 
proves the rule, emphasis is put upon the 
class headed crime. Two crimes are ex- 
cepted from the crimes that must be hid- 
den by the innocent for the criminal. You 
must be accessory after the fact." 

"I don't see it as you do, John; but I 
see it is of no use to try to persuade 
you." 

"No, Richard, it is of no use. I will 
not be the kind of man who invites crim- 
inals to make him their confidant, and 
you do not know that this man does not 
seek this blind promise for the reason 
that he is intending to do something he 
wishes hidden, even if known to a few. 
I do not put a light value on my con- 
science, and my freedom of responsible 
judgment and action. I have no mind to 
range myself among 'partakers of other 
men's sins,' or to go even so far as si- 
lence toward meriting the reproof, 'When 
thou sawest a thief thou consentedst with 
him.' " 

Richard left John standing in the street 
musing, and wondering what had so 
twisted his old acquaintance's moral 
ideas. He knew that all sane and decent 
men accounted silence shielding crime, 
itself a flagrant crime, and wondered if 
Richard Roe was going insane. Then he 
reflected that others were in the same 
conspiracy into which he had been invit- 



ed. It might grow, make huge mouth- 
fuls of pretensions in the course of time, 
and at length borrow some honorable 
word to cover its shame withal — some 
word, possibly, like Fraternal. Thus he 
mused, unaware that already Freemasons 
cherished this immoral baseness under 
the title, "Third Point of Fellowship." 



A PROTEST AGAINST SECRECY. 

BY REV. C. G. STERLING. 

Do we not make a mistake when we 
lay too great emphasis on the differences 
between the major and the minor secret 
orders ? 

It is true, indeed, that the Masons and 
the Odd Fellows have much to answer 
for which cannot be charged against 
some of the other secret orders, e. g., 
their ofiicial rejection of our Lord; yet I 
believe we need to be clear and outspoken 
in our testimony in reference to the evil 
per se of any and every organization 
pledged to secrecy. 

We may not rightly limit our criticism 
to oath-bound orders ; for, while the 
special sin of profanity is, as we believe, 
chargeable in these cases, yet the funda- 
mental evil of engaging to keep secret 
matters not yet known, is always a sur- 
render of one's God-given independence, 
and is necessarily fraught with danger to 
one's fellowmen. Even labor unions, if 
essentially secret, are a menace to the 
community. Pledged secrecy on the part 
of any organization exposes the public 
to danger and exposes the organization to 
suspicion. Witness the general suspicion 
of labor unions in connection with recent 
dynamiting crimes in Chicago and In- 
dianapolis ! 

If an individual lodge, representing 
any craft, feels compelled at any given 
time, in defense of the rights of its mem- 
bers, to adopt measures which, for their 
successful accomplishment, must needs 
be kept secret, it might not be wrong for 
the members, knowing the particular 
measure resolved upon, to agree to se- 
crecy in regard to it,, though such occa- 
sions, I believe, are rare ; ordinarily, a 
frank, open policy will be found more 
effectual; the light is congenial to right 
and truth. Employers will be less suspi- 
cious and the public more intelligently 



December, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



229 



sympathetic. But to give a solemn 
pledge on initiation into any or- 
der or lodge to keep secret what- 
ever shall take place in its meetings may 
be binding oneself beforehand to partici- 
pation (by silence) in criminality or 
moral wrong, which one would himself 
abhor, yet which he might at any given 
time be entirely unable to successfully 
oppose. In these cases one may become 
aware of procedure and plans which he 
is bound by inviolable obligations to hu- 
manity to expose ; yet his hands have 
been tied beforehand by himself ; his 
mouth is forever stopped — unless he de- 
termines to repudiate his pledge. 

Even if the applicant for membership 
is assured that his pledge will not bind 
him (or her) to any wrong, yet if the 
lodge is to be the judge for him of what 
is right or wrong, he surrenders his con- 
science to others ; and if the form of 
pledge in any case should allow the mem- 
ber to be his own judge, even then there 
is great danger that individual judgment 
would be very much embarrassed and 
conscience somewhat perverted through 
the inevitable desire — not to say compul- 
sion — to favor those to whom one has 
bound himself by a general, inclusive 
pledge. 

The temptation to omit testimony 
against such orders as the G. A. R. or se- 
cret temperance societies, because patri- 
O'tism, morality, and other virtues have 
been tied to them, has weakened the 
cause against organized secrecy. We be- 
lieve in patriotism and we believe in 
morality, but we disbelieve in organized 
secrecy. 

''Neither do men light a candle and put 
it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; 
and it giveth light unto all." 

If our friends in the secret orders have 
a good thing hidden there, they should 
take the bushel basket off. ''Let your 
light so shine before men !" 



Many a man mistakes a stock of pious 
quotations for riches of a religious charac- 
ter. — Fraternal Record. 



Often the fear of not accomplishing 
what is before us is the only thing in our 
way. 



CHRIST REJECTED. 

RY REV. WILLIAM DILLON, D. D. 

In the Supreme Council for the South- 
ern jurisdiction of Scottish Rite Masons, 
in session in Washington, D. C, October 
22, 1909, the following declaration was 
made, as to religion : 

"The supreme council recognized by 
the supreme council for the southern 
jurisdiction of the United States by its 
recognition to-day, has re-affirmed the 
Masonic doctrine that Masonry does not 
in any of its degrees interfere with the 
religious or political convictions of any 
man.'^ 

This end might be secured in either 
of two ways : 

1. By tolerating every man's religious 
views in the lodge ; or 

2. By excluding all religious senti- 
ments, in which all do not agree. 

That the latter is the meaning to be 
taken, Mackey clearly determines under 
the article "Religion," in his Lexicon of 
Masonry : "Freemasonry does not pro- 
fess to interfere with the religious opin- 
ions of its members. It asks only for 
a declaration of that simple and univer- 
sal faith, in which men of all nations 
and all sects agree, the belief in a God, 
and in His suj^erintending providence. 
Beyond this it does not venture, but 
leaves the minds of its disciples, on oth- 
er and sectarian points, perfectly un- 
trammeled. This is the only reHgious 
qualification required of a candidate, but 
this is most strictly demanded. The re- 
ligion then of Masonry is a pure theism, 
on which its different members engraft 
their own peculiar opinions, but they are 
not permitted to introduce them into the 
lodge, or to connect their truth or false- 
hood with the truth of Masonry." 

So then the Jew does not believe in 
Jesus, and under ^Masonic law Christ 
must be left out of the lodge. Can a 
man confess Jesus in the church, and 
deny Him in his lodge, and be a Chris- 
tian? 

It is true also that Freemasonry does 
not uniformly recognize the true God. 
One of their emblems has three Hebrew 
names of their deity — Jehovah, Yah, 
Baal; so that Baal is as truly the Ma- 
sonic deity as Jehovah. 






230 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1909. 



Since the Scriptures determine that 
'*he that hath not the Son, hath not the 
Father," God is excluded. 

About two years ago I met C. H. 
Lyman, of Columbus, Ohio, the Grand 
Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Odd- 
fellows for Ohio. I asked him the ques- 
tion, "If an appeal should come up from 
a subordinate lodge, to your Grand 
Lodge, to determine whether it is con- 
sistent with the rules and laws of Odd- 
fellowship to offer prayer in a lodge in 
Christ's name, how would you decide 
it?" 

He answered with some hesitation, 
'We would rule Christ out, you know 
the Jews." 

There can be no worship of the true 
God only in the name of Jesus, ''No man 
Cometh to the Father but by Me." In 
I Cor. 10:20, Paul shows that the wor- 
ship of the Gentiles was not rendered to 
God, but was the worship of devils, on 
the theory that all that is not the true 
worship of God is devil worship. True 
worship must be in Christ's name. Lodge 
worship is not in Christ's name, and 
hence is devil worship. 



A man should keep out of his life all 
that insults and hurts his soul, and he 
should hold the interests of others as 
dear as he holds his own. — -Benson. 



If you are good natured there is noth- 
ing you cannot say ; if you are not good 
natured you cannot say anything. — ^Hen- 
ry Ward Beecher. 



"If a person don't get a good hold on 
his life while he has it here on the earth, 
what under the sun is he going to hang 
onto when he gits flung out into space?" 



Soberly and with clear eyes believe in 
your own time and place. There is not 
and there never has been a better time 
or a better place to live in. — Phillips 
Brooks. 



Some sorrows are but footprints in the 
snow, which the genial sun effaces, or, if 
it does not wholly efface, changes into 
dimples. — ^Longfellow. 



COURTS, COLLEGES, AND UNIONS. 

BY PRESIDENT CHARLES A. BLANCHARD. 

Fathers and Brethren: 

The great work in which we are en- 
gaged is always identical in principle, but 
forms change from hour to hour. No 
man who has ever studied the obliga- 
tions of a secret society can have any 
doubt as to the conflict of such obliga- 
tions with personal rights and civil duty. 
Yet the evidences of this antagonism are 
continually supplied in the life of men 
just as they are evident from the phras- 
ing of the oaths. 

There is now in prison in Chicago, un- 
dergoing trial for murder, a physician 
who is said to have made this remark to 
a reporter. The doctor said, "Are you 
a Mason?" The reporter replied, "No, 
I am sorry to say, I am not." The doc- 
tor then continued, 'Tf you were a Ma- 
son, I could confide in you ; but as it is, 
I had better not say anything more." I 
am quoting from memory, and the words 
may not be accurate, but the thought is 
correctly reported. 

Now, this doctor may not have been 
guilty of murder. All the circumstances 
in the case seem to indicate that he was. 
He was alone in the house with her when 
she died. He has told a number of dif- 
ferent stories as to the way in which 
she died. Each time that he brings in 
a new story, he says that the former 
story was not true. He is known to 
have been paying attentions to young 
ladies which honorable men, who are 
married, do not offer. The relatives of 
his wife all testify that she was a good 
woman, that she was perfectly well the 
day before she was killed, and that there 
is no reason for believing that she took 
her own life. They also say that the 
only trouble she had was the fact that 
her husband did not seem to care for 
her. Give this doctor the benefit of the 
doubt. Hope, as well as you can, that 
he has not actually taken human fife; 
nevertheless, what a painful exhibit you 
have. Now, this doictor aflirms his inno- 
cence ; he said that burglars killed his 
wife, that possibly she killed herself ; that 
he did not cause her death. He says 
that he is a Free Mason; that if a re- 
porter were a Free Mason he could talk 



December, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



231 



to him freely. But what would he say? 
Would he confess the crime of murder 
or would he stick to his story ; so far as 
one can judge, he must be thinking of 
confession. There would be no reason 
for secrecy if he meant still to affirm his 
innocence. All this goes to show that 
while honest men do not need secret so- 
cieties, such organizations might be very 
helpful to murderers. 

A Secret Society Sign in Court. 

In this connection there is an interest- 
ing little story going through the public 
press which many of you have probably 
read. A man on trial in a court was ob- 
served to be making a certain sign re- 
peatedly, in the presence of the jury. 
This continued so long that the judge 
called him to the bar and said to him, 
''What was that sign you were making 
to the jury?" The man replied, 'Tt was 
the sign of an Odd Fellow." The judge 
said, "What were you making it to that 
juryman for?" "Well," he replied, 'T 
knew there was at least one Odd Fellow 
on the jury and I wanted to have him 
know that I was a brother." The judge 
was greatly indignant ; he punished the 
man for contempt of court. And the 
matter was reported by the Associated 
Press throughout the country. Now, if 
Odd Fellowship is a legitimate organiza- 
tion, if its signs and tokens may prop- 
erly be taught and used, why should not 
that man have done exactly what he 
did? What is the use of belonging to a 
lodge, paying its dues and performing 
duties required, if one is to get no use 
of it? And if Odd Fellowship does not 
teach and practice interference with the 
law, what harm would it do for this Odd 
Fellow prisoner to make himself known 
as an Odd Fellow to his brothers on the 
jury? The simple fact is, that every in- 
telligent man admits, that such a state 
of fact as is recorded above would al- 
most certainly lead to corruption in the 
courts. Nobody supposes that the Odd 
Fellow juryman would not have favored 
his brother Odd Fellow prisoner. Of 
course he would do so ; that is what the 
thing was for, and, while there may be 
men who would not recognize such an 
obligation, under such circumstances, 
there are plenty of others who will, and 
do. 



But again, suppose that the judge had 
not observed the sign, what then? It 
seems that the man who gave it was a 
bit stupid. In place of giving it once or 
twice, and stopping, he continued it un- 
til it secured the attention of the court. 
Then, when he was questioned, instead 
of lying, he told the truth. He told what 
he was doing, and why he was doing it. 
Thus he got himself into trouble, and 
thus he brought the order into the Asso- 
ciated Press. How many cases have 
there probably been in the last twelve 
months where secret associations have 
done this same sort of work, but have 
done it more secretly and effectively? 
Nobody but God can tell. But any 
thoughtful man can see, and has a right 
to say, that with thousands of secret so- 
ciety men in courts all the time, it is ab- 
solutely certain that these signs must be 
continually given and that in a large ma- 
jority of instances no one knows any- 
thing about it except persons who are 
sworn not to tell the truth. Such facts 
as these bring to mind the saying of 
Daniel Webster and Wendell Phillips, 
that secret societies ought to be forbidden 
by law. 

College Fraternities Again. 

The world moves and moves very rap- 
idly, but to a careless man it does not 
seem to move at all. From month to 
month I have called your attention to 
the discussions in boards of education, 
civil courts and state legislatures respect- 
ing school fraternities. Last month I re- 
minded you that the college men who 
have been either ignorant, negligent or 
cowardly, concerning the interests of 
those entrusted to them, were beginning 
to arouse themselves. Of course, most 
of the faculties which have tolerated 
these cancers of our educational system 
have neither repented nor reformed. The 
fact that they have not done so is respon- 
sible for such an item as I find in this 
morning's Times. In a certain college 
near New York, the fraternities were 
supposed to be running the athletics. A 
student corresponding with a paper men- 
tioned the fact ; his action becoming 
known, a crowd of two hundred athletes 
and fraternity men took him out of his 
room and held him under a pump, pump- 
ing ice cold water over him until he was 






fi 



232 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1909. 



half dead from the fright and exposure. 

There is no intimation in the article 
that what the young man said was un- 
true. The substantial accuracy of his 
article seems to be practically admitted, 
but the fraternity men were angry that 
their secret manipulation of affairs should 
be brought to light. They were willing 
to do the work and to make their boast 
of the number of athletes who were con- 
nected with their fraternity, but they did 
not wish the public to know why these 
fraternity athletes were selected. Then 
like the miserable cowards they were, in 
place of sending one man to wreak their 
vengeance on this student, who told the 
truth, they go, just as such men generally 
do, in a great crowd, and perilled the life 
of their mate who had committed the of- 
fense of telling in public what they were 
doing in the dark. 

We have the same thing repeated again 
and again in the history of labor unions. 
It is never man for man, but always a 
crowd of men, three, five, or more, 
against one, and they come behind in the 
dark and do their nefarious deeds. Then 
they put on a sanctimonious air and tell 
what splendid men belong to their lodges 
and how prominent they are in the soci- 
ety where they move. Shall we never 
get done with such lying hypocrites and 
cowards ? 

War Against a Woman. 

Some time since, when I was deliver- 
ing a series of Bible studies in Indiana, I 
was reported very accurately and intelli- 
gently by a young lady whom I did not 
at the time meet. Some weeks ago this 
young lady wrote me from Spokane, 
Washington, saying that she had a fa- 
vorable opportunity to go to work as a 
proof-reader, but that she would not be 
permitted to accept and hold the position 
unless she would unite with some 'anion. 
Her question was, whether I thought that 
as a Christian she had a right to unite 
with this secret society for the purpose 
of securing this position. I replied that 
I had great sympathy with her and all 
other workers who were compelled to 
choose between fidelity to God and an 
opportunity to earn honest bread, but 
that in my judgment she would probably 
be better off and certainly happier if she 



should follow her conscience, even at the 
sacrifice of her personal interests. I said 
to her, further, that if she could secure 
and forward to me the obligation which 
she would be required to take, I might 
form a more definite opinion on the sub- 
ject. She shortly thereafter sent to me 
a page containing this obligation. It was 
an oath for a slave, not for a free wom- 
an. It bound the one who took it to 
obey the rules and regulations of that j 
order at all costs, irrespective of obliga- * 
tions arising from the Divine institutions 
of human society. I am glad to say that 
this young woman, fifteen hundred or 
two thousand miles away from home, had 
the courage and conscience to decline to 
take upon her soul such a slave's oath. 
She said in her letter that God had 
opened the way to other employment and 
that as soon as possible she intended to 
return to a country where people were 
allowed to labor without subjecting them- 
selves to such secret and inhuman des- 
potisms. 

This is well ; but where there is one 
who has sufficient strength of character 
to take this position^ and who knows 
God well enough to do it, at whatever 
cost, there are thousands and tens of 
thousands who are actually driven into 
these organizations. They are hunted as 
men hunt wolves, until they abandon the 
professions and trades in which they are 
skilled, or submit. In my own town, a 
gentleman, by trade a carpenter, when 
working on his own house was told by a 
walking delegate that he would not be 
permitted to do so. He replied in sub- 
stance, 'T have an excellent shotgun, and 
if any man undertakes to meddle with 
me he will be sorry for it, in my opin- 
ion.'' Well and good. But why should 
a man in a civilized country be compelled 
to defend his right to drive nails into a 
board on his own property? For what 
do we pay taxes and elect and install of- 
ficers ? The fact is, that a secret society 
is a government within a government. It 
is essential, incipient treason, and no 
man who wishes to be considered a good 
citizen should for an hour retain connec- 
tion with such an organization. 

I do not know whether we shall see 
the end of lodges before our Lord comes 



December, 1909. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Dv not; certainly we shall see the end 
then. The progress of the race in cer- 
tain directions has been so marked and so 
Deneficent that we may hope for large 
:hings yet. But no matter when truth is 
to triumph. Our duty is equally clear, 
ivhatever the case may be. The life of 
fesus Christ did not seem to be success- 
ful. He died on the cross and was bur- 
ied in a borrowed grave, yet after nine- 
;een hundred years the words which He 
spake and the deeds'* which He did are 
reverently studied by hundreds of mil- 
ions of people. Workers die, but the 
truth marches on and in the end every 
Dne who has united himself to it will 
share in the complete and final victory 
ivhich it will gain. 
Wheaton College. 



HOW TO OVERCOME THE BAAL OF 
SECRECY. 

BY REV. J. M. FOSTER. 

Elijah wages war against Baalism in 
Israel. On Mount Carmel he convinced 
the people that the Lord was the true 
God, when fire came down from heaven 
and consumed his sacrifice, and they sus- 
tained him in taking the 450 priests of 
Baal and slaying them. Then came the 
wrestling with God in prayer for rain. 
After prevailing in his intercessions, he 
ran before Ahab's chariot to the gate of 
Jezreel. 

It was only natural that reaction should 
come. And when he saw how defiant 
Jezebel was and heard her threatening 
message and beheld how the people 
cringed before her wrath and forsook 
him, he fled for his life. He did not 
value his life, only so far as it would be 
used for God's kingdom. But he was de- 
feated. His expectations were blasted. 
He thought God was against him, and he 
wished to die and get away from the 
wreck. He who had announced so often, 
"The God of Israel, before whom he 
stood," now lost sight of His divine pres- 
ence. 

But God's way of dealing with His 
desponding servant is wonderful. He 
leads him to the Juniper tree to sleep. 
He sends an angel with food and drink. 
He gives His beloved more sleep. Then 
He provides a second meal. And then 



He leads him forty days and nights over 
the desert to Horeb. Here he was at 
home in the Mount of God where the 
law had been proclaimed amid the fire 
and the tempest and earthquake. Elijah 
knew of this. He also knew that God 
caused His goodness to pass before 
Moses, and he heard the proclamation, 
*'The Lord, the Lord God, merciful and 
gracious, long-sufi:*ering, abundant in 
goodness and truth, forgiving iniquity, 
transgression and sin, keeping covenant 
and mercy with them that fear Him to a 
thousand generations." He is therefore 
prepared to witness ''the great and strong 
wind that rent the mountain." But God 
was not in the wind. Then he wit- 
nessed ''the earthquake." But God was 
not in the earthquake. Then he saw 
"the fire." But God was not in the fire. 
Then he "heard a still, small voice." 

This penetrated the Prophet. It is the 
voice of Jesus, "who does not strive nor 
cry, nor Hft up nor cause His voice to 
be heard in the street." "The bruised 
reed He will not break, the smoking flax 
He will not quench." Here is the king- 
dom that Cometh not with observation. 
Here is the biding of God's power. 

The prophet is assured that he is not 
alone. God has reserved 7,(X)o men in 
Israel who have not bowed the knee to 
Baal and whose lips have not kissed his 
image. Elijah is sent back to work with 
them, to organize the forces of righteous- 
ness and God will give the victory over 
Baal. 

Now the anti-secret forces in this land 
have been in the field for forty years. 
They have had their Mount Carmel vic- 
tory in exasperating the lodge members 
by publicly exposing their diabolical 
work. But the reaction came. A wilder- 
ness experience came. But God led His 
servants to Horeb and taught them Eli- 
jah's lesson : "It is not by might, nor by 
power, but by my Spirit, saith the Lord." 
The weapons of our warfare are not car- 
nal, but mighty through God to the pull- 
ing down of the strongholds." The quiet 
mobilizing of Christ's friends, separated 
from lodge fellowship in church and in 
state, is the duty of the hour. That is 
the still, small voice. 

I. TJie quietest forces are often the 



234 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1909. 



most effective. The' force of electricity 
sends messages across continents and un- 
der the ocean, moves cars through our 
cities, illumin/ates and heats our houses, 
and electrocutes any one touching the 
''live wire." It is silent. The force of 
gravitation holds the planets in their or- 
bits about the sun, and all the worlds of 
space are kept in places by it. There is 
no speech nor language; its voice is not 
heard. The sun rises and the stars put 
out their light. But the light and heat of 
the sun come so quietly that the sleeper 
is not awakened by them. 

So God's greatest work in His king- 
dom of grace is by silent forces. We live 
in an age of rush and bustle and blowing 
of whistles and blasts of trumpets and 
loud advertising. Attention is attracted 
by dress and head gear. The press teems 
with heated romance. Napoleons in 
finance corral the business of a continent 
or the world in a colossal syndicate to en- 
rich a few at the expense of the many. 
The political parties in convention and 
during the campaign use every device — 
good and bad — to attract a major follow- 
ing. The reformed churches follow 
Rome — the mother of harlots — at break- 
neck speed in introducing ritual services 
to attract the world. The ministry adopt 
sensational methods to secure an audi- 
ence, forgetting that people go to God's 
house to worship God, not to be enter- 
tained. All this the secret lodge system 
promotes. 

Now the National Christian: Associa- 
tion lifts up its protest against all this. 
It recognizes that the kingdom of God 
cometh not with observation. Life is 
more than noise ; character is more than 
uniform and brass buttons and feathered 
caps, and pewter swords, and epaulets, 
and yellow stripes, and brass bands. The 
hidden man of the heart — the new crea- 
ture in Christ Jesus — is the essential. 
"Marvel not that I said unto you, ye 
must be born again." 

11. The force of love is superior to the 
force of severity. Elijah knew how to 
voice the severity of God in proclaiming 
His judgments upon an impenitent na- 
tion. But at Horeb God taught him to 
voice the loving kindness of God in con- 
junction with His flaming justice. "Be- 



hold, therefore, the goodness and the 
severity of God." "I mercy will and 
judgment sing." The tender mercy of t